Lyttelton (New Zealand electorate)

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Lyttelton is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It existed from 1853 to 1890, and again from 1893 to 1996, when it was replaced by the Banks Peninsula electorate.

Contents

Population centres

The New Zealand Constitution Act 1852, passed by the British government, allowed New Zealand to establish a representative government. The initial 24 New Zealand electorates were defined by Governor George Grey in March 1853. Lyttelton was one of the initial single-member electorates. [1]

The electorate was in the eastern suburbs of Christchurch, New Zealand, and included the port of Lyttelton.

History

The electorate was created in 1853 and existed until 1890. In the 1890 election, the Akaroa electorate covered the town of Lyttelton. [2] The Lyttelton electorate was re-established for the 1893 election and existed until 1996, the first mixed-member proportional (MMP) election, when it was included in the Banks Peninsula electorate.

The nomination meeting for the first election was held on 15 August 1853 at the Reading Room in Lyttelton. The first election was held two days later on a Wednesday at the Resident Magistrate's Office in Lyttelton, with Charles Simeon as Resident Magistrate acting as the returning officer. [3] The election was contested by Christopher Edward Dampier, the solicitor of the Canterbury Association, and James FitzGerald, who in the previous month had been elected Canterbury's first Superintendent. FitzGerald won the election by 55 votes to 45. [4] In the 1855 election, FitzGerald was returned unopposed. [5] FitzGerald represented the electorate until 1857, when he resigned due to ill health. [6]

Crosbie Ward won the resulting by-election in May 1858. [7] Ward was re-elected unopposed on 25 January 1861. [8] [9]

Edward Allen Hargreaves won the 1866 election. [10] He resigned in April 1867. [11] Hargreaves was succeeded by George Macfarlan, who was elected unopposed in a 1 July 1867 by-election. [12] Macfarlan died in office on 9 October 1868. [13]

John Thomas Peacock won the 2 November 1868 by-election. [14] At the 1871 election, Peacock was re-elected unopposed. [15] He held the seat until April 1873, when was promoted to the New Zealand Legislative Council (the upper house). [16] [17] He resigned from Parliament on 5 April 1873. [18] The resulting by-election on 19 May 1873 was won by his brother in law, Henry Richard Webb, who beat Hugh Murray-Aynsley. [19]

At the 28 December 1875 general election, the Lyttelton electorate was contested by the same two candidates as the 1873 by-election, but this time, Murray-Aynsley was successful. [20] [21] Murray-Aynsley was defeated by Harry Allwright in the 1879 general election held on 4 September. [22]

John Joyce represented Lyttelton from 1887 to 1890 and from 1893 to 1899. The electorate was held from 1913 by James McCombs for the Social Democrats and then for Labour; he was succeeded by his wife when he died, and then his son when she also died.

The 1925 general election was contested by Melville Lyons and the incumbent, James McCombs. [23] The original count resulted in a tie of 4,900 votes each. The returning officer gave his casting vote to Lyons and declared him elected. A recount was demanded, and on 3 December 1925, an amended result of 4890 votes for Lyons and 4884 votes for McCombs was determined, with the differences in the counts explained by counting informal votes in a different way. [24] Lyons' election was declared void on 13 March 1926, and the previous holder, McCombs, was restored as the holder of the electorate. [23] The 22nd Parliament had its first sitting on 16 June 1926, hence Lyons had not been sworn in before his election was declared void. [25]

The 1931 election had a close result, with McCombs just 32 votes ahead of the United–Reform Coalition candidate, Christchurch civil engineer Frederick Willie Freeman. [26] [27]

The seat has been held by National and Norman Kirk transferred to the safer (for Labour) Sydenham seat in 1969, just as his predecessor Harry Lake transferred to the safer (for National) Fendalton seat in 1960.

