Christchurch East

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Christchurch East electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election Christchurch East electorate, 2014.svg
Christchurch East electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Christchurch East, originally called Christchurch City East, is a current New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It was first created for the 1871 election and was abolished for two period, from 1875–1905 and again from 1946–1996. It was last created for the introduction of the MMP voting system for the 1996 election. The current MP is Poto Williams, a member of the New Zealand Labour Party who was first elected in the 2013 Christchurch East by-election.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

1871 New Zealand general election New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1871 was held between 14 January and 23 February to elect 78 MPs across 72 electorates to the fifth session of the New Zealand Parliament. 41,527 electors were registered.

1996 New Zealand general election

The 1996 New Zealand general election was held on 12 October 1996 to determine the composition of the 45th New Zealand Parliament. It was notable for being the first election to be held under the new mixed-member proportional (MMP) electoral system, and produced a parliament considerably more diverse than previous elections. It saw the National Party, led by Jim Bolger, retain its position in government, but only after protracted negotiations with the smaller New Zealand First party to form a coalition. New Zealand First's position as "kingmaker", able to place either of the two major parties into government, was a significant election outcome.

Contents

Population centres

Christchurch East electorate boundaries for the 2008 and 2011 elections Christchurch east electorate 2008.png
Christchurch East electorate boundaries for the 2008 and 2011 elections

The electorate is based on the eastern part of the City of Christchurch. When the electorate was first formed through the Representation Act 1870, the western boundary of the electorate was Colombo Street. Unlike today, the eastern boundary was away from the coast; rather, the Avon electorate covered the coastal regions. [1]

Christchurch City in South Island, New Zealand

Christchurch is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand and the seat of the Canterbury Region. The Christchurch urban area lies on the South Island's east coast, just north of Banks Peninsula. It is home to 404,500 residents, making it New Zealand's third-most populous city behind Auckland and Wellington. The Avon River flows through the centre of the city, with an urban park located along its banks.

Colombo Street main road in Christchurch, New Zealand

Colombo Street is a main road of the city of Christchurch, New Zealand. It runs south-north through the centre of Christchurch with a break at Cathedral Square. As with many other central Christchurch streets, it is named for a colonial Anglican bishopric, Colombo, Sri Lanka in what at the time was known as Ceylon. Parts of the street which run through Sydenham were known as Addison Street during the 1880s, and some parts were known as Colombo Road.

Avon is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It was created for the 1861 general election and existed until 1996. It was represented by 13 Members of Parliament and was held by Independents, Liberal Party or Labour Party representatives.

The electorate is bounded in the east by the Pacific Ocean and in the north by the Waimakariri River. Since the 2008 election, the western and southern boundary followed Main North Road, Marshland Road, North Parade, Dudley Creek, the Avon River, Keyes Road and Pages Road, before cutting though the Bromley wastewater treatment plant to Cuthberts Road. The boundary then followed Cuthberts Road, Breezes Road and Bridge Street to the Avon River, before following the Avon through the Avon Heathcote Estuary and out to the Pacific Ocean. [2]

Waimakariri River river in New Zealand

The Waimakariri River, formerly briefly known as the Courtenay River, is one of the largest of the North Canterbury rivers, in the South Island of New Zealand. It flows for 151 kilometres (94 mi) in a generally southeastward direction from the Southern Alps across the Canterbury Plains to the Pacific Ocean. In Māori, Waimakariri has several meanings, one of which is "river of cold rushing water". The river is known colloquially in Canterbury as "The Waimak".

2008 New Zealand general election election

The 2008 New Zealand general election was held on 8 November 2008 to determine the composition of the 49th New Zealand parliament. The conservative National Party, headed by its parliamentary leader John Key, won the largest share of votes and seats, ending nine years of government by the social-democratic Labour Party, led by Helen Clark. Key announced a week later that he would lead a National minority government with confidence-and-supply support from the ACT, United Future and Māori parties. The Governor-General swore Key in as New Zealand's 38th Prime Minister on 19 November 2008. This marked an end to nine years of Labour Party government, and the beginning of the Fifth National Government of New Zealand which would govern for 9 years, until its loss to the Labour Party in the 2017 general election.

