Waitemata (New Zealand electorate)

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Waitemata was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, from 1871 to 1946, and then from 1954 to 1978. It was represented by 18 members of parliament.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title. Member of Congress is an equivalent term in other jurisdictions.

Contents

Population centres

The Waitemata electorate was created in the 1870 electoral redistribution based on 1867 New Zealand census data and was used in its initial form for the 1871 election. [1] It was located north of the various urban Auckland electorates and south of the Rodney electorate. [2] The following settlements were included in its initial area: Cornwallis, Huia, Parau, Laingholm, Titirangi, Waiatarua, Oratia, Piha, Henderson Valley, Swanson, Ranui, Waitakere, Taupaki, Kumeu, Hobsonville, Whenuapai, Takapuna, and Helensville. [2]

1871 New Zealand general election New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1871 was held between 14 January and 23 February to elect 78 MPs across 72 electorates to the fifth session of the New Zealand Parliament. 41,527 electors were registered.

Auckland Metropolitan area in North Island, New Zealand

Auckland is a city in the North Island of New Zealand. The most populous urban area in the country, Auckland has an urban population of around 1,628,900. It is located in the Auckland Region—the area governed by Auckland Council—which includes outlying rural areas and the islands of the Hauraki Gulf, resulting in a total population of 1,695,900. Auckland is a diverse, multicultural and cosmopolitan city, home to the largest Polynesian population in the world. A Māori-language name for Auckland is Tāmaki or Tāmaki-makau-rau, meaning "Tāmaki with a hundred lovers", in reference to the desirability of its fertile land at the hub of waterways in all directions.

Rodney (New Zealand electorate) Current New Zealand electorate

Rodney is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the House of Representatives. The current MP for Rodney is Mark Mitchell of the National Party. He has held this position since 2011.

The First Labour Government was defeated in the 1949 election and the incoming National Government changed the Electoral Act, with the electoral quota once again based on total population as opposed to qualified electors, and the tolerance was increased to 7.5% of the electoral quota. There was no adjustments in the number of electorates between the South and North Islands, but the law changes resulted in boundary adjustments to almost every electorate through the 1952 electoral redistribution; only five electorates were unaltered. [3] Five electorates were reconstituted (including Waitemata) and one was newly created, and a corresponding six electorates were abolished; all of these in the North Island. [4] These changes took effect with the 1954 election. [5]

First Labour Government of New Zealand

The First Labour Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1935 to 1949. Responsible for the realisation of a wide range of progressive social reforms during its time in office, it set the tone of New Zealand's economic and welfare policies until the 1980s, establishing a welfare state, a system of Keynesian economic management, and high levels of state intervention. The government came to power towards the end of, and as a result of, the Great Depression of the 1930s, and also governed the country throughout World War II.

1949 New Zealand general election

The 1949 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 29th term. It saw the governing Labour Party defeated by the opposition National Party. This marked the end of the First Labour government and the beginning of the First National government.

The First National Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1949 to 1957. It was a conservative government best remembered for its role in the 1951 waterfront dispute. It also began the repositioning of New Zealand in the cold war environment. Although New Zealand continued to assist Britain in situations such as the Malayan Emergency, it now became connected to Australia and the United States through the ANZUS agreement.

History

The electorate existed from 1871 to 1946, and from 1954 to 1978. [6]

1954 New Zealand general election

The 1954 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 31st term. It saw the governing National Party remain in office, but with a slightly reduced majority. It also saw the debut of the new Social Credit Party, which won more than eleven percent of the vote but failed to win a seat.

Early members were Thomas Henderson 1871–1874 (resigned), [7] Gustav von der Heyde 1874–1875 (unseated on petition), [8] John Sangster Macfarlane 1876–1879 (defeated), [9] Reader Wood 1879–1881 (retired), [10] William John Hurst 1881–1886 (died), [11] Richard Monk 1886–1890 (defeated), [12] and Jackson Palmer 1890–1893 (defeated). [13]

Thomas Henderson (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

Thomas Maxwell Henderson was a New Zealand politician. He was one of the earliest settlers in Auckland. He was a significant entrepreneur, and the Auckland suburb of Henderson bears his name.

