East Coast (New Zealand electorate)

Last updated

East Coast electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election East Coast electorate, 2014.svg
East Coast electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

East Coast is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The electorate first existed from 1871 to 1893, and was recreated in 1999. The current MP for East Coast is Anne Tolley of the National Party, who has held office since 2005. [1]

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

Anne Tolley New Zealand politician

Anne Merrilyn Tolley is a New Zealand politician and member of the New Zealand House of Representatives representing the National Party. She previously served as Minister of Social Development, Minister of Local Government and Minister for Children during the Fifth National Government. From 2008 to 2011 she served as New Zealand's first woman Minister of Education.

Contents

Population centres

The electorate's main centres are Gisborne (32,529) and Tolaga Bay in the Gisborne Region; and Opotiki and Whakatane (18,800) in the eastern part of the Bay of Plenty Region. Wairoa, the northernmost town in the Hawke's Bay region, was excluded by the 2007 boundary changes.

History

The East Coast electorate was first established for the 5th Parliament in 1871. [2] William Kelly was the first elected representative; he held the seat until the end of the term in 1875. [3]

The fifth New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament.

1871 New Zealand general election New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1871 was held between 14 January and 23 February to elect 78 MPs across 72 electorates to the fifth session of the New Zealand Parliament. 41,527 electors were registered.

William Kelly (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

William Kelly was an Irish migrant to New Zealand, and became a businessman, soldier and politician.

The "most sensational electoral contest ever held in the East Coast" electorate was held in January 1876, when mysterious pieces of cardboard were distributed by supporters of George Read in Gisborne, which hotel bars accepted as legal tender. Read, George Morris and Kelly received 215, 206 and 185 votes, with another candidate coming a distant fourth. Morris petitioned against Read's election. A parliamentary committee of enquiry determined that Read had not broken any laws by approving the initiative, but the House of Representatives resolved that Read was to be unseated in favour of Morris, which happened later in 1876. [4] [5] This was the last election enquiry held by a parliamentary committee. Subsequently, these enquiries were held by the courts. [6]

1875–76 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1875–76 was held between 20 December 1875 and 29 January 1876 to elect a total of 88 MPs in 73 electorates to the 6th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 4 and 15 January 1876. A total of 56,471 voters were registered.

George Edward Read was a 19th-century Member of Parliament from the Gisborne Region of New Zealand.

George Morris (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

George Bentham Morris was a 19th-century Member of Parliament from the Gisborne and Bay of Plenty regions of New Zealand.

At the next election in 1879, Morris was defeated by Allan McDonald, who held the electorate until he resigned in 1884. [7]

1879 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1879 was held between 28 August and 15 September 1879 to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 7th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 8 September. A total of 82,271 (66.5%) European voters turned out to vote, plus 14,553 Māori voters. Following the election, John Hall formed a new government.

Allan McDonald (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

Allan McDonald was a 19th-century Member of Parliament from the Gisborne Region of New Zealand.

Samuel Locke won the resulting by-election and was confirmed a few months later at the 1884 general election. He served until the end of the term of the 9th Parliament in 1887. [8]

1884 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1884 was held on 22 July to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 9th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 21 July. A total number of 137,686 (60.6%) voters turned out to vote. In 11 seats there was only one candidate.

The 9th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand.

William Lee Rees stood unsuccessfully in this and subsequent by-elections and elections.

Andrew Graham won the 1887 general election. He resigned in 1889 before the end of the term. [9] Alexander Creighton Arthur won the resulting 1889 by-election. Arthur and Kelly (the electorate's first representative in 1871) contested the 1890 general election, and Kelly was successful by a small margin, with 1022 to 1008 votes in his favour. [10] He served until the end of the term in 1893, [3] after which the electorate was abolished, and was replaced by the Bay of Plenty and Waiapu electorates.

Members of Parliament

From 1871 to 1893, the electorate was represented by seven Members of Parliament. When the electorate was abolished the then current MP, William Kelly contested and won the new seat of Bay of Plenty. In 1999, the electorate was recreated from most of the Mahia, and part of the Bay of Plenty electorates. Since 1999 it has been represented by two MPs.

Key

  Independent     Liberal     Labour     National     United Future     Green   

ElectionWinner
1871 election William Kelly
1876 election George Read
George Morris 1
1879 election Allan McDonald
1881 election
1884 by-election Samuel Locke
1884 election
1887 election Andrew Graham
1889 by-election Alexander Creighton Arthur
1890 election William Kelly
electorate abolished, 1893-1999
1999 election Janet Mackey
2002 election
2005 election Anne Tolley
2008 election
2011 election
2014 election
2017 election

1 See History section above.

List MPs

The following table lists Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the East Coast electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionList Member
2002 election Judy Turner
2005 election Moana Mackey
Judy Turner
2008 election Catherine Delahunty
Moana Mackey
2011 election Moana Mackey
2017 election Kiri Allan
Gareth Hughes

