Grey Lynn (New Zealand electorate)

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Grey Lynn is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate, in the city of Auckland. It existed from 1902 to 1978, and was represented by nine Members of Parliament.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

Auckland Metropolitan area in North Island, New Zealand

Auckland is a city in the North Island of New Zealand. Auckland is the largest urban area in the country, with an urban population of around 1,628,900. It is located in the Auckland Region—the area governed by Auckland Council—which includes outlying rural areas and the islands of the Hauraki Gulf, resulting in a total population of 1,695,900. A diverse and multicultural city, Auckland is home to the largest Polynesian population in the world. The Māori-language name for Auckland is Tāmaki or Tāmaki-makau-rau, meaning "Tāmaki with a hundred lovers", in reference to the desirability of its fertile land at the hub of waterways in all directions.

A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title. Member of Congress is an equivalent term in other jurisdictions.

Contents

Population centres

The Representation Act 1900 had increased the membership of the House of Representatives from general electorates 70 to 76, and this was implemented through the 1902 electoral redistribution. In 1902, changes to the country quota affected the three-member electorates in the four main centres. The tolerance between electorates was increased to ±1,250 so that the Representation Commissions (since 1896, there had been separate commissions for the North and South Islands) could take greater account of communities of interest. These changes proved very disruptive to existing boundaries, and six electorates were established for the first time, including Grey Lynn, and two electorates that previously existed were re-established. [1]

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

The country quota was a part of the New Zealand electoral system from 1881 until 1945. Its effect was to make urban constituencies more populous than those in rural areas, thus making rural votes worth more in general elections.

Electoral Commission (New Zealand) Crown entity administering elections in New Zealand

The Electoral Commission is an independent Crown entity set up by the New Zealand Parliament. It is responsible for the administration of parliamentary elections and referenda, promoting compliance with electoral laws, servicing the work of the Representation Commission, and the provision of advice, reports and public education on electoral matters. The Commission also assists electoral agencies of other countries on a reciprocal basis with their electoral events.

During this electorate's existence, it was centred on the suburb of Grey Lynn. In the 1902 election, the electorate was classed as a mix of rural and urban (with a two to one ratio), and comprised areas just west of the central part of Auckland. [2] In the 1907 electoral redistribution, the electorate was classed as fully urban, and the country quota thus no longer applied. [3]

Grey Lynn Suburb in Auckland Council, New Zealand

Grey Lynn is an inner residential suburb of Auckland City, New Zealand, located 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) to the west of the city centre. Originally a separate borough, Grey Lynn amalgamated with Auckland City in 1914.

1902 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1902 was held on Tuesday, 25 November, in the general electorates, and on Monday, 22 December in the Māori electorates to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 15th session of the New Zealand Parliament. A total number of 415,789 (76.7%) voters turned out to vote.

History

The electorate existed from 1902 to 1978. [4] George Fowlds of the Liberal Party was the electorate's first representative. [5] He served for three terms as was beaten in the 1911 election by the independent left-wing politician John Payne. [6] [7]

George Fowlds New Zealand politician

Sir George Matthew Fowlds was a New Zealand politician of the Liberal Party.

The New Zealand Liberal Party was the first organised political party in New Zealand. It governed from 1891 until 1912. The Liberal strategy was to create a large class of small land-owning farmers who supported Liberal ideals, by buying large tracts of Māori land and selling it to small farmers on credit. The Liberal Government also established the basis of the later welfare state, with old age pensions, developed a system for settling industrial disputes, which was accepted by both employers and trade unions. In 1893 it extended voting rights to women, making New Zealand the first country in the world to enact universal female suffrage.

1911 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1911 was held on Thursday, 7 and 14 December in the general electorates, and on Tuesday, 19 December in the Māori electorates to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 18th session of the New Zealand Parliament. A total number of 590,042 (83.5%) voters turned out to vote. In two seats there was only one candidate.

In 1919 Ellen Melville was one of three women who stood at short notice when women were able to stand as candidates for election to parliament. She stood on behalf of the Reform Party and came second in Grey Lynn.

Ellen Melville New Zealand politician

Eliza Ellen Melville was a New Zealand feminist and politician.

The Reform Party, formally the New Zealand Political Reform League, was New Zealand's second major political party, having been founded as a conservative response to the original Liberal Party. It was in government between 1912 and 1928, and later formed a coalition with the United Party, and then merged with United to form the modern National Party.

