Selwyn (New Zealand electorate)

Last updated

Selwyn electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election Selwyn electorate, 2014.svg
Selwyn electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Selwyn is a current electorate in the New Zealand House of Representatives, composed of towns on the outskirts of Christchurch city. The electorate was first formed for the 1866 election and has been abolished three times during its history. It was last re-established for the 2008 election and has since been held by Amy Adams for the National Party.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

Christchurch City in South Island, New Zealand

Christchurch is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand and the seat of the Canterbury Region. The Christchurch urban area lies on the South Island's east coast, just north of Banks Peninsula. It is home to 404,500 residents, making it New Zealand's third-most populous city behind Auckland and Wellington. The Avon River flows through the centre of the city, with an urban park located along its banks.

1866 New Zealand general election New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1866 was held between 12 February and 6 April to elect 70 MPs to the fourth term of the New Zealand Parliament.

Contents

Region and population centres

The electorate is mainly rural, stretching from the Southern Alps to the Banks Peninsula, its borders broadly defined by the Rakaia River in the south and the Waimakariri River in the north. Major towns include Lincoln, Prebbleton, and Darfield, with smaller towns such as Tai Tapu, Leeston, Dunsandel, and Akaroa. The electorate also includes parts of Christchurch city's territorial authority.

Southern Alps Mountain range on the South Island in New Zealand

The Southern Alps / Kā Tiritiri o te Moana is a mountain range extending along much of the length of New Zealand's South Island, reaching its greatest elevations near the range's western side. The name "Southern Alps" generally refers to the entire range, although separate names are given to many of the smaller ranges that form part of it.

Banks Peninsula peninsula in New Zealand

Banks Peninsula is a peninsula of volcanic origin on the east coast of the South Island of New Zealand. It has an area of approximately 1,150 square kilometres (440 sq mi) and encompasses two large harbours and many smaller bays and coves. The South Island's largest city, Christchurch, is immediately north of the peninsula.

Rakaia River river in New Zealand

The Rakaia River is in the Canterbury Plains in New Zealand's South Island. The Rakaia River is one of the largest braided rivers in New Zealand. The Rakaia River has a mean flow of 203 cubic metres per second (7,200 cu ft/s) and a mean annual seven-day low flow of 87 m3/s (3,100 cu ft/s). In the 1850s, European settlers named it the Cholmondeley River, but this name lapsed into disuse.

History

Existence and changes to area

An electorate called Selwyn existed between 1866 and 1919. A Selwyn electorate also existed between 1946 and 1972 and again from 1978 until it was absorbed by Rakaia for the first MMP election in 1996. [1] The latest version of the Selwyn electorate was created for the 2008 election. This followed a review of electoral boundaries conducted after the 2006 Census, because of a general northwards population movement in the South Island. Even though the number of South Island electorates is fixed, the decline in the population of electorates from Rakaia south has resulted in the boundaries of electorates from Invercargill north to Rakaia shifting further northwards.

1919 New Zealand general election Election in New Zealand

The New Zealand general election of 1919 was held on Tuesday, 16 December in the Māori electorates, and on Wednesday, 17 December in the general electorates to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 20th session of the New Zealand Parliament. A total number of 560,673 (80.5%) voters turned out to vote.

1946 New Zealand general election

The 1946 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 28th term. It saw the governing Labour Party re-elected, but by a substantially narrower margin than in the three previous elections. The National Party continued its gradual rise.

1972 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1972 was held on 25 November to elect MPs to the 37th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Labour Party, led by Norman Kirk, defeated the governing National Party.

Due to the rapid growth of Selwyn relative to Christchurch (which lost population after the earthquakes), the 2013 redistribution had Selwyn losing Halswell and Westmorland to Port Hills and Harewood to Waimakariri while regaining the towns of Rakaia and Chertsey back from Rangitata. [2] Data from the 2018 census showed Selywn's population had continued to grow – it had the largest discrepancy of any electorate – and so the electorate would need to lose further area for the 2020 boundaries. [3]

Halswell Place

Originally a separate village, Halswell is now a residential suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand, located 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) southwest of Cathedral Square on State Highway 75.