Gustav Ludwig Theodor von der Heyde (1836–1891) was a 19th-century Member of Parliament in Auckland, New Zealand.

John Sangster Macfarlane (1818–1880) was a 19th-century Member of Parliament in Auckland, New Zealand.

The election of Richard Monk, who stood again in 1893, was declared invalid. [12] From 1894 to 1896 Waitemata was held by future Prime Minister William Massey, until he transferred to Franklin. [14] Richard Monk held the electorate for the period 1896–1902. [12] The seat was then held by Ewen Alison from 1902 to 1908, [15] Leonard Phillips from 1908 to 1911, [16] and Alexander Harris from 1911 to 1935. [17]

1893 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1893 was held on 28 November and 20 December in the European and Māori electorates, respectively, to elect 74 MPs to the 12th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The election was won by the Liberal Party, and Richard Seddon became Prime Minister.

The 1894 Waitemata by-election was a by-election held on 9 April 1894 during the 12th New Zealand Parliament in the rural North Island seat of the Waitemata.

William Massey Prime Minister of New Zealand

William Ferguson Massey, commonly known as Bill Massey, was a politician who served as the 19th Prime Minister of New Zealand from May 1912 to May 1925. He was the founding leader of the Reform Party, New Zealand's second organised political party, from 1909 until his death.

In 1946 Henry Thorne Morton, who had held the seat from 1943, was defeated for North Shore. [18]

Members of Parliament

Waitemata was represented by 18 Members of Parliament. [6]

Key

  Independent     Independent Liberal     Conservative     Reform     Labour     National   

ElectionWinner
1871 election Thomas Henderson
1st 1874 by-election Gustav von der Heyde
2nd 1874 by-election
1876 election John Macfarlane
1879 election Reader Wood
1881 election William Hurst
1884 election
1886 by-election Richard Monk
1887 election
1890 election Jackson Palmer
1893 election Richard Monk
1894 by-election William Massey
1896 election Richard Monk
1899 election
1902 election Ewen Alison
1905 election
1908 election Leonard Phillips
1911 election Alexander Harris
1914 election
1919 election
1922 election
1925 election
1928 election
1931 election
1935 election Jack Lyon
1938 election
1941 by-election Mary Dreaver
1943 election Henry Morton
(electorate abolished 1946–1954, see North Shore)
1954 election Norman King
1957 election
1960 election
1963 election
1966 election
1969 election Frank Gill
1972 election Michael Bassett
1975 election Dail Jones
(electorate abolished 1978, see Helensville)

Election results

1975 election

1975 general election: Waitemata [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Dail Jones 8,965 46.94
Labour Michael Bassett 7,58036.69-17.21
Social Credit G L McCormick1,4607.64-0.38
Values Steve Covacich1,0465.47
Independent G E Bree440.23
Majority1,3857.25
Turnout 19,09577.75-10.91
Registered electors 24,557

1972 election

1972 general election: Waitemata [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Michael Bassett 8,083 53.90 +10.91
National Ray La Varis 5,53936.93
Social Credit G L McCormick1,2038.02
New Democratic J R Neil1060.70
Liberal ReformR J Hannaford650.43
Majority2,54416.96
Turnout 14,99688.66-1.72
Registered electors 16,913

1969 election

1969 general election: Waitemata [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Frank Gill 8,804 48.82
Labour Michael Bassett 7,75242.99
Social Credit Alexander Gilbert Davidson1,4758.18
Majority1,0525.83
Turnout 18,03190.38+4.08
Registered electors 19,950

1966 election

1966 general election: Waitemata [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Norman King 11,624 53.09 -2.03
National Terry Power7,79235.59
Social Credit Joseph F. Richards2,47611.31
Majority3,83217.50-0.89
Turnout 21,89286.30-2.24
Registered electors 25,365