Grey Lynn was held from the 1919 election by Labour's Fred Bartram until he was defeated in 1928 by John Fletcher of the United Party. [8] During 1930, Fletcher became an Independent. [9] There was disagreement in the Labour Party regarding the nomination for the 1931 election, with John A. Lee chosen over their previous representative Fred Bartram, resulting in the latter to stand as an Independent. [10] [11] Four candidates stood in total, with Lee defeating the incumbent. [12]

1919 New Zealand general election Election in New Zealand

The New Zealand general election of 1919 was held on Tuesday, 16 December in the Māori electorates, and on Wednesday, 17 December in the general electorates to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 20th session of the New Zealand Parliament. A total number of 560,673 (80.5%) voters turned out to vote.

The New Zealand Labour Party, or simply Labour, is a centre-left political party in New Zealand. The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism, while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice. It is a participant of the international Progressive Alliance.

Fred Bartram New Zealand politician

Frederick Notley (Fred) Bartram was a New Zealand Member of Parliament for Grey Lynn in Auckland.

Members of Parliament

The electorate was represented by nine Members of Parliament. [4]

Key

  Liberal     Independent Labour     Labour     Independent     United     Democratic Labour   

ElectionWinner
1902 election George Fowlds
1905 election
1908 election
1911 election John Payne
1914 election
1919 election Fred Bartram
1922 election
1925 election
1928 election   John Fletcher [nb 1]
 
1931 election John A. Lee
1935 election
1938 election
1943 election Fred Hackett
1946 election
1949 election
1951 election
1954 election
1957 election
1960 election
1963 by-election Reginald Keeling
1963 election Ritchie Macdonald
1966 election
1969 election Eddie Isbey
1972 election
1975 election
(Electorate abolished 1978)

Table footnotes:

  1. John Fletcher became an Independent during 1930. [9]

Election results

1975 election

1975 general election: Grey Lynn [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Eddie Isbey 8,268 51.58 -9.03
National Jens Meder5,42933.87+6.90
Values Loren Robb1,4729.18
Social Credit William Alexander Ross9776.09-0.94
Socialist Action Matt Robson 310.19
Socialist Unity Bruce Skilton300.18
Majority2,83917.71-15.92
Turnout 16,02771.99-13.65
Registered electors 22,262

1972 election

1972 general election: Grey Lynn [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Eddie Isbey 9,887 60.61 +16.10
National Jens Meder4,40026.97+1.09
Social Credit William Alexander Ross1,1487.03+2.29
Values Wayne Houston8144.99
New Democratic Martin Spratt630.38
Majority5,48733.63+15.01
Turnout 16,31285.64-1.45
Registered electors 19,045

1969 election

1969 general election: Grey Lynn [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Eddie Isbey 6,966 44.51
National Jens Meder4,05125.88
Independent Labour Kevin Ryan3,88724.84
Social Credit William Alexander Ross7434.74-6.19
Majority2,91518.62
Turnout 15,64787.09+4.25
Registered electors 17,965

1966 election

1966 general election: Grey Lynn [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Ritchie Macdonald 8,329 59.77 -2.24
National Horace Alexander Nash3,93028.20
Social Credit William Alexander Ross1,52310.93+5.09
Communist Peter McAra1521.09
Majority4,39931.57-3.06
Turnout 13,93482.84-2.46
Registered electors 16,820

1963 election

1963 general election: Grey Lynn [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Ritchie Macdonald 9,383 62.01
National Jolyon Firth4,59830.38
Social Credit William Alexander Ross8855.84+1.96
Communist George Jackson2641.74-0.28
Majority5,24034.63
Turnout 15,13085.30+43.82
Registered electors 17,737

1963 by-election

1963 Grey Lynn by-election [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Reginald Keeling 4,172 65.84
National Raymond John Presland1,79128.26
Social Credit William Alexander Ross2463.88
Communist George Jackson1282.02
Informal votes240.38
Majority2,38137.57
Turnout 6,36141.48-44.66
Registered electors 15,336
Labour hold Swing

1960 election

1960 general election: Grey Lynn [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Hackett 8,761 63.78 -3.37
National Brian Zouch4,16530.32
Social Credit Frederick Thomas Morley6935.04
Communist Richard Charles Wolf1170.85
Majority4,59633.45-5.83
Turnout 13,73686.14-7.57
Registered electors 15,945