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: East Coast [11]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Anne Tolley 17,51746.18−5.7417,01144.03-4.39
Labour Kiri Allan 12,71033.51+4.3814,15036.62+13.98
NZ First Julian Tilley2,9167.69+0.553,8209.89−1.90
Green Gareth Hughes 2,7057.13−0.571,7704.58−4.59
Opportunities Lesley Immink1,1423.019052.34
Māori Rihi Vercoe4681.232900.75−0.19
Independent Tekawe Terence Ratu520.14
Legalise Cannabis  1240.32−0.10
ACT  1060.27+0.04
Ban 1080  890.23−0.11
Conservative  670.17−3.89
Outdoors  370.10
United Future  320.08−0.14
Mana  200.05
People's Party  150.04
Internet  70.02
Democrats  40.01−0.07
Informal votes422188
Total Valid votes37,93238,636
National holdMajority4,80712.67−10.12

2014 election

2014 general election: East Coast [12]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Anne Tolley 18,07451.92+3.6517,15248.42−1.35
Labour Moana Mackey 10,14029.13−2.698,02222.64−1.23
Green Gavin Maclean2,6797.70−0.753,2489.17−1.43
NZ First Mere Takoko2,4857.14+3.064,17611.79+3.26
Conservative Rick Drayson7842.25−2.411,4384.06+1.04
Internet Patrick Salmon2590.74+0.74
Democrats Harry Alchin Smith860.25+0.25300.08+0.05
Internet Mana  4131.17+0.42 [lower-alpha 1]
Māori  3340.94−0.11
Legalise Cannabis  1500.42−0.03
Ban 1080  1220.34+0.34
ACT  820.23−0.71
United Future  780.22−0.69
Independent Coalition  170.05+0.05
Civilian  130.04+0.04
Focus  40.01+0.01
Informal votes305148
Total Valid votes34,81235,427
Turnout 35,57576.69+2.16
National holdMajority7,93422.79+6.33

2011 election

2011 general election: East Coast [13]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Anne Tolley 14,00348.27-4.1814,80449.77+2.15
Labour Moana Mackey 9,22931.82-0.217,10123.87-7.78
Green Darryl Monteith2,4528.45+3.093,15410.60+4.24
Conservative Kathy Sheldrake1,3524.66+4.668983.02+3.02
NZ First Tamati Reid1,1844.08-2.762,5388.53+2.68
United Future Martin Gibson3921.35-1.962710.91-1.28
Mana Val Irwin2560.88+0.882240.75+0.75
ACT John Norvill1400.48+0.482800.94-1.62
Legalise Cannabis  1330.45+0.14
Māori  3131.05-0.38
Alliance  100.03-0.03
Democrats  100.03-0.004
Libertarianz  90.03-0.01
Informal votes616233
Total Valid votes29,00829,976
National holdMajority4,77416.46-3.98

Electorate (as at 21 October 2011): 40,533 [14]

2008 election

2008 general election: East Coast [15]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Anne Tolley 16,46352.46+7.6515,16047.63+5.43
Labour Moana Mackey 10,05032.02-8.7810,07531.65-7.34
NZ First Brendan Horan 2,1476.84+3.351,8625.85-0.92
Green Catherine Delahunty 1,6845.37+1.752,0256.36+2.11
United Future Judy Turner 1,0403.31-0.576982.19-0.76
ACT  8162.56+1.87
Māori  4571.44-0.16
Progressive  1990.63-0.37
Bill and Ben  1750.55-
Kiwi  1150.36-
Legalise Cannabis  990.31+0.12
Family Party  830.26-
Alliance  190.06+0.00
Libertarianz  130.04+0.02
Democrats  120.04-0.03
Workers Party  100.03-
Pacific  70.02-
RONZ  50.02+0.01
RAM  20.01-
Informal votes246130
Total Valid votes31,38431,832
National holdMajority6,41320.43+16.44

2005 election

2005 general election: East Coast [16]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Anne Tolley 13,66644.80+12.1713,07042.20+20.43
Labour Moana Mackey 12,44740.81-10.8312,07638.99-1.68
United Future Judy Turner 1,1863.89-1.709162.96-3.51
Green Catherine Delahunty 1,1043.62-1.351,3164.25-1.45
NZ First Joe Glen1,0643.492,0986.77-7.11
Māori John Harré5891.934941.59
ACT Bill Sadler4461.46-0.572140.69-4.17
Destiny  3361.08
Progressive  3091.00-0.68
Legalise Cannabis  600.19-0.32
Christian Heritage  200.06-1.01
Democrats  200.06
Alliance  170.05-1.12
Family Rights  80.03
Libertarianz  60.02
99 MP  50.02
One NZ  30.01
Direct Democracy  20.01
RONZ  20.01
Informal votes266125
Total Valid votes30,50230,972
Turnout 31,097
National gain from Labour Majority1,2193.99-15.02