Westmorland, New Zealand Place

Westmorland is an outer suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand. It is situated mostly on a hillside and is a recent development of the city, dating back to the late 1970s. It is still under development, with the end of Pentonville Close being recently settled with modern family homes typical of middle to upper-middle class New Zealanders, predominantly in the usual bungalow style, called Worsley Estate. There is a road nearby called 'Worsleys Road'. However this is not connected to Worsley Estate at this time. Currently there is a lot of development happening at the top of the hill, going under the name of 'Westmorland Heights'. This is the final stage of the Westmorland development, and is expected to be completed in approx 2020, adding 250 homes to the suburb of Westmorland.

Port Hills (New Zealand electorate)

Port Hills is a parliamentary electorate of New Zealand created for the 2008 general election. Ruth Dyson of the Labour Party had previously held the Banks Peninsula electorate since the 1999 election that was largely replaced by Port Hills, and Dyson is to this day the area's representative. The Port Hills electorate is mostly urban, and lost the more rural Banks Peninsula areas of the old electorate to the Selwyn electorate that was also formed for the 2008 election.

Voting history

The dominant topic for the 1875 election was the abolition of the Provinces. William Reeves, the incumbent, favoured the retention of the provincial system of government, while his opponent, Cecil Fitzroy, was an abolitionist. Fitzroy, who was 31 years old and 20 years Reeves' junior, narrowly won the election. [4] [5] Edward Lee acted as returning officer for the election. [6]

1875–1876 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1875–1876 was held between 20 December 1875 and 29 January 1876 to elect a total of 88 MPs in 73 electorates to the 6th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 4 and 15 January 1876. A total of 56,471 voters were registered.

Provinces of New Zealand administrative areas of New Zealand between 1841-1876

The provinces of the Colony of New Zealand existed as a form of sub-national government. Established in 1841, each province had its own legislature and was built around the six original planned settlements or "colonies". By 1873 the number of provinces had increased to nine, but they had become less isolated from each other and demands for centralised government arose. In 1875 the national parliament decided to abolish the provincial governments, and they came to an end in 1876. They were superseded by counties, which were later replaced by territorial authorities.

William Reeves (journalist) New Zealand politician

William Reeves was a New Zealand 19th century journalist and politician. He was the father of the author and politician the Hon. William Pember Reeves.

In the 1879 election, John Hall was returned unopposed. [7] In the 1881 election, Hall beat R. Lockhead by 467 to 169 votes. [8] [9]

1879 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1879 was held between 28 August and 15 September 1879 to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 7th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 8 September. A total of 82,271 (66.5%) European voters turned out to vote, plus 14,553 Māori voters. Following the election, John Hall formed a new government.

John Hall (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

Sir John Hall was a New Zealand politician who served as the 12th Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1879 to 1882. Born in Kingston upon Hull, England, the third son of George Hall, a captain in the navy. At the age of ten he was sent to school in Switzerland and his education continued in Paris and Hamburg. After returning to England and being employed by the Post Office, at the age of 27 he decided to emigrate. He was also Mayor of Christchurch.

1881 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1881 was held on 8 and 9 December in the Māori and European electorates, respectively, to elect 95 MPs to the 8th session of the New Zealand Parliament.

In the 1890 election, Alfred Saunders, Thomas Hamilton Anson, and William Jerrington Popple received 536, 485 and 237 votes, respectively. [10]

The electorate is one of the National Party's safest seats. National have held the seat, whenever it has existed since it was first recreated in 1946. The incumbent MP is Amy Adams, who has received between 60% and 70% of the electorate vote in the four elections since its latest recreation in 2008. In 2011, the candidate for the other major New Zealand party, Labour, received less than 11% of the electoral vote and came third, behind the Greens in the 2011 election. In that election, the only polling booths where Adams didn't receive the most votes were Arthur's Pass and Diamond Harbour.