Election results

Key

  Independent     Liberal     Social Democrat     Labour     Reform     National   

ElectionWinner
1853 election James FitzGerald
1855 election
1858 by-election Crosbie Ward
1861 election
1866 election Edward Hargreaves
1867 by-election George Macfarlan
1868 by-election John Thomas Peacock
1871 election
1873 by-election Henry Richard Webb
1875 election Hugh Murray-Aynsley
1879 election Harry Allwright
1881 election
1884 election
1887 election John Joyce
(Electorate abolished 1890–1893; see Akaroa)
1893 election John Joyce
1896 election
1899 election George Laurenson
1902 election
1905 election
1908 election
1911 election
1913 by-election James McCombs
1914 election
1919 election
1922 election
1925 election Melville Lyons
13 March 1926 [nb 1] James McCombs
1928 election
1931 election
1933 by-election Elizabeth McCombs
1935 by-election Terry McCombs
1935 election
1938 election
1943 election
1946 election
1949 election
1951 election Harry Lake
1954 election
1957 election Norman Kirk
1960 election
1963 election
1966 election
1969 election Tom McGuigan
1972 election
1975 election Colleen Dewe
1978 election Ann Hercus
1981 election
1984 election
1987 election Peter Simpson
1990 election Gail McIntosh
1993 election Ruth Dyson
(Electorate abolished 1996; see Banks Peninsula)

Table footnotes:

  1. 1925 election result declared invalid in 1926 and McCombs reinstated.

Election results

1993 election

1993 general election: Lyttelton [28]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ruth Dyson 9,616 40.60
National David Carter 8,93937.74
Alliance Ann Lewis3,72915.74+6.98
NZ First Ross Gluer8293.50
Christian Heritage Bruce Burnett3751.58
Natural Law David Lovell-Smith1930.81
Majority6772.85
Turnout 23,68187.71+0.55
Registered electors 26,997

1990 election

1990 general election: Lyttelton [29]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Gail McIntosh 9,368 41.13
Labour Peter Simpson 9,30040.83-15.13
NewLabour Ann Lewis1,9968.76
Green Cliff Mason1,7607.72
Democrats Audrey Evans Scott1410.61
Social Credit Louise Moore1370.60
McGillicuddy Serious Tom Wells740.32
Majority680.29
Turnout 22,77687.16-1.37
Registered electors 26,129

1987 election

1987 general election: Lyttelton [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Peter Simpson 12,362 55.96
National Philip Hall8,62939.06
Democrats Michael Bruce8133.68-0.45
NZ Party A J Roberts1870.84
Imperial British Conservative P A Swafford960.43
Majority3,73316.90
Turnout 22,08788.53-4.11
Registered electors 24,948

1984 election

1984 general election: Lyttelton [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ann Hercus 11,994 51.52 -2.47
National D G Graham7,03130.20
NZ Party Ross Burrows3,29114.13
Social Credit Michael Bruce9624.13-5.86
Majority4,96321.32+3.34
Turnout 23,27892.64+1.91
Registered electors 25,127

1981 election

1981 general election: Lyttelton [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ann Hercus 11,685 53.99 +5.43
National Simon Stamers-Smith7,79336.01
Social Credit Michael Bruce2,1639.99
Majority3,89217.98+11.40
Turnout 21,64190.73+19.93
Registered electors 23,852

1978 election

1978 general election: Lyttelton [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ann Hercus 10,493 48.56
National Colleen Dewe 9,07041.98-5.90
Social Credit Louise Moore1,2945.98
Values H Chambers5772.67
Independent John Victor Pierson1530.70
Tory Suzanne Sadler170.07
Majority1,4236.58
Turnout 21,60470.80-15.09
Registered electors 30,510

1975 election

1975 general election: Lyttelton [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Colleen Dewe 10,107 47.88
Labour Tom McGuigan 9,10843.15-13.73
Values Peter Heal1,3006.15
Social Credit Errol Crockett5922.80
Majority9994.73
Turnout 21,10785.89-5.69
Registered electors 24,574

1972 election

1972 general election: Lyttelton [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Tom McGuigan 11,078 56.88 +9.68
National John Blumsky 7,84340.27
Social Credit Joe Pounsford4722.42
Liberal Reform W J Jamieson520.26
New Democratic Robert Ramsay Scarth310.15
Majority3,23516.61+15.05
Turnout 19,47691.58-0.18
Registered electors 21,266