1957 election

1957 general election: Grey Lynn [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Hackett 9,893 67.15 +2.51
National Bernard Griffiths4,10627.87
Social Credit Ernest Richard James7334.97
Majority5,78739.28+2.65
Turnout 14,73293.71+2.79
Registered electors 15,720

1954 election

1954 general election: Grey Lynn [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Hackett 8,483 64.64 -0.35
National Thomas McGowan3,67628.01
Social Credit Samuel Hank Charles Jones8356.36
Communist Rita Smith 1290.98
Majority4,80736.63+6.65
Turnout 13,12390.92+2.25
Registered electors 14,432

1951 election

1951 general election: Grey Lynn [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Hackett 8,265 64.99 +6.95
National Harold Barry4,45235.01
Majority3,81329.98-11.98
Turnout 12,71788.67-5.23
Registered electors 14,341

1949 election

1949 general election: Grey Lynn [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Hackett 7,362 58.04 -14.40
National John Leon Faulkner3,15924.02
Democratic Labour John A. Lee 2,62719.98
Majority4,20341.96-2.93
Turnout 13,14893.90-0.98
Registered electors 14,002

1946 election

1946 general election: Grey Lynn [16]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Hackett 9,537 72.44 +13.43
National Harold Barry3,62727.56
Majority5,91044.89+9.17
Turnout 13,16494.28-0.07
Registered electors 13,962

1943 election

1943 general election: Grey Lynn [17] [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Hackett 10,010 59.01
Democratic Labour John A. Lee 3,95123.29-56.26
National Ellen Melville [19] 2,80216.52
Real Democracy Joseph Alexander Govan4102.42-18.03
People's Movement George Edward Plane910.54
Informal votes3221.86+0.03
Majority6,05935.72-23.38
Turnout 17,28694.35+1.67
Registered electors 18,321

1938 election

1938 general election: Grey Lynn [20] [21]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour John A. Lee 11,584 79.55 +4.78
National Joseph Alexander Govan2,97720.45
Informal votes2721.83-1.05
Majority8,60759.10-1.85
Turnout 14,83392.68+3.52
Registered electors 16,005

1935 election

1935 general election: Grey Lynn [22]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour John A. Lee 9,828 74.77 +16.99
United George Wildish 1,81613.81
Democrat Hilton Basil Moore Arthur1,2909.81
Communist Henry Mornington Smith2101.59
Informal votes3792.88+2.00
Majority8,01260.95+33.27
Turnout 13,14489.16+5.90
Registered electors 14,741

1931 election

1931 general election: Grey Lynn [12] [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour John A. Lee 6,767 57.78
Independent John Fletcher 3,52530.10-16.43
United Walter Harry Murray1,0378.85
Independent Labour Fred Bartram 3823.26-42.73
Informal votes1040.88-0.18
Majority3,24227.68
Turnout 11,81583.26-4.07
Registered electors 14,190

1928 election

1928 general election: Grey Lynn [24]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
United John Fletcher 5,489 46.53
Labour Fred Bartram 5,42545.99-6.67
Reform Patrick Buckley Fitzherbert6845.79
Independent Louisa Paterson720.61
Informal votes1261.06-0.26
Majority640.54
Turnout 11,79687.33-3.47
Registered electors 13,507

1925 election

1925 general election: Grey Lynn [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Bartram 6,061 52.66 -3.73
Reform Ellen Melville 5,29646.01
Informal votes1521.32+0.07
Majority7656.64-7.40
Turnout 11,50990.80-1.75
Registered electors 12,674

1922 election

1922 general election: Grey Lynn [26] [27] [28]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Bartram 5,648 56.39 +20.37
Reform William John Holdsworth4,24142.34
Informal votes1261.25-0.10
Majority1,40714.04+8.53
Turnout 10,01592.55+6.49
Registered electors 10,821

1919 election

1919 general election: Grey Lynn [29]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Bartram 3,141 36.02
Reform Ellen Melville 2,66030.51
Liberal George Fowlds 2,40527.58
Independent Lindsay Garmson2142.45
Independent Labour Paul Richardson1802.06
Informal votes1181.35-0.33
Majority4815.51
Turnout 8,71886.06-0.14
Registered electors 10,130