Members of Parliament

Key:

  Independent     Conservative     Reform     Liberal     National     Green   

ElectionWinner
1866 election Edward Stevens
1871 election William Reeves
1875 election Cecil Fitzroy
1879 election John Hall
1881 election
1883 by-election Edward Lee
1884 by-election Edward Wakefield
1884 election
1887 election John Hall
1890 election Alfred Saunders
1893 election
1896 election Cathcart Wason
1899 election Charles Hardy
1902 election
1905 election
1908 election
1911 election William Dickie
1914 election
(Electorate abolished 1919–1946)
1946 election John McAlpine
1949 election
1951 election
1954 election
1957 election
1960 election
1963 election
1966 election Colin McLachlan
1969 election
(Electorate abolished 1972–1978, see Rakaia)
1978 election Colin McLachlan
1981 election Ruth Richardson
1984 election
1987 election
1990 election
1993 election
1994 by-election David Carter
(Electorate abolished 1996–2008,
see Banks Peninsula & Rakaia)
2008 election Amy Adams
2011 election
2014 election
2017 election

List MPs

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Selwyn electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionWinner
2011 election Eugenie Sage

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Selwyn [11]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Amy Adams 28,68665.86-4.1126,00359.00-4.58
Labour Tony Condon9,04720.77+9.2211,50826.11+13.14
Green Chrys Horn2,7726.36-5.192,3395.30-5.60
NZ First Lindy Michelle Palmer1,3453.08-2.152,4405.53-1.42
Opportunities Nicky Snoyink1,2702.911,1312.56
ACT Brian Davidson1980.45+0.212010.45+0.06
Conservative  87
Legalise Cannabis  79
Māori  75
Ban 1080  41
Outdoors  36
United Future  32
People's Party  11
Internet  6
Democrats  3
Mana  2
Informal votes23574
Total Valid votes43,55344,068
National holdMajority19,639

2014 election

2014 general election: Selwyn [12]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Amy Adams 24,62569.97+0.8322,80963.58+0.93
Green Peter Selwyn Hill4,06411.55+1.373,91010.90-0.54
Labour Gordon John Dickson3,83510.90-4.374,65412.97-3.15
NZ First Bill Woods1,8415.23+1.692,4946.95+2.20
Conservative Roger Clibborn6191.76-0.121,2533.49+1.03
Māori Sheryl Gardyne1290.37+0.371110.31-0.06
ACT Paul Gilbert830.24+0.241390.39-0.52
Internet Mana  1840.51+0.37
Legalise Cannabis  1200.33+0.00
United Future  870.24-0.45
Ban 1080  780.22+0.22
Civilian  160.04+0.04
Democrats  100.03-0.01
Focus  50.01+0.01
Independent Coalition  50.01+0.01
Informal votes18265
Total Valid votes35,19635,875
National holdMajority20,56158.42+4.54

2011 election

2011 general election: Selwyn [13]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Amy Adams 24,96369.14+8.6523,08662.65+7.74
Labour Jo McLean5,51215.27-14.545,94216.12-9.49
Green Eugenie Sage 3,67410.18+10.184,21511.44+3.91
NZ First Bill Woods1,2773.54+3.541,7504.75+1.71
Conservative Wilton Gray6771.88+1.889062.46+2.46
ACT  3360.91-2.77
United Future  2560.69-0.45
Māori  1370.37-0.04
Legalise Cannabis  1230.33+0.07
Mana  520.14+0.14
Alliance  240.07+0.02
Democrats  130.04+0.02
Libertarianz  110.03+0.01
Informal votes526192
Total Valid votes36,10336,851
National holdMajority19,45153.88+23.20

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 46,937 [14]

