Jill Ovens

Last updated

Jill Ovens in 2006 Jill Ovens Alliance Conference 2006.jpg
Jill Ovens in 2006

Jill Ovens is a New Zealand unionist and former political candidate. She was co-leader of the Alliance party before changing her allegiance to the Labour Party.

Contents

Union leader

She previously had a long history involved in New Zealand Unions, having served as the president of the Association of Staff in Tertiary Education and was heavily involved in the Council of Trade Unions (CTU) Women's Council Convenor and attended the ICFTU World Women's Conference as one of two CTU delegates. [1]

Alliance Party

Ovens was an Alliance candidate in Auckland's Mount Albert electorate in the 1999 and the 2002 elections, both times contesting the seat against Labour leader Helen Clark. On the party list, she was ranked 28th and 12th, respectively. Ovens became president of the Alliance party in 2004. [2] She had previously been critical of the party's leader, Matt McCarten, for his close associations with the Māori Party. For the 2005 election she unsuccessfully contested the Manukau East electorate and was ranked first on the party list, having been elected a co-leader with Paul Piesse.

Labour Party

In 2006 she resigned as co-leader and left the Alliance party. After being elected the northern secretary of the Service & Food Workers Union in succession to Darien Fenton, she decided to join the Labour Party as it is affiliated with the Union. [2] She is currently an Auckland/Northland regional representative on the Labour Party's Council. [3]

Current activities

Since her election to the SFWU Ovens has been occasionally blogging on left wing social media websites and supporting union activities primarily based in Auckland. In December 2014 Ovens helped lead a walkout of food service workers at Auckland City Hospital. [4] [5]

Related Research Articles

The New Zealand Labour Party, or simply Labour, is a centre-left political party in New Zealand. The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism, while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice. The party participates in the international Progressive Alliance.

Sandra Lee-Vercoe New Zealand politician

Sandra Rose Te Hakamatua Lee-Vercoe is a former New Zealand politician and diplomat. She served as deputy leader of the Alliance party and was later High Commissioner to Niue.

The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand is a left-wing political party in New Zealand. Like many Green parties around the world it has four organisational pillars: ecology, social responsibility, grassroots democracy, and nonviolence. It also accepts the Treaty of Waitangi as the founding document of New Zealand and recognises Māori as tangata whenua.

The Alliance was a left-wing political party in New Zealand. It was formed at the end of 1991 by the linking of four smaller parties. The Alliance positioned itself as a democratic socialist alternative to the centre-left New Zealand Labour Party. It was influential throughout the 1990s, but suffered a major setback after its founder and leader, Jim Anderton, left the party in 2002, taking with him several of its members of parliament (MPs). After the remaining MPs lost their seats in the 2002 general election, some commentators predicted the demise of the party.

Jim Anderton New Zealand politician

James Patrick Anderton was a New Zealand politician who led a succession of left-wing parties after leaving the Labour Party in 1989.

Jeanette Fitzsimons New Zealand politician

Jeanette Mary Fitzsimons was a New Zealand politician and environmentalist. She was the co-leader of the Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand from 1995 to 2009, and was a Member of Parliament from 1996 to 2010.

Laila Harré New Zealand politician

Laila Jane Harré is a New Zealand politician and trade unionist. She was the first leader of the Internet Party, and stood for Parliament in the 2014 general election through the Helensville electorate. From 1996 to 2002, she was a Member of Parliament for the Alliance party, briefly leading that party after the group experienced a schism in 2002.

Margaret Ann Hartley, known as Ann Hartley, is a former New Zealand member of parliament, a former Mayor of North Shore City, and a member of the Labour Party.

Paul Piesse New Zealand politician

Paul Egerton Piesse is a former co-leader of the Alliance, a New Zealand political party, and union activist.

Epsom (New Zealand electorate) Current New Zealand electorate

Epsom is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. As of the 2017 general election, its member of parliament is David Seymour.

Nikki Kaye New Zealand politician

Nicola Laura Kaye is a New Zealand politician who has served as Deputy Leader of the New Zealand National Party and Deputy Leader of the Opposition since 22 May 2020. She is the member of the New Zealand Parliament for the Auckland Central electorate. In January 2013, she was appointed to the Cabinet by Prime Minister John Key, giving her the portfolios of Food Safety, Civil Defence, and Youth Affairs, and Associate Minister of Education and Immigration. From September 2016 to early 2017 she was on sick leave from the House of Representatives, after a breast cancer diagnosis. She returned to Parliament in early 2017 to resume full duties.

2014 New Zealand general election

The 2014 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 20 September 2014 to determine the membership of the 51st New Zealand Parliament.

2010 Mana by-election New Zealand by-election

A by-election was held in the New Zealand electorate of Mana on 20 November 2010. The seat was vacated by former Labour Pacific Island Affairs Minister Luamanuvao Winnie Laban, who announced her resignation from the New Zealand Parliament on 10 August 2010 following her appointment as Assistant Vice Chancellor Pasifika at Victoria University. According to provisional results, the by-election was won by Kris Faafoi, also of the Labour Party.

2017 New Zealand general election Election on 23 September 2017

The 2017 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 23 September 2017 to determine the membership of the 52nd New Zealand Parliament. The previous parliament was elected on 20 September 2014 and was officially dissolved on 22 August 2017. Voters elected 120 members to the House of Representatives under New Zealand's mixed-member proportional (MMP) voting system, a proportional representation system in which 71 members were elected from single-member electorates and 49 members were elected from closed party lists. Around 3.57 million people were registered to vote in the election, with 2.63 million (79.8%) turning out. Advance voting proved popular, with 1.24 million votes cast before election day, more than the previous two elections combined.

Priyanca Radhakrishnan politician

Priyanca Radhakrishnan is an Indian-born-New Zealand politician who was elected to the New Zealand parliament at the 2017 general election as a representative of the New Zealand Labour Party.

Parmjeet Parmar New Zealand politician

Kushmiita Parmjeet Kaur Parmar is an Indian-born-New Zealand politician who was elected to the New Zealand parliament at the 2014 general election as a representative of the New Zealand National Party.

2016 Mount Roskill by-election New Zealand by-election

A by-election was held in the Mount Roskill electorate on 3 December 2016. The seat was vacated following the resignation of Phil Goff after he was elected Mayor of Auckland.

Paul Eagle New Zealand politician

Tahere Paul Eagle is a New Zealand politician and member of the New Zealand House of Representatives for the Rongotai electorate. He was previously a Wellington City Councillor and Deputy Mayor, and was the first person of Māori descent to enter the office of Deputy Mayor of Wellington.

Ginny Andersen New Zealand politician

Virginia Ruby Andersen is a New Zealand politician and Member of Parliament in the House of Representatives for the Labour Party.

Damian Francis Light is a New Zealand politician who was the leader of the United Future party from August 2017 until the party's dissolution in November 2017. He became party leader following the resignation of Peter Dunne. Light had previously served as the president of the party. He was the first openly gay leader of a political party in New Zealand.

References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 6 February 2006. Retrieved 6 August 2006.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. 1 2 Young, Audrey (6 August 2006). "Ovens switches to Labour after winning union vote". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 11 April 2017.
  3. "Party Information". New Zealand Labour Party . Retrieved 4 August 2017.
  4. "Auckland Hospital workers walk over outsource call". Stuff.co.nz. 15 December 2014. Retrieved 8 April 2017.
  5. "GUEST BLOG: Jill Ovens – Auckland Hospital worker cuts – Democracy the loser « The Daily Blog". Thedailyblog.co.nz. 17 December 2014. Retrieved 8 April 2017.