1963 election

1963 general election: Waitemata [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Norman King 9,686 55.12 +5.30
National A G E Pugh6,76738.51
Social Credit Byrt Jordan9545.42-0.91
Communist B J Holmes1640.93
Majority2,91916.61-9.88
Turnout 17,57188.54-2.60
Registered electors 19,845

1960 election

1960 general election: Waitemata [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Norman King 9,241 49.82 -3.70
National Jolyon Firth7,99243.09
Social Credit Byrt Jordan1,1746.33+0.01
Communist Hugh John McLeod1390.74
Majority1,2496.73-6.64
Turnout 18,54691.14-3.69
Registered electors 20,348

1957 election

1957 general election: Waitemata [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Norman King 8,771 53.52 +6.99
National Robert Muldoon 6,58040.15
Social Credit Byrt Jordan1,0366.32-3.09
Majority2,19113.37+10.89
Turnout 16,38794.83+3.20
Registered electors 17,280

1954 election

1954 general election: Waitemata [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Norman King 7,234 46.53
National Hubert Morrison6,84744.04
Social Credit Byrt Jordan1,4639.41
Majority3872.48
Turnout 15,54491.63
Registered electors 16,963

1943 election

1943 general election: Waitemata [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Henry Morton 6,451 42.22
Labour Mary Dreaver 6,13040.12-4.52
Democratic Labour Karl Benjamin Ansley9766.38
Independent William C. Hewitt2041.33
Informal votes1270.83
Majority3212.10
Turnout 15,27794.62
Registered electors 16,144

1941 by-election

1941 Waitemata by-election [21] [22]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Mary Dreaver 4,092 44.64
Independent National William Brockway Darlow3,69040.26
Democratic Labour Norman Douglas 9099.91
Independent Peter Robertson Gardner4004.36
Independent Henry Thomas Head740.80
Majority4024.38
Turnout 9,165

1938 election

1938 general election: Waitemata [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Jack Lyon 7,806 57.95 +6.43
National John Ernest Close5,54541.16
Informal votes1180.87-0.84
Majority2,26116.78-4.24
Turnout 13,46994.19+2.31
Registered electors 14,299

1935 election

1935 general election: Waitemata [24] [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Jack Lyon 6,578 51.52
Independent Alexander Harris 3,89430.50-22.38
Democrat Alan Walter Donald2,04516.02
United John Guiniven2521.97
Majority2,68421.02-1.46
Informal votes2221.71+1.37
Turnout 12,99191.88+10.91
Registered electors 14,139

1931 election

1931 general election: Waitemata [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Alexander Harris 5,593 52.88 +12.28
Labour Arthur Osborne 3,21530.40+8.85
United William Brockway Darlow [27] 1,76916.72
Majority2,37822.48+19.75
Informal votes360.34-0.28
Turnout 10,61380.97-4.87
Registered electors 13,107

1928 election

1928 general election: Waitemata [28] [29]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Alexander Harris 4,683 40.59 -17.24
United Reginald Henry Greville4,36837.86
Labour Arthur Osborne 2,48521.54-7.16
Majority3152.73-26.40
Informal votes720.62+0.11
Turnout 11,60885.84-4.84
Registered electors 13,523

1925 election

1925 general election: Waitemata [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Reform Alexander Harris 7,101 57.84 +11.74
Labour Arthur Osborne 3,52428.70
Liberal Thomas Lamont1,65313.46
Majority3,57729.13+16.36
Informal votes630.51-0.30
Turnout 12,34190.68+1.00
Registered electors 13,610

1922 election

1922 general election: Waitemata [31] [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Reform Alexander Harris 4,586 46.10 -12.34
Liberal Frank Henry Burbush3,31533.32
Labour Robert Frederick Way [33] 2,04720.58
Majority1,27112.78-4.11
Informal votes810.81-0.59
Turnout 10,02989.67+6.21
Registered electors 11,184