Avon River (Canterbury) river in Canterbury Region, New Zealand

The Avon River / Ōtākaro flows through the centre of the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, and out to an estuary, which it shares with the Heathcote River, the Avon Heathcote Estuary.

The following suburbs, in alphabetical order, are at least partially located in the electorate: Aranui, Avondale, Bexley, Bottle Lake, Bridgend, Brooklands, Burwood, Chaneys, Dallington, Kainga, Marshland, New Brighton, North New Brighton, Ouruhia, Parklands, Queenspark, Shirley, South New Brighton, Southshore, Spencerville, Stewarts Gully, Styx, Waimairi Beach, and Wainoni. [2]

Aranui Place in Canterbury, New Zealand

Aranui is one of the eastern suburbs of Christchurch. It is a lower socio-economic area. The area is predominantly residential with pockets of light industry. There is a cluster of shops and service facilities at the intersection of Breezes Road and Pages Road.

Bexley, New Zealand Place in Canterbury, New Zealand

The suburb of Bexley is situated in East Christchurch on the west bank of the Avon River approximately one kilometre from the Avon Heathcote Estuary. It is enclosed within a bend in the Avon River and borders the suburb of Aranui.

Bottle Lake, New Zealand suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand

Bottle Lake is a suburb in the north-east of Christchurch with a low number of residents. Most of the suburb is covered by Bottle Lake Forest, which has since the mid-1970s become a popular recreation area.

Population loss after the quakes necessitated expansion of the electorate in the 2013/14 redistribution, with the electorate gaining Mairehau and Shirley from Christchurch Central, Bromley from Port Hills and the remainder of Marshland from Waimakariri. [3]

Mairehau Place

Mairehau is a suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand. It is located four kilometres north of the city centre, close to the edge of the urbanised central city area. It is home to a secondary school, Mairehau High School. Much new development is being carried out on the northern edge of Mairehau.

Shirley, New Zealand Place

Shirley, sometimes referred to as Windsor, is a suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand, about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north-east of the city centre. The area was used for farming from the 1850s, and subdivision started in the early 20th century, with most of the houses being built between 1950 and 1980.

Christchurch Central Current New Zealand electorate

Christchurch Central is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate in the South Island city of Christchurch. The electorate was established for the 1946 election and, until 2011 had always been won by the Labour Party. Since 2008, the incumbent was Brendon Burns but the election night results for the 2011 election resulted in a tie; the special vote results combined with a judicial recount revealed a 47-vote majority for Nicky Wagner, the National list MP based in the electorate. Wagner significantly increased her winning margin in the 2014 election after having declared the electorate "unwinnable" for National earlier in the year following a boundary review.

History

Christchurch City East was first created for the 1871 election [4] by the Representation Act 1870, which was passed to increase the number of general electorates to 74 from the 61 that were used at the 1866 election. The Representation Act 1870 also disestablished some multi-member electorates, and the three-member City of Christchurch electorate was split up, with one part of it forming the new Christchurch City East electorate. [1]

1866 New Zealand general election New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1866 was held between 12 February and 6 April to elect 70 MPs to the fourth term of the New Zealand Parliament.

Christchurch was a parliamentary electorate in Christchurch, New Zealand. It existed three times. Originally it was the Town of Christchurch from 1853 to 1860. From the 1860–61 election to the 1871 election, it existed as City of Christchurch. It then existed from the 1875–76 election until the 1881 election. The last period was from the 1890 election to the 1905 election. Since the 1946 election, a similarly named electorate called Christchurch Central has been in existence.