2008 election

2008 general election: Selwyn [15]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Amy Adams 21,83660.4920,14154.91
Labour David Coates10,76129.819,39525.61
Progressive Philippa Main1,3163.656721.83
Independent Bill Woods6031.67
ACT Ivor Watson5391.491,3503.68
Family Party Samuel Dennis4931.371410.38
Kiwi Eleanor Williamson2960.821910.52
United Future Victoria Norman2530.704211.15
Green  2,7617.53
NZ First  1,1153.04
Bill and Ben  2010.55
Māori  1510.41
Legalise Cannabis  970.26
Alliance  170.05
Libertarianz  80.02
Democrats  70.02
Workers Party  50.01
RAM  30.01
Pacific  20.01
RONZ  10.00
Informal votes409155
Total Valid votes36,09736,679
National win new seatMajority11,07530.68

1994 by-election

A by-election was held following the resignation of Ruth Richardson. [16]

1994 Selwyn by-election
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National David Carter 8,90642.32
Alliance John Wright 8,48840.33
Labour Marian Hobbs 2,17310.33
NZ First Tim Shadbolt 1,1655.54
Christian Heritage Rosemary Francis1820.86
NORML Warren Bryson390.19
Kiwis Against Further ImmigrationBruce Annan290.14
McGillicuddy Serious Tim Owens260.12
Natural Law Warwick Jones220.10
NZ CoalitionKieron Daok100.05
Christ's Ambassadors UnionVictor Bryer20.01
Majority4181.99
Turnout 21,042

1987 election

1987 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ruth Richardson 10,720 54.9 +4.9
Labour Bill Woods7,75839.8+8.8
Democrats J R E Palmer6403.3-1.5
Independent NationalG P Dennis1941.0+1.0
Wizard PartyC I Walker1771.0+1.0
Majority2,96216.1
Turnout 89.7
Registered electors 22,160

1984 election

1984 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ruth Richardson 10,076 50.0 +2.6
Labour C E Manning6,24731.0-5.8
NZ Party M R MacDonald2,85914.2+14.2
Social Credit J D Gribben9774.8-11.0
Majority3,82919.0
Turnout 94.8
Registered electors 20,455

1981 election

1981 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ruth Richardson 9,496 47.4 +2.1
Labour Bill Woods7,36736.8-1.8
Social Credit J D Gribben3,15715.8+2.0
Majority2,12910.6
Turnout 90.2
Registered electors 22,293

1978 election

1978 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Colin McLachlan 8,335 45.3
Labour Bill Woods7,10338.6
Social Credit J D Gribben2,53713.8
Values A G Fairweather4112.3
Majority1,2326.7
Turnout 66.3
Registered electors 27,882

1966 election

1966 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Colin McLachlan 7,374 52.5 -3.9
Labour T K Campbell4,77734.0+0.9
Social Credit M McConnell1,90313.5+7.0
Majority2,59718.5
Turnout 85.3
Registered electors 16,542

1963 election

1963 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National John McAlpine 8,164 56.4 +0.1
Labour Francis Edward Smith4,79333.1-3.4
Social Credit R H Morton9426.5-0.7
Liberal E L May5724.0+4.0
Majority3,37123.3
Turnout 88.1
Registered electors 16,534

1960 election

1960 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National John McAlpine 8,096 56.3 +3.1
Labour John Palmer5,25736.5-3.5
Social Credit R H Morton1,0427.2+1.4
Majority2,83919.8
Turnout 90.0
Registered electors 16,074

1957 election

1957 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National John McAlpine 7,564 53.2 +3.1
Labour S S M Cook5,83341.0+10.4
Social Credit R H Morton8235.8-13.5
Majority1,73112.2
Turnout 92.0
Registered electors 15,501

1954 election

1954 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National John McAlpine 6,473 50.1 -5.8
Labour D Clinton3,85230.6-13.5
Social Credit T A Ward2,38719.3+19.3
Majority2,52119.5
Turnout 89.3
Registered electors 14,612

