John Wright (New Zealand politician)

Last updated

  1. Mr. John Wright at executive.govt.nz
  2. 1 2 Who's Who 1996, p. 95.
  3. 1 2 Rapson, Bevan (22 April 1991). "Democrats Pick New Leader". The New Zealand Herald . p. 12.
  4. "Electorate Candidate and Party Votes Recorded at Each Polling Place - Waimakariri" (PDF). Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  5. "Part III - Party Lists of Successful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 14 June 2013.
  6. Young, Audrey (December 1999). "Happy at the tail of the top". The New Zealand Herald . p. 12 September 2020.
  7. "New appointments to Transfund and Transit Boards".
  8. "David Benson-Pope might have nowhere else to go". 15 December 2009.

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References

John Wright
8th Leader of the Democratic Party
In office
22 April 1991 25 November 2001
Party political offices
Preceded by Leader of the Social Credit Party
1991–2001
Succeeded by