The first election was contested by Jerningham Wakefield, who had previously represented Christchurch Country in the 1st Parliament (1853–1855), and Andrew Duncan, who was Mayor of Christchurch in 1870. Wakefield won the election and represented the electorate until the end of the electoral term in 1875, [5] [6] when Christchurch City East was abolished, replaced by the three-member electorate City of Christchurch. [4]

Christchurch East was re-created for the 1905 election. [4] The election was contested by Thomas Davey (who had been a representative of the City of Christchurch electorate for the Liberal Party since 1902), William Whitehouse Collins (who had previously been in Parliament for the Liberal Party), Henry Toogood [7] (a young engineer who only recently left Canterbury College and who would become one of the founding members of the Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand), and Frederick Cooke [8] (a prominent member of the Socialist Party). Davey was successful. [9]

The 1908 election was contested by Davey (the incumbent), Charles Boxshall (who represented the opposition, which at that point had not formed into a political party), James McCombs (who was an Independent Liberal, i.e. he was not part of a formal party), and Frederick Cooke (who had also contested the previous election standing for the Socialist Party). Davey was re-elected, with McCombs coming second. [10] [11] The Second Ballot Act 1908 provided for second or runoff ballots between the top two candidates where the top candidate did not get an absolute majority. [12] As Davey had obtained 55.56% of the votes, a second ballot was not required in Christchurch East. [10]

The 1911 election was contested by Davey (the incumbent), Henry Thacker (a prominent medical doctor standing as an Independent Liberal), Hiram Hunter (who stood for the original Labour Party), and Frederick Cooke (who had also contested the two previous election standing for the Socialist Party). The first ballot was won by Thacker, with Davey beating Hunter by only four votes for second place. A second ballot was required, as Thacker had achieved 32.68% of the votes in the first ballot, far short of an absolute majority. The second ballot was won by Davey with a majority of over 17% of the votes. [13]

Davey planned to contest the 1914 election. The Liberal Government had by now been replaced by the Reform Government. At the opening meeting of his campaign, Davey refused to commit himself to a motion of no confidence against the government, which in turn resulted in the meeting refusing to give him a vote of confidence. A week later, he withdrew his nomination. [14] [15] [16] This left three other candidates in the election: Henry Thacker (who had contested the previous election as an Independent Liberal, but with Davey's withdrawal contested as behalf of the Liberal Party), George Duncan Macfarlane (an auctioneer with no prior political experience who stood for the Reform Party), and Hiram Hunter (who this time contested for the Social Democratic Party, which was the successor to the original Labour Party). [17] [18] Thacker was successful and succeeded Davey. [19]

The 1919 election was contested by Thacker (the incumbent, and since May of that year Mayor of Christchurch [20] ) and Hiram Hunter (who this time contested for the Labour Party, which had been founded in 1916). [21] Thacker served for two terms until 1922 [22] and was Mayor of Christchurch until 1923. [23]

Thacker was defeated in the 1922 election by Tim Armstrong of the Labour Party. [24] The third candidate was W R Devereux, a land agent who stood for the Reform Party. [25] [26]

Armstrong successfully contested the 1925 and 1928 elections against Denis Franklyn Dennehy; his challenger stood for the Liberal Party in 1925, and for its successor, the United Party, in 1928. [27] [28] Armstrong was challenged by George Frederick Allen of the United Party in 1931, but Armstrong remained successful. [29] Allen was active in local affairs and was the headmaster of the Sumner District High School (1908–1933). [30] [31]

Armstrong was challenged in 1935 by S W Richardson, who was the official candidate for the United/Reform Coalition in 1935. [32] In 1938, Armstrong was challenged by K I Armour of the National Party. [33] Armstrong died in office on 8 November 1942 from heart disease. [34]

Armstrong's death triggered the 1943 by-election, which was held on 6 February. [35] [36] The by-election was contested by five candidates, including representatives from the Labour Party, the Labour breakaway party Democratic Labour Party and the National Party. [37] The election was won by the Labour candidate, Mabel Howard, and started her long parliamentary career, which included her becoming the first female cabinet minister in 1947. [38] Howard was confirmed later in 1943 in the general election, where her majority increased substantially (by over 17 percentage points). [39]