1951 election

1951 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National John McAlpine 8,738 55.9 +1.5
Labour Jim Barclay 6,90244.1-1.5
Majority1,83611.8
Turnout 91.3
Registered electors 17,170

1949 election

1949 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National John McAlpine 8,205 54.4 +2.6
Labour Alan Sharp6,87845.6-2.6
Majority1,3278.8
Turnout 94.7
Registered electors 16,035

1946 election

1949 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National John McAlpine 6,970 51.8
Labour Alan Sharp6,49848.2
Majority4723.6
Turnout 93.2
Registered electors 14,463

1899 election

1899 general election: Selwyn [17] [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Charles Hardy 1,308 38.96
Liberal John Rennie1,16834.79
Liberal John Barrett45413.52
Liberal Kenneth Wilson42712.72
Majority1404.17-1.57
Turnout 3,35774.93-10.05
Registered electors 4,480

1896 election

1896 general election: Selwyn
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Cathcart Wason 1,676 52.87
Independent Alfred Saunders 1,49447.13
Majority1825.74
Turnout 3,17084.99
Registered electors 3,730

1890 election

1890 general election: Selwyn [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Alfred Saunders 536 42.61
Conservative Thomas Hamilton Anson48538.55
Liberal William Jerrington Popple23718.84
Majority514.05
Turnout 1,25862.49
Registered electors 2,013

1884 by-election

1884 Selwyn by-election [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Edward Wakefield 479 60.25
Independent John McLachlan 31639.75
Majority16320.50
Turnout 795+177

1883 by-election

1883 Selwyn by-election [21] [22] [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Edward Lee 258 41.75
Independent Edward Richardson 22035.60
Independent John McLachlan 14022.65
Turnout 618
Majority386.15

1875 election

1875 general election: Selwyn [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Cecil Fitzroy 244 51.48
Independent William Reeves 23048.52
Majority142.95
Turnout 47468.30
Registered electors 694

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 91–96.
  2. Report of the Representation Commission 2014 (PDF). Representation Commission. 4 April 2014. p. 10. ISBN   978-0-477-10414-2 . Retrieved 26 September 2014.
  3. Cooke, Henry (23 September 2019). "Census 2018: New Zealand to gain one new seat in 2020 election". Stuff. Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  4. "Mr. C. A. Fitzroy at Doyleston". The Press . XXIV (3218). 23 December 1875. p. 2. Retrieved 11 July 2015.
  5. 1 2 "Selwyn Poll". The Press . XXIV (3224). 31 December 1875. p. 2. Retrieved 11 July 2015.
  6. "Election Notices". The Press . XXIV (3212). 16 December 1875. p. 4. Retrieved 11 July 2015.
  7. "Selwyn nomination". Star (3553). 30 August 1879. p. 3. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  8. "The General Election". Otago Daily Times (6190). 10 December 1881. p. 2. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  9. "The General Elections". The Star (4249). 3 December 1881. p. 3. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  10. "Election Notices". The Press . XLVII (7731). 10 December 1890. p. 1. Retrieved 24 June 2012.
  11. "Official Count Results -- Selwyn". Wellington: New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  12. 2014 election results
  13. 2011 election results
  14. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  15. 2008 election results [ permanent dead link ]
  16. "Part XIV - Selwyn By-election" (PDF). Electoral Commission . Retrieved 13 July 2013.
  17. "The General Election, 1899". Wellington: Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives. 19 June 1900. p. 2. Retrieved 12 February 2014.
  18. "Untitled". The Press . LVI (10516). 30 November 1899. p. 8. Retrieved 18 February 2014.
  19. "The General Election, 1890". National Library. 1891. Retrieved 25 February 2012.
  20. "Selwyn Election". The Press . XL (5755). 28 February 1884. p. 3. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  21. "Selwyn Election". New Zealand Times. 20 April 1883.
  22. "Selwyn Election". New Zealand Mail. 14 April 1883.
  23. "The Result of the Selwyn Election". New Zealand Times. 20 April 1883.

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References