Dunedin South

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Dunedin South electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election Dunedin South electorate, 2014.svg
Dunedin South electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election

Dunedin South is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It first existed from 1881 to 1890, then from 1905 to 1946 and was re-established for the introduction of MMP in 1996. A Labour Party stronghold, it has been represented by Clare Curran since the 2008 election.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

Mixed-member proportional (MMP) representation is a mixed electoral system in which voters get two votes: one to decide the representative for their single-seat constituency, and one for a political party. Seats in the legislature are filled firstly by the successful constituency candidates, and secondly, by party candidates based on the percentage of nationwide or region-wide votes that each party received. The constituency representatives are elected using first-past-the-post voting (FPTP) or another plurality/majoritarian system. The nationwide or region-wide party representatives are, in most jurisdictions, drawn from published party lists, similar to party-list proportional representation. To gain a nationwide representative, parties may be required to achieve a minimum number of constituency candidates, a minimum percentage of the nationwide party vote, or both.

The New Zealand Labour Party, or simply Labour, is a centre-left political party in New Zealand. The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism, while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice. It is a participant of the international Progressive Alliance.

Contents

Population centres

The previous electoral redistribution was undertaken in 1875 for the 1875–76 election. In the six years since, New Zealand's European population had increased by 65%. In the 1881 electoral redistribution, the House of Representatives increased the number of European representatives to 91 (up from 84 since the 1875–76 election). The number of Māori electorates was held at four. The House further decided that electorates should not have more than one representative, which led to 35 new electorates being formed, including Dunedin South, and two electorates that had previously been abolished to be recreated. This necessitated a major disruption to existing boundaries. [1]

1875–76 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1875–76 was held between 20 December 1875 and 29 January 1876 to elect a total of 88 MPs in 73 electorates to the 6th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 4 and 15 January 1876. A total of 56,471 voters were registered.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

As the name suggests, the electorate is based on the southern suburbs of Dunedin. It stretches out westwards to take in towns on the Taieri Plains such as Mosgiel, Green Island and Fairfield. The Otago Peninsula is also in the electorate.

Dunedin City in Otago, New Zealand

Dunedin is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the Otago region. Its name comes from Dùn Èideann, the Scottish Gaelic name for Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland.

Mosgiel human settlement in New Zealand

Mosgiel is an urban satellite of Dunedin in Otago, New Zealand, fifteen kilometres west of the city's centre. Since the re-organisation of New Zealand local government in 1989 it has been inside the Dunedin City Council area, but was physically separate from the contiguous suburbs until developments in the neighbouring suburb of Fairfield joined it to the city. Mosgiel has a population of approximately 10,700. The town celebrates its location, calling itself "The pearl of the plain". Its low-lying nature does pose problems, making it prone to flooding after heavy rains. Mosgiel takes its name from Mossgiel Farm, Ayrshire, the farm of the poet Robert Burns, the uncle of the co-founder in 1848 of the Otago settlement, the Reverend Thomas Burns.

Green Island is a suburb of Dunedin, New Zealand. Not an actual island, this former borough takes its name from the Green Island bush, uncleared native forest extending from the valley where the community is centred over the hills towards the coast. The name of the nearby offshore island — Green Island (Okaihe) — was used to identify the bush and, thus, also lent its name to the mainland suburb.

The current Dunedin South electorate was created in 1996 as one of the original 65 MMP electorates, as a merger between St Kilda and a large part of Dunedin West. Until the 2008 election, it was enlarged at every electoral boundary review, but in the 2013 review, its boundaries were kept. [2] Middlemarch was first included in the electorate for the 2008 election; other localities include:

St Kilda is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It existed from 1946 to 1996 and was represented by four Members of Parliament.

Dunedin West was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, in the city of Dunedin. It existed for three periods between 1881 and 1996 and was represented by seven Members of Parliament.