Christchurch East was abolished in 1946 [40] and re-created in 1996 for the MMP-era. Larry Sutherland, who had previously represented Avon, won the 1996 election. Sutherland retired at the 1999 election and Lianne Dalziel was first elected. Dalziel had previously represented Christchurch Central (1990–1996) and spent the next three years as a list MP. She is the current holder of the electorate. [41]

The Christchurch newspaper The Press reported on 20 April 2013 that Lianne Dalziel will challenge Bob Parker for the Christchurch mayoralty. [42] Dalziel maintained that she was not yet committed to standing, [43] and only formally confirmed on 19 June that she will contest the mayoralty. She confirmed that she will resign from Parliament, thus triggering a by-election in the Christchurch East electorate. [44] Dalziel resigned before the official results were announced. [45]

The by-election was since held on 30 November 2013 in the electorate. This was won by Labour's Poto Williams in a convincing victory despite the view that significant population changes since the 2011 Christchurch earthquake made the allegiance to Labour less certain. [46] [47] Williams held Christchurch East in the 2014 election against National's sitting list MP Jo Hayes. [48]

Since Tim Armstrong's 1922 election win, the electorate (for as long as it existed) has been held by Labour. [40]

Members of Parliament

Christchurch East has been represented by eight electorate MPs:

Key

  Independent     Liberal     Labour     National   

ElectionWinner
1871 election Jerningham Wakefield
(Electorate abolished 1875–1905, see City of Christchurch)
1905 election Thomas Davey
1908 election
1911 election
1914 election Henry Thacker
1919 election
1922 election Tim Armstrong
1925 election
1928 election
1931 election
1935 election
1938 election
1943 by-election Mabel Howard
1943 election
(Electorate abolished 1946–1996)
1996 election Larry Sutherland
1999 election Lianne Dalziel
2002 election
2005 election
2008 election
2011 election
2013 by-election Poto Williams
2014 election
2017 election

List MPs

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Christchurch East electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionWinner
2008 election Aaron Gilmore
2011 election
Mojo Mathers
2014 election
Jo Hayes
2017 election

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Christchurch East [49]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Poto Williams 18,43953.87+5.7816,41447.08+14.92
National Jo Hayes 10,95932.01−3.2112,31935.34−4.45
Green Cathy Sweet2,0185.90−4.232,3436.72−5.94
NZ First Melanie Mark-Shadbolt1,5294.472,1946.29−3.16
Legalise Cannabis Paula Lambert5471.60+0.161080.31+0.74
Conservative Chris Brosnan2420.71−3.311560.45−2.81
ACT Toni Severin1370.401160.33±0.00
Opportunities  8072.31
Māori  1333.82+3.42
Ban 1080  460.13+0.01
United Future  300.09−0.03
Democrats  190.05−0.01
Outdoors  150.04
People's Party  140.04
Internet  120.03−0.85
Mana  30.01−0.04
Informal votes360132
Total Valid votes34,23134,861
Turnout 35,20280.40 [50] +3.52
Labour holdMajority7,48021.86+8.99

2014 election

2014 general election: Christchurch East [51]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Poto Williams 15,22148.09-13.2110,45032.16+0.51
National Jo Hayes 11,14835.22+9.1612,92839.79-6.31
Green Mojo Mathers 3,20610.13+3.184,11312.66+0.98
Conservative Leighton Baker 1,2714.02+0.421,0583.26+1.11
Legalise Cannabis Robert Wilkinson4571.44+1.011860.57+0.07
Māori Tania Mataki1900.60+0.601290.40+0.11
United Future Sam Park1590.50+0.50740.23-0.33
NZ First  3,0699.45+3.19
Internet Mana  2860.88+0.66
ACT  1070.33-0.02
Ban 1080  380.12+0.12
Democrats  200.06-0.02
Civilian  190.06+0.06
Independent Coalition  110.03+0.03
Focus  10.00+0.00
Informal votes409141
Total Valid votes31,65232,489
Labour holdMajority4,07312.87-6.17

