Banks Peninsula (New Zealand electorate)

Last updated

Banks Peninsula is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate which initially existed from 1996 to 2008, and was later recreated in 2020 ahead of the 2020 election. [1] It was held by National's David Carter for the initial term, and then by Labour's Ruth Dyson from 1999 to 2008. [2] The seat is currently held by Labour's Tracey McLellan.

Contents

Population centres

The Banks Peninsula electorate, as defined in 2020, includes some of southern Christchurch, with suburbs such as Oaklands, Somerfield, Cashmere, Woolston, Halswell, Heathcote, and Sumner. It also includes some towns immediately south of Christchurch such as Lyttelton, and all of Banks Peninsula itself including the town of Akaroa.

History

The 1996 election was notable for the significant change of electorate boundaries, based on the provisions of the Electoral Act 1993. [3] Because of the introduction of the mixed-member proportional (MMP) electoral system, the number of electorates had to be reduced, leading to significant changes. More than half of the electorates contested in 1996 were newly constituted, and most of the remainder had seen significant boundary changes. In total, 73 electorates were abolished, 29 electorates were newly created (including Banks Peninsula), and 10 electorates were recreated, giving a net loss of 34 electorates. Banks Peninsula replaced the previous Lyttelton electorate.

In boundary changes for the 2008 general election, the electorate lost its rural population centres to the newly formed Selwyn, and became a solely urban electorate that was renamed Port Hills. Labour's Ruth Dyson retained Port Hills for all four elections with a greater lead than she had seen for Banks Peninsula. Dyson is not seeking reelection in 2020. [4]

In the boundary review of 2019/2020, the Representation Commission decided to make large changes to the boundaries of Port Hills, taking area in Halswell and parts of Bromley out and adding Banks Peninsula in, to manage large changes in population in the Christchurch and Selwyn areas. The electorate was also re-recreated as Banks Peninsula. [5] [6] [7] At its first election, the electorate was won easily by Labour's Tracey McLellan amidst the nationwide Labour landslide.

Members of Parliament

Key

  National     Labour     Alliance     Green   

ElectionWinner
1996 election David Carter
1999 election Ruth Dyson
2002 election
2005 election
(Electorate abolished 2008–2020; see Port Hills)
2020 election Tracey McLellan

List MPs

ElectionWinner
1996 election Rod Donald
Ruth Dyson
1999 election David Carter
Rod Donald
2002 election David Carter
Rod Donald
2005 election David Carter
Rod Donald [note 1]
(Electorate abolished 2008–2020; see Port Hills)
2020 election Eugenie Sage
  1. Rod Donald was elected from the Green Party list, but died before he was sworn into the 48th New Zealand Parliament. Nándor Tánczos was next on the list and so took Donald's place.

Election results

2020 election

2020 general election: Banks Peninsula [8]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Tracey McLellan 25,39351.1125,09150.23
National Catherine Chu12,23724.6310,45320.92
Green Eugenie Sage 6,22212.527,08914.19
ACT David Fox1,7153.453,4786.96
Opportunities Ben Atkinson1,5183.051,0832.16
NZ First Denis O'Rourke 6791.369911.98
New Conservative Caleb Honiss6391.286261.25
Advance NZ Tiamara Williams5061.014240.84
Māori  1440.28
Legalise Cannabis  1330.26
ONE  690.13
Sustainable NZ  410.08
Outdoors  370.07
Social Credit  220.04
Vision NZ  150.03
TEA  100.02
Heartland  40.01
Informal votes772241
Total Valid votes49,68149,951
Labour win new seatMajority13,15626.48

2005 election

2005 election: Banks Peninsula [9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Ruth Dyson 17,63943.83-1.1316,35540.10-0.13
National David Carter 15,71639.05+5.3315,69738.48+16.89
Green Rod Donald 4,54211.29-0.414,25510.43+0.20
United Future Robin Loomes9842.45-1.111,4343.52-3.91
Progressive Phil Clearwater8982.23+0.448081.98-0.62
ACT Alex Mann3460.86-1.454431.09-6.42
Alliance Andrew McKenzie1180.29-0.36390.10-1.18
NZ First  1,4213.48-2.92
Destiny  810.20+0.20
Māori  800.20+0.20
Legalise Cannabis  610.15-0.32
Christian Heritage  450.11-0.92
Libertarianz  190.05+0.05
Democrats  170.04+0.04
One NZ  100.02-0.02
99 MP  90.02+0.02
Direct Democracy  50.01+0.01
RONZ  50.01+0.01
Family Rights  40.01+0.01
Informal votes342112
Total Valid votes40,24340,788
Turnout 41,00686.07+3.71
Labour holdMajority1,9234.78-6.32