1969 election

1969 general election: Lyttelton [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Tom McGuigan 8,800 47.20
National Peter de Latour8,50845.63+5.83
Social Credit Terry Huggins1,0425.58
Majority2921.56
Turnout 18,64291.76+4.12
Registered electors 20,315

1966 election

1966 general election: Lyttelton [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Norman Kirk 9,045 52.00 -2.04
National Peter de Latour6,92439.80
Social Credit Cliff Munnings1,4248.18+1.11
Majority2,12112.19-2.97
Turnout 17,39387.64-4.51
Registered electors 19,844

1963 election

1963 general election: Lyttelton [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Norman Kirk 9,539 54.04 +6.35
National Tom Flint6,86238.87
Social Credit Cliff Munnings1,2497.07+0.81
Majority2,67715.16+13.60
Turnout 17,65092.15-0.53
Registered electors 19,153

1960 election

1960 general election: Lyttelton [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Norman Kirk 7,910 47.65 -1.00
National Jim Hay7,65046.08
Social Credit Cliff Munnings1,0406.26
Majority2601.56-1.86
Turnout 16,60092.68-1.93
Registered electors 17,911

1957 election

1957 general election: Lyttelton [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Norman Kirk 8,064 48.65
National Harry Lake 7,49745.23+2.94
Social Credit Wilfrid Owen 1,0146.11-12.21
Majority5673.42
Turnout 16,57594.61-3.01
Registered electors 17,519

1954 election

1954 general election: Lyttelton [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Harry Lake 6,175 42.29 -8.15
Labour Tom McGuigan 6,15142.12
Social Credit Wilfrid Owen 2,67518.32
Majority240.16-0.73
Turnout 14,60191.90+2.24
Registered electors 15,887

1951 election

1951 general election: Lyttelton [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Harry Lake 7,480 50.44
Labour Terry McCombs 7,34749.55-3.81
Majority1330.89
Turnout 14,82789.36-2.51
Registered electors 16,591

1949 election

1949 general election: Lyttelton [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Terry McCombs 7,758 53.36 -1.50
National Richard Ralph Beauchamp6,78046.63
Majority9786.72-4.30
Turnout 14,53891.87+1.55
Registered electors 15,824

1946 election

1946 general election: Lyttelton [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Terry McCombs 7,682 54.86 +3.05
National Ted Taylor 6,31945.13+3.77
Majority1,54311.02+0.57
Turnout 14,00190.32+0.82
Registered electors 15,500

1943 election

1943 general election: Lyttelton [34] [35]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Terry McCombs 6,817 51.81 -9.58
National Ted Taylor 5,44341.37
Democratic Labour Malcolm Frederick Nottage7815.94
Real Democracy Leonard Alexander Jarden1170.89
Informal votes1240.930.53
Majority1,37410.44-12.34
Turnout 13,28284.04-9.10
Registered electors 15,805

1938 election

1938 general election: Lyttelton [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Terry McCombs 8,04161.392.68
National Isaac Wilson5,05738.61
Majority2,98422.78-0.61
Informal votes530.40-0.19
Turnout 13,15193.147.87
Registered electors 14,120

1935 election

1935 general election: Lyttelton [37] [38]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Terry McCombs 6,965 58.71 0.06
United/Reform Seton Fulton Marshall4,19035.32
Democrat Benjamin Henry Riseley7095.98
Majority2,77523.394.49
Informal votes710.59
Turnout 11,93585.27
Registered electors 13,997

1935 by-election

1935 Lyttelton by-election [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Terry McCombs 5,437 58.65
United/Reform Melville Lyons 3,68539.75
Independent Labour Edward Hills1031.11
IndependentG.S. Hamilton460.50
Majority175218.9-6.75
Turnout 9,27167.43 [40]

1933 by-election

1933 Lyttelton by-election [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Elizabeth McCombs 6,344 61.66 11.89
United/Reform Frederick Freeman3,67535.72-13.76
Independent Labour Edward Hills2692.61
Majority2,66925.94+25.65
Turnout 10,28874.98