2013 by-election

The following table shows the final results of the by-election: [52]

2013 Christchurch East by-election

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the by-election.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list prior to the by-election.
Yellow background denotes the winner of the by-election, who was a list MP prior to the by-election.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Poto Williams 8,41461.39+5.86
National Matthew Doocey 3,57726.10-10.40
Green David Moorhouse9546.96+2.15
Conservative Leighton Baker 4943.60+1.74
Independent Sam Park780.57+0.57
Legalise Cannabis Paula Lambert590.43-0.48
ACT Gareth Veale580.42+0.42
Independent Adam Holland310.23+0.23
Independent Ian Gaskin200.15+0.15
Democrats Jenner Lichtwark200.15+0.15
Total Valid votes13,705
Informal votes210.15-1.63
Turnout 13,726
Labour holdMajority4,83735.29+16.25

2011 election

2011 general election: Christchurch East [53]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Lianne Dalziel 15,55955.54+2.619,10031.65-13.62
National Aaron Gilmore 10,22536.50+0.5513,25246.10+10.40
Green Mojo Mathers 1,3474.81-0.623,35911.68+4.45
Conservative Leighton Baker 5221.86+1.866172.15+2.15
Legalise Cannabis Michael Britnell2540.91-0.321450.50+0.16
United Future Johnny Miller1080.39-0.221600.56-0.39
NZ First  1,8016.26+2.34
ACT  1010.35-1.58
Māori  840.29-0.22
Mana  630.22+0.22
Alliance  280.10-0.08
Democrats  220.08+0.01
Libertarianz  170.06+0.02
Informal votes509228
Total Valid votes28,01528,977
Labour holdMajority5,33419.04+2.06

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 39,708 [54]

2008 election

2008 general election: Christchurch East [55]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Lianne Dalziel 17,96952.9215,58545.27
National Aaron Gilmore 12,20435.9412,28935.70
Green Mojo Mathers 1,8435.432,4897.23
Progressive Elspeth Sandys5751.696962.02
Legalise Cannabis Paula Lambert4171.231170.34
Kiwi Tony Le Cren3781.112690.78
United Future Maretta Solomon2040.603260.95
Alliance Paul Piesse 1190.35620.18
Independent Sevaschan Sam Park1140.34
Workers Party Paul Hopkinson900.27260.08
Democrats Nick McIlraith400.12240.07
NZ First  1,3523.93
ACT  6641.93
Bill and Ben  2100.61
Māori  1760.51
Family Party  680.20
Pacific  540.16
Libertarianz  140.04
RAM  50.01
RONZ  10.00
Informal votes267202
Total Valid votes33,95334,427
Labour holdMajority5,76516.98

2005 election

2005 general election: Christchurch East [56]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Lianne Dalziel 20,96960.3118,89353.44
National David Round8,99625.889,85127.86
Green Mary McCammon1,6984.881,9485.51
United Future Dianne Wilson1,2053.471,1763.33
Progressive Karen Silcock9262.669262.62
ACT John Peters4011.152770.78
Legalise Cannabis Kevin O'Connell2990.861010.29
Alliance Lynda Boyd1670.48980.28
Direct Democracy Kyle Chapman 630.18130.04
Anti-Capitalist Alliance Paul Hopkinson430.12
NZ First  1,6944.77
Destiny  1700.48
Māori  970.27
Christian Heritage  540.15
Democrats  180.05
Libertarianz  130.04
Family Rights  70.02
99 MP  60.02
RONZ  60.02
One NZ  50.01
Informal votes424186
Total Valid votes34,78735,353
Labour holdMajority11,97334.44

