Albany (New Zealand electorate)

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Albany was a New Zealand electorate. It was located in north Auckland, and named after the suburb of Albany. It existed from 1978 to 1984, and then was reinstated in 1987 before its final abolition in 2002.

Contents

Population centres

The 1977 electoral redistribution was the most overtly political since the Representation Commission had been established through an amendment to the Representation Act in 1886, initiated by Muldoon's National Government. [1] As part of the 1976 census, a large number of people failed to fill out an electoral re-registration card, and census staff had not been given the authority to insist on the card being completed. This had little practical effect for people on the general roll, but it transferred Māori to the general roll if the card was not handed in. Together with a northward shift of New Zealand's population, this resulted in five new electorates having to be created in the upper part of the North Island. [2] The electoral redistribution was very disruptive, and 22 electorates were abolished, while 27 electorates were newly created (including Albany) or re-established. These changes came into effect for the 1978 election. [3]

The Albany electorate was centred on Albany, which had previously been part of Waitemata electorate. [4] Its territory extended southwards to include Greenhithe and Paremoremo (also formerly part of Waitemata), plus a large portion of Glenfield (formerly split between Waitemata and East Coast Bays). It extended northwards to include Okura, Orewa, and Stanmore Bay (which were formerly part of Rodney electorate). [4] For the 1984 election, however, the electorate was abolished. Glenfield and Greenhithe were split off to form the Glenfield electorate, and most of the remainder (including Albany itself) was absorbed into Rodney electorate. [5]

The 1987 electoral redistribution took the continued population growth in the North Island into account, and two additional general electorates were created, bringing the total number of electorates to 97. In the South Island, the shift of population to Christchurch had continued. [6] Overall, three electorates were newly created, three electorates were recreated (including Albany), and four electorates were abolished. All of those electorates were in the North Island. Changes in the South Island were restricted to boundary changes. [7] These changes came into effect with the 1987 election. [8] The Albany electorate was based around the portion of the former Albany which had been merged into Rodney, plus Greenhithe (which had become part of Glenfield). Glenfield itself remained its own electorate. The new Albany also included Hobsonville and Whenuapai, taken from West Auckland, and stretched as far north as Orewa. [9] For the 1990 election, the electorate expanded to the west slightly, towards Kumeu, but this was effectively reversed at the 1993 election. When the transition to MMP prompted a major redistribution at the 1996 election, most of the Glenfield seat was merged into Albany, almost bringing the seat back to its original shape in 1978. It lost some ground to the west at the 1999 election. For the 2002 election, the seat was abolished once again its western territories, including Greenhithe and Albany itself, became part of the new Helensville electorate, while the remainder was established as the new East Coast Bays electorate.

History

Don McKinnon of the National Party was the first representative of the electorate. He served for two terms from 1978, and successfully contested Rodney in 1984 election. [10]

Members of Parliament

Key

  National   

ElectionWinner
1978 election Don McKinnon
1981 election
(Electorate abolished 1984–1987; see Glenfield and Rodney)
1987 election Don McKinnon
1990 election
1993 election
1996 election Murray McCully
1999 election
(Electorate abolished in 2002; see Helensville and East Coast Bays)

Election results

1999 election

1999 general election: Albany [11] [12]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Murray McCully 13,70140.18-9.4813,58339.41
Labour Hamish McCracken8,75325.67+15.1010,27129.80
Alliance Heather McConachy3,77511.07-1.941,9675.71
ACT Mike Steeneveld2,4147.08+1.964,23212.28
Green Bera MacClement1,5854.651,5294.44
Independent Callum Blair1,5484.54
Christian Democrats Rob Wheeler8692.555561.61
NZ First Joy Brett7512.20-14.671,0332.97
Christian Heritage Tony Corbett6651.955751.67
NMP Darag Rennie410.12190.06
Legalise Cannabis  2430.71
United NZ  2330.68
Libertarianz  690.20
Animals First  530.15
McGillicuddy Serious  450.13
Natural Law  190.06
One NZ  180.05
Freedom Movement50.01
Mana Māori Movement  50.01
People's Choice Party 30.01
Republican  30.01
South Island  30.01
Mauri Pacific  10.00
Informal votes512149
Total Valid votes34,10234,465
National holdMajority4,94814.51-18.28