1931 election

1931 general election: Lyttelton [26] [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour James McCombs 5,404 49.77
Reform Frederick Willie Freeman5,37249.47
Independent William Ling Page830.76
Majority320.29
Informal votes710.65
Turnout 10,93086.57
Registered electors 12,625

1928 election

1928 general election: Lyttelton [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour James McCombs 5,022 46.53 -3.52
Reform John Beanland 3,03628.13
United William Thomas Lester2,73425.33
Majority1,98618.4018.29
Informal votes880.81-0.26
Turnout 10,88090.27-0.85
Registered electors 12,053

1925 election

1925 general election: Lyttelton [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour James McCombs [nb 1] 4,900 50.06 -3.39
Reform Melville Lyons 4,88949.94
Majority110.11-6.78
Informal votes1061.07-0.19
Turnout 9,89591.120.73
Registered electors 10,859

1922 election

1922 general election: Lyttelton [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour James McCombs 4,758 53.45 12.27
Reform Robert Macartney4,14446.5513.30
Majority6146.90-1.03
Informal votes1141.26-0.71
Turnout 9,01690.406.99
Registered electors 9,974

1919 election

1919 general election: Lyttelton [46]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour James McCombs 2,999 41.18 -20.31
Reform Robert Macartney2,42233.26
Liberal William Thomas Lester1,27717.53
Liberal Harry Ell 5858.03
Majority5777.92-15.06
Informal votes1471.980.49
Turnout 7,43083.41-0.44
Registered electors 8,908

1914 election

1914 general election: Lyttelton [47]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Social Democrat James McCombs 4,276 61.49 9.24
Reform Malcolm Miller2,67838.51-9.24
Majority1,59822.9818.48
Informal votes1051.49
Turnout 7,05983.85
Registered electors 8,419

1913 by-election

1913 Lyttelton by-election: First ballot
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Social Democrat James McCombs 2,075 42.20
Reform Malcolm Miller 1,560 31.73
Liberal James Laurenson92218.75
Independent Liberal Henry Thacker 2635.35
Independent William Radcliffe971.97
Turnout 4,917
1913 Lyttelton by-election: Second ballot
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Social Democrat James McCombs 2,628 52.25
Reform Malcolm Miller2,40247.75
Majority2264.50
Turnout 5,030
Social Democrat gain from Liberal Swing

1911 election

1911 general election: Lyttelton, first ballot [48]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal George Laurenson 4,160 66.66 9.76
Independent Liberal Colin Cook2,08133.34
Majority2,07933.3119.51
Informal votes791.250.47
Turnout 6,32083.850.27
Registered electors 7,537

1908 election

1908 general election: Lyttelton, first ballot [49]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal George Laurenson 3,682 56.90 9.21
Independent Liberal Henry Thacker 2,78943.10
Majority89313.80-7.47
Informal votes510.78
Turnout 6,52283.58-2.92
Registered electors 7,803

1905 election

1905 general election: Lyttelton [50] [51]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal George Laurenson 2,515 47.69 -30.09
Liberal William Radcliffe1,39326.41
Conservative Charles Lord Russell96718.34
Conservative Samuel R. Webb 3997.57
Majority1,12221.27-34.28
Informal votes1212.24
Turnout 5,39586.506.15
Registered electors 6,237

1902 election

1902 general election: Lyttelton [52]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal George Laurenson 3,041 77.77 2.50
Liberal William Rollitt86922.23
Majority2,17255.555.01
Turnout 3,91080.356.26
Registered electors 4,866

1899 election

1899 general election: Lyttelton [53]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal George Laurenson 2,700 75.27
Conservative William Jacques88724.73
Majority1,81350.54
Informal votes
Registered electors 4,841
Turnout 3,58774.10

1896 election

1896 general election: Lyttelton [54]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Joyce 1,734 49.83 -18.12
Conservative William Jacques1,28837.01
Independent Liberal Samuel R. Webb 45813.16
Majority44612.82
Informal votes
Registered electors 4,285 [55]
Turnout

1893 election

1893 general election: Lyttelton [56] [57]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Joyce 1,895 67.95
Liberal Edwin Blake 85430.62
Independent John Moncrieff Douglass401.43
Majority1,04137.33
Informal votes
Turnout 2,78977.71
Registered electors 3,589