2002 election

2002 general election: Christchurch East [57]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Lianne Dalziel 19,78463.92+7.1216,14251.29+4.46
National Stephen Johnston4,92015.904,36813.88-10.39
Green Mary McCammon1,5575.032,0686.57+1.70
United Future Paul Duxbury1,5324.952,3947.61
ACT John Peters8412.721,2123.85+0.35
Progressive David Culverhouse8342.691,1713.72
Christian Heritage Judith Phillips5771.86-0.524411.40-1.00
Legalise Cannabis Michael Britnell5121.65-0.502220.71-0.69
Alliance Colin Pounder3151.024661.48-9.90
ACAPPhilip Ferguson790.26
NZ First  2,5328.05+5.81
ORNZ  4301.37
One NZ  150.05
Mana Māori  80.03+0.00
NMP  30.01+0.01
Informal votes389102
Total Valid votes30,95131,472
Labour holdMajority14,86448.02+13.11

1999 election

1999 general election: Christchurch East [58] [59]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Lianne Dalziel 18,15756.8015,08446.83+10.38
National John Knox6,99521.887,81624.26-2.21
Alliance Paul Piesse 2,1276.653,66511.38-6.11
Green Jacqui Wood1,2964.051,5684.87
Christian Heritage Judith Phillips7612.387742.40
Legalise Cannabis Michael Britnell6882.154491.39-0.54
Future NZ Chantelle Stiles6692.094561.42
ACT Alan Beecham6672.091,1273.500.47
NZ First Margaret Silverlock5281.657192.23-6.52
Natural Law Warwick Jones800.25580.180.06
United NZ  1430.44+0.04
Libertarianz  1310.41+0.40
South Island  730.23
Animals First  710.22+0.04
McGillicuddy Serious  360.11-0.05
One NZ  180.06
Mana Māori  110.03+0.02
Mauri Pacific  50.02
People's Choice  40.01
Republican  20.01
Freedom Movement 10.00
NMP  10.00
Informal votes513269
Total Valid votes31,96832,212
Labour holdMajority11,16234.92

1996 election

1996 general election: Christchurch East [60] [61] [62]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Larry Sutherland 11,17435.1711,67536.44
National Sue McKenzie8,21625.868,48026.47
Alliance Marie Venning7,30522.995,60117.48
NZ First Lem Pearse2,9709.352,8058.76
Legalise Cannabis Tim Shadbolt 1,3684.316181.93
ACT Jeffrey Buchanan5691.799713.03
McGillicuddy Serious Phil Clayton1050.33510.16
Natural Law Sean O'Connor610.19380.12
Christian Coalition  1,4944.66
United NZ  1280.40
Animals First  590.18
Progressive Green  480.15
Green Society 170.05
Advance New Zealand 140.04
Superannuitants & Youth 130.04
Ethnic Minority Party 80.02
Asia Pacific United 40.01
Mana Māori  40.01
Conservatives 30.01
Libertarianz  30.01
Te Tawharau 10.00
Informal votes36093
Total Valid votes31,76832,035
Labour win new seatMajority2,9589.31

1943 election

1943 general election: Christchurch East [39] [63]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Mabel Howard 8,911 64.39 +17.11
National Reginald Gilbert Brown3,37424.38-0.21
Democratic Labour Herman Theodore Schou [64] 1,2779.23-17.50
Real Democracy Fred Whiley2782.01
Majority5,53740.01-11.48
Informal votes2131.52
Registered electors 14,835
Turnout 14,05387.77+22.76

1943 by-election

1943 Christchurch East by-election [65] [66]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Mabel Howard 4,559 47.27 -28.47
Democratic Labour Horace Herring 2,57826.73
National Melville Lyons 2,37124.59+0.33
Independent Lincoln Efford1141.18
Independent Owen McKee220.23
Majority1,98120.54-30.95
Registered electors 14,835
Turnout 9,64465.01-26.42

1938 election

1938 general election: Christchurch East [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tim Armstrong 10,561 75.74 +2.25
National Ken Armour3,38224.26+1.49
Majority7,17951.49+0.76
Informal votes730.52-0.61
Registered electors 15,330
Turnout 14,01691.43

1935 election

1935 general election: Christchurch East [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tim Armstrong 8,299 73.49 +9.16
United/Reform Sydney Richardson [67] [68] 2,57122.77-12.90
Independent Berthold Ahlfeld4223.74
Majority5,72850.73+22.07
Informal votes1291.13