2002 election

2002 general election: East Coast
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Janet Mackey 14,51951.64+1.9111,68740.67+2.79
National Leanne Jensen-Daines9,17632.636,25521.77-9.77
United Future Judy Turner1,5735.591,8596.47
Green Catherine Delahunty 1,3984.971,6385.70+1.44
ACT Ian Swan5712.03-0.211,3964.86-1.68
Alliance Gavin MacLean3881.38-5.213361.17-7.92
Christian Heritage Tania Maria Maukau-Teare-Shelford2690.963081.07-1.40
One NZ David Moat2240.80830.29
NZ First  3,98913.88+8.88
ORNZ  5211.81
Progressive  4841.68
Legalise Cannabis  1470.51-0.42
Mana Māori  290.10-0.07
NMP  30.01+0.01
Informal votes541122
Total Valid votes28,11828,735
Labour holdMajority5,34319.01+4.73

1999 election

1999 general election: East Coast [17] [18]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Janet Mackey 13,39149.7310,34837.91
National Matthew Parkinson9,54635.458,60831.54
Alliance Gavin MacLean1,7756.592,4819.09
NZ First Gray Eatwell8443.131,3665.00
Christian Heritage Richard Rangihuna6452.406752.47
ACT Ian Swan6042.241,7846.54
Mana Wahine Harangi Manaena-Biddle760.28
Te Tawharau Anton Kerekere460.17
Green  1,1644.26
Legalise Cannabis  2530.93
Future NZ  2250.82
Libertarianz  980.36
United NZ  740.27
Animals First  500.18
Mana Māori  470.17
McGillicuddy Serious  330.12
Mauri Pacific  240.09
Natural Law  230.08
One NZ  230.08
Republican  80.03
Freedom Movement  70.03
People's Choice  30.01
NMP  10.00
South Island  10.00
Informal votes642273
Total Valid votes26,92727,296
Labour win new seatMajority384514.28

1890 election

1890 general election: East Coast [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal William Kelly 1,022 50.34
Conservative Alexander Creighton Arthur 1,00849.65
Majority140.68
Turnout 2,03068.65
Registered electors 2,957

1889 by-election

1889 East Coast by-election [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Alexander Creighton Arthur 676 52.00
Independent William Lee Rees 62448.00
Majority524.00
Turnout 1300

1887 election

1887 general election: East Coast [21] [22]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Andrew Graham 744 45.17
Independent Allan McDonald 58335.40
Independent Michael Gannon [23] 32019.43
Majority1619.78
Turnout 1647
Registered electors 2271

1884 by-election

1884 East Coast by-election [24] [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Samuel Locke 509 45.49
Independent Michael Gannon [23] 31528.15
Independent William Lee Rees 29526.36
Turnout 1119
Majority19417.34

1881 election

1881 general election: East Coast [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Allan McDonald 441 37.25
Independent Samuel Locke 42235.64
Independent Captain T. W. Porter18015.20
Independent Michael Gannon [23] [27] 14111.91
Majority191.60
Turnout 1184
Registered electors 1524

Table footnotes

  1. 2014 Internet Mana swing is relative to the votes for Mana in 2011; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.

Notes

  1. New Zealand Parliament - Anne Tolley MP
  2. Scholefield 1950, p. 157.
  3. 1 2 Scholefield 1925, p. 107.
  4. "East Coast (New Zealand electorate)". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage.
  5. "East Coast Election Report". Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXXII, Issue 5261. 23 August 1876. p. 3. Retrieved 4 September 2011.
  6. Mackay 1949, p. 354.
  7. Scholefield 1925, p. 111.
  8. Scholefield 1925, p. 110.
  9. Scholefield 1925, p. 96.
  10. Mackay 1949, p. 355.
  11. "Official Count Results -- East Coast (2017)". Electoral Commission. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  12. Electoral Commission (10 October 2014). "Official Count Results – East Coast" . Retrieved 28 January 2016.
  13. East Coast results, 2011
  14. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 21 October 2011. Retrieved 28 October 2011.
  15. Election result: East Coast, 2008
  16. "Official Count Results -- East Coast (2005)". Electoral Commission. 1 October 2005. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  17. "Official Count Results (1999) – Electoral Votes for registered parties by electorate". NZ Electoral Commission. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  18. "Official Count Results (1999) – Candidate Vote Details". NZ Electoral Commission. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  19. "The General Election, 1890". National Library. 1891. Retrieved 25 February 2012.
  20. "The East Coast Election". The Press . XLVI (7425). 17 December 1889. p. 5.
  21. "Tuesday, December 17, 1889". The Daily Telegraph (5709). 17 December 1889. p. 2. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  22. Cooper, G. S. (1887). The General Election, 1887. National Library. p. 1. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  23. 1 2 3 Oliver, Steven. "Kate Wyllie". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  24. "Declaration of the Poll". Poverty Bay Herald. 23 June 1884.
  25. "The East Coast Election". Hawke's Bay Herald. 20 June 1884.
  26. Cooper, G. S. (1882). Votes Recorded for Each Candidate. Government Printer. p. 1. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  27. "Telegraphic". Hawke's Bay Herald . XXI (6097). 15 October 1881. p. 3. Retrieved 18 January 2019.

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References