1887 election

1887 general election: Lyttelton [58]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent John Joyce 613 59.75
Independent Harry Allwright 41340.25-7.49
Majority20019.4913.67
Turnout 1,02674.08-11.05
Registered electors 1,385

1884 election

1884 general election: Lyttelton [59]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Harry Allwright 328 47.74 13.35
Independent Samuel R. Webb 28841.929.25
Independent E. M. Clissold7110.33
Majority405.824.36
Turnout 68785.135.87
Registered electors 807

1881 election

1881 general election: Lyttelton [60]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Harry Allwright 259 34.40 -17.78
Independent Edward Richardson 24832.93
Independent Samuel R. Webb 24632.67
Majority111.46-2.89
Turnout 75379.26-1.47
Registered electors 950

1879 election

1879 general election: Lyttelton [61] [62]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Harry Allwright 192 52.17
Independent Hugh Murray-Aynsley 17647.83-8.68
Majority164.35-8.66
Informal votes51.34
Turnout 37380.744.34
Registered electors 462

1875 election

1875 general election: Lyttelton [62] [21]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Hugh Murray-Aynsley 139 56.50 7.98
Independent Henry Richard Webb 10743.50-7.98
Majority3213.0110.06
Turnout 24676.40
Registered electors 322

1873 by-election

1873 Lyttelton by-election [63]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Henry Richard Webb 122 51.48
Independent Hugh Murray-Aynsley 11548.52
Turnout 237
Majority72.95

1866 election

1866 general election: Town of Lyttelton [10] [64]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Edward Hargreaves 107 60.80
Independent Henry Sewell 6939.20
Majority3821.59
Turnout 17648.09
Registered electors 366

1853 election

1853 general election: Town of Lyttelton [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent James FitzGerald 55 55.0%
Independent Christopher Edward Dampier 4545.0%
Majority1010.0%
Turnout 10080.0%
Registered electors 125

Footnotes

  1. Melville Lyons was elected for the Reform Party, originally the votes were equal (4900), then a recount found for Lyons. But on appeal his election was declared void on 13 March 1926, and the previous holder, James McCombs, was restored as the electorate representative.