1919 election

1919 general election: Waitemata [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Reform Alexander Harris 4,911 58.44 +2.65
Liberal Arthur Edwin Greenslade [35] 3,49241.56
Majority1,41916.89+5.31
Informal votes1191.40+0.32
Turnout 8,52283.46-1.22
Registered electors 10,211

1914 election

1914 general election: Waitemata [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Reform Alexander Harris 4,881 55.79 +2.98
Liberal Henry Cromwell Tewsley [37] 3,86844.21
Majority1,01311.58+5.96
Informal votes951.07+0.91
Turnout 8,84484.68+2.37
Registered electors 10,444

1911 election

1911 general election: Waitemata, first ballot [38]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal William Joseph Napier 3,064 42.40 +0.01
Reform Alexander Harris 2,787 38.57
Independent Ewen Alison 1,37519.03
Majority2773.83-11.34
Informal votes1421.93
Turnout 7,36883.64+6.66
Registered electors 8,809
1911 general election: Waitemata, second ballot [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Reform Alexander Harris 3,823 52.81 +14.24
Liberal William Joseph Napier 3,41647.194.79
Majority4075.62+1.79
Informal votes120.17-1.76
Turnout 7,25182.31-1.33
Registered electors 8,809

1908 election

1908 general election: Waitemata, first ballot [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Leonard Phillips 2,946 49.50
Liberal William Joseph Napier 2,059 34.59
Liberal Henry Wakeford Wilding67311.31
Independent Theophilus Wake2744.60
Majority88714.90-3.47
Turnout 5,95277.02-8.03
Registered electors 7,728
1908 general election: Waitemata, second ballot [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Leonard Phillips 3,426 57.56 +8.06
Liberal William Joseph Napier 2,52342.39+7.80
Majority90315.17+0.27
Turnout 5,94976.98-0.04
Registered electors 7,728

1905 election

1905 general election: Waitemata [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ewen Alison 3,128 59.19 +0.49
Liberal Cecil Clinkard 2,15740.81
Majority97118.37+0.98
Informal votes841.56
Turnout 5,36985.05+14.02
Registered electors 6,313

1902 election

1902 general election: Waitemata [43] [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ewen Alison 2,409 58.70
Liberal Alexander John Hatfield [45] 1,69541.30
Majority71417.40+3.92
Turnout 4,10471.03+2.53
Registered electors 5,778

1899 election

1899 general election: Waitemata [46] [47]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Richard Monk 1,713 51.29
Liberal Edwin Ford1,26337.81
Liberal Charles Newman36410.90
Majority45013.47
Turnout 3,34068.50
Registered electors 4,876

1894 by-election

1894 Waitemata by-election [48]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative William Massey 1,619 52.82
Independent Liberal Jackson Palmer 1,44647.17
Majority1735.64
Turnout 3,065

1890 election

1890 general election: Waitemata [49]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Liberal Jackson Palmer 752 53.22
Conservative Richard Monk 66146.77
Majority916.44
Turnout 1,41339.92
Registered electors 3,539

1886 Waitemata by-election

1886 Waitemata by-election [50] [51] [52]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Richard Monk 736 69.83
Independent Harry Farnall 31229.60
Majority42440.23
Informal votes6
Turnout 1054

September 1874 Waitemata by-election

September 1874 Waitemata by-election [53]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Gustav von der Heyde 271 56.46
Independent John Sangster Macfarlane 20943.53
Majority6212.92
Turnout 480

July 1874 Waitemata by-election

July 1874 Waitemata by-election [54]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Gustav von der Heyde 287 54.77
Independent John Sangster Macfarlane 23745.23
Majority509.54
Turnout 524