1996 election

1996 general election: Albany [13] [14] [15]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Murray McCully 17,63949.67+11.9215,81244.31
NZ First Terry Heffernan 5,99216.873,5369.91
Alliance Heather McConachy4,62113.012,2886.41
Labour Colin Hutchinson3,75310.577,22120.24
ACT Marilyn Thomas1,8205.123,91010.96
Christian Coalition Judith Phillips9422.651,6034.49
Progressive Green Miles Allen3891.101210.34
McGillicuddy Serious Tina Nevin2830.80880.25
Natural Law Tom Hopwood820.23500.14
Legalise Cannabis  5071.42
United NZ  3030.85
Ethnic Minority Party 690.19
Animals First  610.17
Advance New Zealand 550.15
Superannuitants & Youth 180.05
Green Society 160.04
Libertarianz  150.04
Conservatives 70.02
Asia Pacific United 40.01
Mana Māori Movement  10.00
Te Tawharau 00.00
Informal votes23874
Total Valid votes35,52135,685
National holdMajority11,64732.79

1993 election

1993 general election: Albany [16]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Don McKinnon 8,166 37.75 -15.47
Alliance Jill Jeffs4,51520.87
NZ First Toni McRae4,30019.88
Labour June Allen3,84817.79-4.25
Christian Heritage Dirk Hoek4131.91
Independent Sue Power2060.95
McGillicuddy Serious Pam Chiles1840.85+0.43
Majority3,65116.88-14.29
Informal votes6172.77
Turnout 22,24987.26
Registered electors 25,497

1990 election

1990 general election: Albany [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Don McKinnon 12,726 53.22 +2.14
Labour June Allen5,27122.04
Green Ray Galvin4,18917.51
NewLabour Bob Van Ruyssevelt8843.69
Democrats Alan McCulloch 3951.65
Social Credit Alfred Jamieson1850.77
Independent Glenn Corbin1600.66
McGillicuddy Serious Pam Chiles1010.42
Majority7,45531.17+23.33
Turnout 23,911

1987 election

1987 general election: Albany [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Don McKinnon 10,799 51.08
Labour Chris Carter 9,14143.23
Democrats George Thew8964.23
Independent B R H Smith1540.72
NZ Party R E Cummings1510.71
Majority1,6587.84
Turnout 21,14187.79
Registered electors 24,081

1981 election

1981 general election: Albany [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Don McKinnon 9,966 40.60 -0.38
Labour Bryan Mockridge8,00232.60
Social Credit George Thew6,57326.78+7.28
Majority1,9648.00+2.48
Turnout 24,54189.99+18.02
Registered electors 27,268

1978 election

1978 general election: Albany [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Don McKinnon 8,597 40.98
Labour David Rankin7,43835.45
Social Credit George Thew4,09119.50
Values A M R Dean5432.58
Independent National C P Belton3071.46
Majority1,1595.52
Turnout 20,97671.92
Registered electors 29,165

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 8–9, 51, 119.
  2. McRobie 1989, p. 119.
  3. McRobie 1989, pp. 115–120.
  4. 1 2 McRobie 1989, pp. 115, 119.
  5. McRobie 1989, pp. 119, 123.
  6. McRobie 1989, pp. 127f.
  7. McRobie 1989, pp. 123–128.
  8. McRobie 1989, p. 127.
  9. McRobie 1989, pp. 123, 127.
  10. Wilson 1985, p. 216.
  11. "Official Count Results (1999) – Electoral Votes for registered parties by electorate". NZ Electoral Commission. Archived from the original on 14 January 2015. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  12. "Official Count Results (1999) – Candidate Vote Details". NZ Electoral Commission. Archived from the original on 14 January 2015. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  13. "Electorate Candidate and Party Votes Recorded at Each Polling Place - Albany" (PDF). Retrieved 24 December 2011.[ permanent dead link ]
  14. "Part III - Party Lists of Successful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 14 June 2013.
  15. "Part III - Party Lists of unsuccessful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 14 June 2013.
  16. Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1993. pp. 5, 161.
  17. Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1990.
  18. 1 2 3 Norton 1988, p. 189.

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