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 29f.
  2. "Akaroa-cum-Lyttelton". The Star (7029). 6 December 1890. Retrieved 19 April 2010.
  3. "Public Notice". Lyttelton Times . III (134). 30 July 1853. p. 1. Retrieved 18 September 2013.
  4. 1 2 "Lyttelton Election". Lyttelton Times . III (137). 20 August 1853. p. 6. Retrieved 15 June 2015.
  5. "The Lyttelton Times". Lyttelton Times . V (328). 2 December 1855. p. 6. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  6. McIntyre, W. David. "FitzGerald, James Edward". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 1 May 2010.
  7. Rice, Geoffrey W. "Ward, Crosbie". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 1 May 2010.
  8. "Canterbury". Wellington Independent. XVI (1495). 8 February 1861. p. 5. Retrieved 1 May 2010.
  9. "Local Intelligence". Lyttelton Times . XV (857). 26 January 1861. p. 4. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  10. 1 2 "Lyttelton election". The Press . IX (1036). 5 March 1866. p. 2. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  11. Scholefield 1950, p. 112.
  12. "Lyttelton Election". Press. XII (1450). 2 July 1867. p. 2. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  13. Scholefield 1950, p. 122.
  14. "Election of a Member for Lyttelton". The Star (148). 2 November 1868. p. 2. Retrieved 14 April 2010.
  15. "Lyttelton election". The Star (823). 16 January 1871. p. 3. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  16. "The Evening Post. Thursday, April 3, 1873". The Evening Post . IX (44). 3 April 1873. p. 2. Retrieved 15 April 2010.
  17. "Local and General". The Star (1600). 7 April 1873. p. 2. Retrieved 15 April 2010.
  18. "Local and General". The Star (1599). 5 April 1873. p. 2. Retrieved 15 April 2010.
  19. "Lyttelton Election". The Star (1634). 20 May 1873. p. 3. Retrieved 15 April 2010.
  20. "Lyttelton Polling". The Star (2424). Lyttelton. 29 December 1875. p. 2. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  21. 1 2 "Lyttelton polling". The Press . XXIV (3222). 29 December 1875. p. 2. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  22. "The General Elections". The Star (3558). 5 September 1879. p. 2. Retrieved 13 March 2010.
  23. 1 2 Wilson 1985, p. 213.
  24. "Lyttelton Recount". The Evening Post . CX (135). 4 December 1925. p. 9. Retrieved 9 November 2011.
  25. Wilson 1985, p. 141.
  26. 1 2 The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 3. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  27. "General Election, 1931". Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser. LV (5635). 27 November 1931. p. 2. Retrieved 22 November 2014.
  28. Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1993. p. 56.
  29. Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1990. p. 58.
  30. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Norton 1988, p. 264.
  31. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Norton 1988, p. 263.
  32. "The General Election, 1949". National Library. 1950. pp. 1–5, 8. Retrieved 3 January 2014.
  33. "The General Election, 1946". National Library. 1947. pp. 1–11, 14. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  34. "Public Notices". The Press . LXXIX (24077). 13 October 1943. p. 1. Retrieved 15 May 2017.
  35. McRobie 1989, p. 92.
  36. "The General Election, 1938". National Library. 1939. p. 3. Retrieved 23 November 2019.
  37. "Maori Seats". The Evening Post . CXX (135). 4 December 1935. p. 12. Retrieved 23 November 2019.
  38. McRobie 1989, p. 88.
  39. "Labour Wins". The Evening Post . CXX (22). 25 July 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 13 November 2011.
  40. "Issue of Writ". The Evening Post . CXIX (149). 26 June 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 13 November 2011.
  41. "Lyttelton Seat". The Evening Post . CXVI (70). 20 September 1933. p. 10. Retrieved 29 January 2011.
  42. "Notice of Nominations Received and Polling Places Appointed". Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser. LV (5634). 24 November 1931. p. 2. Retrieved 22 November 2014.
  43. Skinner, W. A. G. (1929). The General Election, 1928. Government Printer. p. 3. Retrieved 23 November 2019.
  44. Skinner, W. A. G. (1926). The General Election, 1925. Government Printer. p. 3. Retrieved 23 November 2019.
  45. Hislop, J. (1923). The General Election, 1922. Government Printer. p. 5. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  46. Hislop, J. (1921). The General Election, 1919. National Library. p. 4. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  47. Hislop, J. (1915). The General Election, 1914. National Library. p. 21. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  48. Mansfield, F. W. (1912). The General Election, 1911. National Library. p. 4. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  49. "Election notices". Lyttelton Times . CXIX (14848). 21 November 1908. p. 7. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  50. The General Election, 1905. National Library. 1906. p. 4. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  51. "To-day's election: the candidates". Lyttelton Times . CXIV (13925). 6 December 1905. p. 3. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  52. The General Election, 1902. National Library. 1903. p. 2. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  53. "The General Election, 1899". Wellington: Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives. 19 June 1900. p. 2. Retrieved 1 November 2012.
  54. "Electoral District of Lyttelton". The Press . LIII (9594). 7 December 1896. p. 1. Retrieved 14 January 2014.
  55. McRobie 1989, p. 64.
  56. The General Election, 1893. Government Printer. 1894. p. 2. Retrieved 19 November 2013.
  57. "The General Election". Otago Daily Times . 28 November 1893. p. 6. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  58. Cooper, G. S. (1887). The General Election, 1887. National Library. p. 3. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  59. Cooper, G. S. (1884). The General Election, 1884. National Library. p. 2. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  60. Cooper, G. S. (1882). Votes Recorded for Each Candidate. Government Printer. p. 3. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  61. "The general elections: Lyttelton election". The Star (3558). 5 September 1879. p. 2. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  62. 1 2 McRobie 1989, p. 44.
  63. "Lyttelton Election". The Star (1634). 20 May 1873. p. 3. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  64. McRobie 1989, p. 36.

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