2002 election

2002 election: Banks Peninsula [10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Ruth Dyson 16,23344.96+3.5614,70440.23+2.88
National David Carter 12,17633.72+0.037,89221.59-12.10
Green Rod Donald 4,22311.70+1.423,73910.23+2.93
United Future Stephanie McEwin1,2843.56+2.55a2,7177.43+5.78a
ACT Paul King8342.31+0.432,7447.51+0.77
Progressive Phil Clearwater6461.79+1.799522.60+2.60
Christian Heritage Gerald Barker4761.32-0.493781.03-1.02
Alliance Francis (Val) McClimont2340.65-3.294691.28-6.30
NZ First  2,3406.40+4.30
ORNZ  4241.16+1.16
Legalise Cannabis  1720.47-0.29
One NZ  130.04+0.01
Mana Māori  50.01+0.003
NMP  20.01+0.01
Informal votes32696
Total Valid votes36,10636,551
Turnout 36,74382.36
Labour holdMajority4,05711.10+7.22
a United Future swing is compared to the combined 1999 results of United NZ and Future NZ, who merged in 2000.

1999 election

1999 election: Banks Peninsula [11] [12]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Ruth Dyson 15,47541.4014,01837.35
National Red x.svgN David Carter 14,02037.5112,64333.69
Green Rod Donald 3,84210.282,7397.30
Alliance Maevis Watson1,4743.942,8447.58
ACT Paul King7041.882,5306.74
Christian Heritage Rosemary Francis6751.817692.05
NZ First Charlie Crofts5101.367882.10
Future NZ Simon Melville Hadfield3791.014091.09
Independent Ann Lewis2020.54
Natural Law David Lovell-Smith980.26480.13
Legalise Cannabis  2860.76
United NZ  2120.56
Libertarianz  950.25
South Island  560.15
Animals First  390.10
McGillicuddy Serious  300.08
One NZ  120.03
Mana Māori  40.01
Freedom Movement30.01
Republican  30.01
People's Choice 20.01
Mauri Pacific  10.00
NMP  10.00
Informal votes390237
Total Valid votes37,37937,532
Labour gain from National Majority1,4553.88

1996 election

1996 general election: Banks Peninsula [13] [14] [15]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National David Carter 15,69441.1314,28437.30
Labour Ruth Dyson 11,31629.6610,59727.67
Alliance Rod Donald 7,23518.965,35213.97
NZ First Ross Gluer1,7824.672,8397.41
Christian Coalition Neville Chamberlain8082.121,6504.31
ACT Jeff Lopas5711.502,3786.21
Independent Ann Lewis3510.92
McGillicuddy Serious Elizabeth Holland1990.52810.21
Natural Law David Lovell-Smith1760.46840.22
Dominion WorkersAnton Bailey250.07
Legalise Cannabis  5111.33
United NZ  3360.88
Progressive Green 720.19
Animals First  430.11
Green Society 240.06
Mana Māori  150.04
Ethnic Minority Party 120.03
Superannuitants & Youth  100.03
Advance New Zealand 30.01
Libertarianz  30.01
Conservatives 20.01
Asia Pacific United 10.00
Te Tawharau 00.00
Informal votes22888
Total Valid votes38,15738,297
National win new seatMajority4,37811.47

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References

  1. https://vote.nz/boundary-review-2019-2020/
  2. "Hon Ruth Dyson". New Zealand Parliament. 16 October 2019. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  3. "Electoral Act 1993". Act No. 87 of 17 August 1993. Archived from the original on 10 July 2015. Retrieved 30 June 2015.
  4. "The Battle of Banks-Peninsula: two fresh faces contest a newly competitive seat". Stuff (Fairfax). 12 January 2020.
  5. "Untitled (interactive map)". vote.nz. New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  6. Law, Tina (20 November 2019). "Boundary changes could swing Labour's safe Port Hills seat toward National". The Press . Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  7. "Report of the Representation Commission 2020" (PDF). 17 April 2020.
  8. New Zealand Electoral Commission (6 November 2020). "Banks Peninsula". Electionresults.govt.nz. Retrieved 8 November 2020.
  9. "Official Count Results Banks Peninsula". Elections New Zealand. 1 October 2005. Retrieved 19 January 2010.
  10. "Official Count Results Banks Peninsula". Elections New Zealand. 10 August 2002. Retrieved 17 January 2010.
  11. "Official Count Results (1999) – Electoral Votes for registered parties by electorate". NZ Electoral Commission. Retrieved 24 September 2017.[ permanent dead link ]
  12. "Official Count Results (1999) – Candidate Vote Details". NZ Electoral Commission. Retrieved 24 September 2017.[ permanent dead link ]
  13. "Electorate Candidate and Party Votes Recorded at Each Polling Place - Banks Peninsula, 1996" (PDF). Retrieved 8 July 2013.
  14. "Part III - Party Lists of Successful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2013.
  15. "Part III - Party Lists of unsuccessful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2013.