1914 election

1914 general election: Grey Lynn [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Labour John Payne 2,933 34.04 -16.07
Reform Murdoch McLean2,84433.01
United Labour George Fowlds 2,83832.94-16.62
Informal votes1451.68+1.37
Majority891.03+0.49
Turnout 8,61586.20+5.09
Registered electors 9,994

1911 election

1911 general election: Grey Lynn, first ballot [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal George Fowlds 3,11744.64-9.94
Independent Labour John Payne 2,19131.38
Reform Walter Harry Murray1,56822.45
Informal votes1061.51-0.57
Turnout 6,98281.79-0.41
Second ballot result
Independent Labour John Payne 3,470 50.11 +18.73
Liberal George Fowlds 3,43249.56+4.92
Informal votes220.31-1.20
Majority380.54
Turnout 6,92481.11-0.68
Registered electors 8,536

1908 election

1908 general election: Grey Lynn, first ballot [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal George Fowlds 4,035 54.58 +3.00
Conservative Oliver Nicholson3,14642.55
Independent Labour James Ulysses Brown570.77
Informal votes1542.08+1.16
Majority88912.02+7.92
Turnout 7,39282.20+0.87
Registered electors 8,992

1905 election

1905 general election: Grey Lynn [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal George Fowlds 2,891 51.58 -0.15
Conservative John Farrell2,66147.48
Informal votes520.92+1.95
Majority2304.10+1.23
Turnout 5,60481.33+5.71
Registered electors 6,890

1902 election

1902 general election: Grey Lynn [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal George Fowlds 2,108 51.43
Liberal–Labour Thomas Taylor Masefield1,99048.56
Majority1182.87
Turnout 4,09875.62
Registered electors 5,419

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 67f.
  2. McRobie 1989, pp. 66f.
  3. McRobie 1989, p. 71.
  4. 1 2 Wilson 1985, p. 264.
  5. Wilson 1985, p. 197.
  6. Wilson 1985, p. 197, 226.
  7. Gustafson 1980, p. 164.
  8. Wilson 1985, pp. 182, 197.
  9. 1 2 "State of Parties". Auckland Star . LXII (5). 7 January 1931. p. 3. Retrieved 31 October 2014.
  10. "General Election". Auckland Star . LXII (159). 8 July 1931. p. 5. Retrieved 31 October 2014.
  11. "Labour's Choice". The New Zealand Herald . LXVIII (20774). 17 January 1931. p. 12. Retrieved 31 October 2014.
  12. 1 2 The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 2. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  13. 1 2 Norton 1988, p. 232.
  14. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Norton 1988, p. 231.
  15. "The General Election, 1949". National Library. 1950. pp. 1–5, 8. Retrieved 3 January 2014.
  16. "The General Election, 1946". National Library. 1947. pp. 1–11, 14. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  17. "The General Election, 1943". National Library. 1943. p. 9. Retrieved 25 September 2017.
  18. "Grey Lynn". Evening Post . CXXXVI (76). 27 October 1938. p. 6. Retrieved 25 September 2017.
  19. Coney, Sandra. "Melville, Eliza Ellen". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 25 September 2017.
  20. "The General Election, 1938". National Library. 1938. p. 9. Retrieved 25 September 2017.
  21. "Parliamentary Election". Auckland Star . LXIX (254). 27 October 1938. p. 4. Retrieved 25 September 2017.
  22. The General Election, 1935. National Library. 1936. pp. 1–35. Retrieved 3 August 2013.
  23. "Election Counts". Auckland Star . LXII (291). 9 December 1931. p. 9. Retrieved 28 October 2014.
  24. The General Election, 1928. Government Printer. 1929. p. 3. Retrieved 19 November 2014.
  25. The General Election, 1925. Government Printer. 1926. p. 2. Retrieved 20 November 2014.
  26. The New Zealand Official Year-Book. Government Printer. 1924. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  27. McRobie 1989, pp. 83f.
  28. Hislop 1923, pp. 1–6.
  29. Hislop, J. (1921). The General Election, 1919. National Library. pp. 1–6. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
  30. Hislop, J. (1915). The General Election, 1914. National Library. pp. 1–33. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  31. "The General Election, 1911". National Library. 1912. pp. 1–14. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  32. "The General Election, 1908". National Library. 1909. pp. 1–34. Retrieved 14 April 2012.
  33. The General Election, 1905. p. 3. Retrieved 26 November 2015.
  34. The General Election, 1902. National Library. 1903. p. 1. Retrieved 4 December 2014.

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