1931 election

1931 general election: Christchurch East [29]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tim Armstrong 7,196 64.33 +3.93
United George Frederick Allen3,99035.67-3.93
Majority3,20628.66+7.87

1928 election

1928 general election: Christchurch East [28]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tim Armstrong 6,564 60.40 -2.64
United Denis Franklyn Dennehy [69] 4,30439.60+2.64
Majority2,26020.79-5.28
Informal votes4884.30
Turnout 11,35684.93
Registered electors 13,371

1925 election

1925 general election: Christchurch East [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tim Armstrong 6,902 63.04 +15.83
Liberal Denis Franklyn Dennehy [69] 4,04736.96+1.57
Majority2,85526.08+5.00

1922 election

1922 general election: Christchurch East [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tim Armstrong 4,535 47.21 +7.75
Liberal Henry Thacker 3,40035.39-25.14
Reform William Russell Devereux [70] 1,67117.40
Majority1,13511.82-9.26

1919 election

1919 general election: Christchurch East [71]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Henry Thacker 5,572 60.54 +7.01
Labour Hiram Hunter 3,63239.46+10.65
Majority1,94021.08-3.64
Informal votes2162.29+1.39
Registered electors 11,666
Turnout 9,42080.75-7.47

1914 election

1914 general election: Christchurch East [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Henry Thacker 4,093 53.53 +20.85
Social Democrat Hiram Hunter 2,20328.81-2.08
Reform George Duncan Macfarlane1,35017.66
Majority1,89024.72+22.99
Informal votes700.91-0.43
Registered electors 8,747
Turnout 7,71688.213.79

1911 election

1911 general election: Christchurch East, first ballot [13] [72]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Liberal Henry Thacker 2,49232.68
Liberal Thomas Davey 2,36030.95-24.61
Labour Hiram Hunter 2,35630.89
Socialist Frederick Cooke 4185.48-2.57
Majority1321.73-24.87
Informal votes1031.33
Registered electors 9,155
Turnout 7,72984.42-0.24
1911 general election: Christchurch East, second ballot [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Thomas Davey 4,042 58.55 -24.61
Independent Liberal Henry Thacker 2,86141.45
Majority1,18117.11-24.87
Informal votes330.48
Registered electors 9,155
Turnout 6,93675.76

1908 election

1908 general election: Christchurch East, first ballot [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Thomas Davey 3,479 55.56 +13.94
Liberal–Labour James McCombs 1,81328.95
Socialist Frederick Cooke 5048.05+6.61
Conservative Charles Boxshall4667.44
Majority1,66626.60+17.65
Registered electors 7,427
Turnout 6,26284.31-0.35

1905 election

1905 general election: Christchurch East [73]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Thomas Davey 2,625 41.61
New Liberal Henry Toogood 2,06032.66
Liberal William Whitehouse Collins 1,53224.29
Socialist Frederick Cooke 911.44
Majority5658.96
Informal votes1241.93
Registered electors 7,597
Turnout 6,43284.66

1871 election

1871 general election: Christchurch East [6]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Jerningham Wakefield 169 52.32
Independent Andrew Duncan 15447.68
Majority154.64

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Representation Act 1870 (33 and 34 Victoriae 1870 No 15)". Parliamentary Counsel Office . Retrieved 9 August 2013.
  2. 1 2 "Electorate Boundaries". Electoral Commission . Retrieved 4 October 2013.
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  4. 1 2 3 Scholefield 1950, p. 156.
  5. Scholefield 1950, p. 145.
  6. 1 2 "Return of Mr E. J. Wakefield for Christchurch East". The Star (826). 19 January 1871. p. 2. Retrieved 2 May 2010.
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  38. McAloon, Jim. "Howard, Mabel Bowden 1894–1972". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 15 November 2011.
  39. 1 2 "The General Election, 1943". National Library. 1944. p. 2. Retrieved 5 August 2013.
  40. 1 2 Wilson 1985, p. 261.
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