Kaipara (New Zealand electorate)

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Kaipara is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate north of Auckland that existed from 1902 to 1946, and from 1978 to 1996.

Contents

Population centres

The Representation Act 1900 had increased the membership of the House of Representatives from general electorates 70 to 76, and this was implemented through the 1902 electoral redistribution. In 1902, changes to the country quota affected the three-member electorates in the four main centres. The tolerance between electorates was increased to ±1,250 so that the Representation Commissions (since 1896, there had been separate commissions for the North and South Islands) could take greater account of communities of interest. These changes proved very disruptive to existing boundaries, and six electorates were established for the first time, including Kaipara, and two electorates that previously existed were re-established. [1]

The electorate was rural and located north of Auckland city, in the North Auckland region.

History

The electorate was created for the 1902 election, and abolished in 1946. [2] The first representative was the independent conservative Alfred Harding. [3] In the 1905 election, Harding stood for the breakaway New Liberal Party, but was beaten by John Stallworthy of the Liberal Party. [4]

In the 1911 election, Stallworthy was beaten by Gordon Coates, who was Prime Minister from 1925 to 1928, and who held the electorate until he died in May 1943. [5] As a (belated) wartime general election was to be held shortly, a by-election was postponed through the By-elections Postponement Act 1943, [6] and Clifton Webb succeeded Coates at the general election in September 1943. [7] When the Kaipara electorate was abolished in 1946, Webb successfully stood in the Rodney electorate. [8]

Kaipara was recreated in 1978, [2] and again replaced by Rodney in 1996. Lockwood Smith then transferred to Rodney, and later became the Speaker of the House.

Members of Parliament

Key

  Independent     Liberal     Reform   
  National     Ind. National
ElectionWinner
1902 election Alfred Harding
1905 election John Stallworthy
1908 election
1911 election Gordon Coates
1914 election
1919 election
1922 election
1925 election
1928 election
1931 election
1935 election
1938 election
1943 election Clifton Webb
(electorate abolished 1946–1978, see Rodney)
1978 election Peter Wilkinson
1981 election
1984 election Lockwood Smith
1987 election
1990 election
1993 election
(electorate abolished 1996, see Rodney)

Election results

1943 election

1943 general election: Kaipara [9] [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent National Clifton Webb 4,95056.77
Labour John Stewart 2,17124.90
Independent Percy MacGregor Stewart1,59718.31-21.33
Informal votes450.51-0.18
Majority2,77931.87
Turnout 8,718

1938 election

1938 general election: Kaipara [11] [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Gordon Coates 5,414 57.62 +8.78
Labour Percy MacGregor Stewart3,72539.64
Country Party James Scott-Davidson2572.74
Informal votes650.69-0.74
Majority1,68917.98+14.87
Turnout 9,46192.85+3.17
Registered electors 10,190

1935 election

1935 general election: Kaipara [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Reform Gordon Coates 4,738 48.84 -14.30
Independent William Grounds4,43645.72
Democrat John Caughley5285.44
Informal votes1411.45+1.06
Majority3023.11-23.16
Turnout 9,70289.68+5.21
Registered electors 10,818

1931 election

1931 general election: Kaipara [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Reform Gordon Coates 5,008 63.14 -2.52
Country Party Albert Edward Robinson [15] 2,92436.86
Majority2,08426.27-5.04
Informal votes230.29-1.10
Turnout 7,95584.47-3.38
Registered electors 9,418

1928 election

1928 general election: Kaipara [16]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Reform Gordon Coates 5,190 65.65 -14.22
Labour Jim Barclay 2,71534.35
Informal votes1111.38-0.10
Majority2,47531.31-29.92
Turnout 8,01687.85-1.07
Registered electors 9,125

1925 election

1925 general election: Kaipara [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Reform Gordon Coates 6,307 79.87 +14.42
Labour Bill Barnard 1,47218.64
Informal votes1171.48+0.15
Majority4,83561.23+28.98
Turnout 7,89689.82+0.04
Registered electors 8,790

1922 election

1922 general election: Kaipara [18] [19] [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Reform Gordon Coates 5,001 65.45 -13.53
Liberal Robert Hornblow 2,53733.20
Informal votes1021.33-2.38
Majority2,46432.25-29.43
Turnout 7,64088.88+11.24
Registered electors 8,595

1919 election

1919 general election: Kaipara [21]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Reform Gordon Coates 4,214 78.98 +19.77
Labour Alfred Gregory92317.30
Informal votes1983.71+2.20
Majority3,29161.68+43.28
Turnout 5,33577.64-8.19
Registered electors 6,871

1914 election

1914 general election: Kaipara [22]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Reform Gordon Coates 3,596 59.21 +3.52
Liberal Richard Hoe2,47840.79
Informal votes921.511.29
Majority1,11818.40+6.80
Turnout 6,07485.83+7.63
Registered electors 7,076

1911 election

1911 general election: Kaipara, Second ballot [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Gordon Coates 2,744 55.69 +19.32
Liberal John Stallworthy 2,17244.08-1.33
Informal votes110.22-1.26
Majority57211.60
Turnout 4,92778.20-2.22
1911 general election: Kaipara, First ballot [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Stallworthy 2,301 45.41
Independent Gordon Coates 1,843 36.37
Reform Edward Thurlow Field84816.73
Informal votes751.48
Turnout 5,06780.42
Registered electors 6,300

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 67f.
  2. 1 2 Wilson 1985, p. 265.
  3. Wilson 1985, p. 202.
  4. Wilson 1985, pp. 202, 236.
  5. Wilson 1985, p. 189.
  6. "By-elections Postponement Act 1943 (7 GEO VI 1943 No 7)". Parliamentary Counsel Office . Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  7. Wilson 1985, p. 244.
  8. Wilson 1985, pp. 244, 265.
  9. "The General Election, 1943". National Library. 1944. Retrieved 28 March 2014.
  10. "Electoral". The New Zealand Herald . Vol. 80, no. 24713. 13 October 1943. p. 5. Retrieved 15 May 2017.
  11. "The General Election, 1938". National Library. 1939. p. 3. Retrieved 30 November 2014.
  12. "Electoral". The New Zealand Herald . Vol. LXXV, no. 23181. 29 October 1938. p. 25. Retrieved 30 November 2014.
  13. The New Zealand Official Year-Book. Government Printer. 1936. Archived from the original on 1 May 2012. Retrieved 3 August 2013.
  14. The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 3. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  15. "Notice of Nominations received and Polling Places appointed". Rodney and Otamatea Times, Waitemata and Kaipara Gazette. 25 November 1931. p. 7. Retrieved 21 November 2014.
  16. The General Election, 1928. Government Printer. 1929. p. 3. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  17. The General Election, 1925. Government Printer. 1926. p. 2. Retrieved 20 November 2014.
  18. The New Zealand Official Year-Book. Government Printer. 1924. Archived from the original on 21 January 2015. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  19. McRobie 1989, pp. 83f.
  20. Hislop 1923, pp. 1–6.
  21. Hislop, J. (1921). The General Election, 1919. National Library. pp. 1–6. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
  22. Hislop, J. (1915). The General Election, 1914. National Library. pp. 1–33. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  23. 1 2 "The General Election, 1911". National Library. 1912. pp. 1–14. Retrieved 1 August 2013.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Electoral history of Gordon Coates</span>

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References