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, p. 39.
  2. 1 2 McRobie 1989, p. 38.
  3. McRobie 1989, pp. 99f.
  4. McRobie 1989, pp. 95–100.
  5. McRobie 1989, p. 99.
  6. 1 2 Wilson 1985, p. 275.
  7. Wilson 1985, p. 204.
  8. Wilson 1985, p. 242.
  9. Wilson 1985, p. 215.
  10. Wilson 1985, p. 247.
  11. Wilson 1985, p. 207.
  12. 1 2 3 Wilson 1985, p. 220.
  13. Wilson 1985, p. 225.
  14. Wilson 1985, p. 219.
  15. Wilson 1985, p. 179.
  16. Wilson 1985, p. 226.
  17. Wilson 1985, p. 203.
  18. Wilson 1985, p. 221.
  19. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Norton 1988, pp. 379.
  20. The General Election, 1943. National Library. 1944. p. 1000. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  21. "Waitemata Election". Dunstan Times. 21 July 1941. p. 5. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
  22. "Notice of Nominations Received and Polling Places Appointed". The New Zealand Herald . LXXVIII (24011). 8 July 1941. p. 12. Retrieved 24 April 2016.
  23. "The General Election, 1938". National Library. 1939. p. 5. Retrieved 28 March 2014.
  24. The New Zealand Official Year-Book. Government Printer. 1936. Retrieved 3 August 2013.
  25. "Election Results". The Evening Post . CXX (136). 5 December 1935. p. 5. Retrieved 12 November 2013.
  26. The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 4. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  27. "Parliamentary Elections". Auckland Star . LXII (275). 20 November 1931. p. 5. Retrieved 5 December 2014.
  28. The General Election, 1928. Government Printer. 1929. p. 5. Retrieved 29 November 2014.
  29. "Electoral". The New Zealand Herald . LXV (20090). 30 October 1928. p. 4. Retrieved 29 November 2014.
  30. The General Election, 1925. Government Printer. 1926. p. 3. Retrieved 20 November 2014.
  31. Hislop, J. (1923). The General Election, 1922. Government Printer. p. 1. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
  32. "Electoral". Auckland Star . LIII (296). 14 December 1922. p. 16. Retrieved 5 December 2014.
  33. Gustafson 1980, p. 169.
  34. Hislop, J. (1921). The General Election, 1919. National Library. p. 3. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
  35. "Waitemata Parliamentary Election". Observer. XL (14). 6 December 1919. p. 12. Retrieved 5 December 2014.
  36. Hislop, J. (1915). The General Election, 1914. National Library. p. 3. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
  37. "Mr. H.C. Tewsley". Observer. XXXV (14). 12 December 1914. p. 15. Retrieved 5 December 2014.
  38. AtoJs 1911 election 1912, p. 6.
  39. AtoJs 1911 election 1912, p. 1.
  40. AtoJs 1908 election 1909, pp. 2f.
  41. AtoJs 1908 election 1909, p. 28.
  42. The General Election, 1905. National Library. 1906. p. 1. Retrieved 4 December 2014.
  43. The General Election, 1902. National Library. 1903. p. 1. Retrieved 4 December 2014.
  44. "Waitemata". Observer. XXIII (10). 22 November 1902. p. 4. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  45. "Page 18 Advertisements Column 1". Observer. XXIII (10). 22 November 1902. p. 18. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  46. "The General Election, 1899". Wellington: Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives. 19 June 1900. p. 1. Retrieved 12 March 2014.
  47. "Waitemata Electoral District". The New Zealand Herald . XXXVI (11241). 9 December 1899. p. 8. Retrieved 10 March 2014.
  48. "Waitemata Election". Thames Advertiser. XXVI (7794). 13 April 1894. p. 2. Retrieved 7 April 2016.
  49. "The General Election, 1890". National Library. 1891. Retrieved 25 February 2012.
  50. "Untitled". The New Zealand Herald . 15 December 1886.
  51. "Waitemata Election". The New Zealand Herald . XXIII (7819). 13 December 1886. p. 5.
  52. "Waitemata Election". Auckland Star . 13 December 1886.
  53. "Waitemata Election". Daily Southern Cross . 24 September 1874.
  54. "Waitemata Election". Auckland Star. 29 July 1874.

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References