Middlemarch, New Zealand human settlement in New Zealand

Middlemarch is a small town in the Otago region of New Zealand's South Island. It lies at the foot of the Rock and Pillar Range of hills in the broad Strath-Taieri valley, through which flows the middle reaches of the Taieri River. Since local government reorganisation in the late 1980s, Middlemarch and much of the Strath-Taieri has been administered as part of Dunedin city, the centre of which lies some 80 km to the southeast. Middlemarch has reticulated sewerage but no reticulated water supply.

Outram, New Zealand human settlement in New Zealand

Outram is a rural suburb of Dunedin, New Zealand, with a population of 642. It is located 28 kilometres west of the central city at the edge of the Taieri Plains, close to the foot of Maungatua. The Taieri River flows close to the southeast of the town. Outram lies on State Highway 87 between Mosgiel and Middlemarch.

History

The electorate was first established for the 1881 election and abolished after three parliamentary terms in 1890, when several Dunedin electorates were amalgamated to form the City of Dunedin electorate. [3] During the nine years of its first existence, the electorate was represented by two MPs, Henry Fish (1881–1884 and 1887–1890) [4] and James Gore (1884–1887). [5]

1881 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1881 was held on 8 and 9 December in the Māori and European electorates, respectively, to elect 95 MPs to the 8th session of the New Zealand Parliament.

Dunedin or the City of Dunedin or the Town of Dunedin was a parliamentary electorate in the city of Dunedin in Otago, New Zealand. It was one of the original electorates created in 1853 and existed, with two breaks, until 1905. It was the only New Zealand electorate that was created as a single-member, two-member and three member electorate.

Henry Fish New Zealand politician

Henry Smith Fish was a 19th-century New Zealand politician. For a time, he was a member of the Liberal Party. He was Mayor of Dunedin for a total of six years. Smith is remembered as one of the staunch opponents of Women's suffrage.

Dunedin South was re-established after the abolition of the City of Dunedin electorate for the 1905 election. [3] The first representative was James Frederick Arnold, who was an independent liberal and who served until the end of the parliamentary term in 1908, when he successfully contested Dunedin Central. [6]

Thomas Sidey of the Liberal Party who had since a St Kilda by election represented St Kilda won the 1908 election for Dunedin South. He represented the electorate for six parliamentary terms until 1928. [7] In 1919, Tom Paul nearly won the seat for Labour, losing by only 84 votes.

Sidey was succeeded by William Burgoyne Taverner of the United Party in the 1928 election. [8] At the next election in 1931, the electorate was won by Fred Jones of the Labour Party. Jones held the electorate until 1946, when it was abolished, and successfully stood in St Kilda that year. [9]

The electorate was re-established for the 1996 election and won by Michael Cullen, who later became Finance minister. Cullen had previously represented St Kilda (1981–1996). At the next election in 1999, Cullen stood as a list candidate only and was succeeded by David Benson-Pope as the electorate MP. After three parliamentary terms, Benson-Pope was not selected by the Labour Party as their candidate, but Clare Curran was chosen instead. Curran has represented the electorate since the 2008 election.

The city of Dunedin is a New Zealand Labour Party stronghold; The last National MP elected from a Dunedin constituency was Richard Walls in 1975. However, in 2011, National Party candidate, Jo Hayes, reduced the incumbent, Clare Curran's majority from 6449 in 2008 [10] to 4175, [11] and National gained a plurality of the party vote in Dunedin South by 1837 votes. [11] The winning of the party vote is unprecedented in Dunedin South, which was seen, pre 2011, as a Labour Party stronghold. However the predecessor seat of St Kilda was represented by Jim Barnes of the National Party between 1951 and 1957. [12] In the 2014 election, Curran was successful against National's Hamish Walker. [13]

Members of Parliament

Key  Independent     Liberal–Labour     Liberal     United     Labour   

ElectionWinner
1881 election Henry Fish
1884 election James Gore
1887 election Henry Smith Fish
(Electorate abolished 1890–1905; see City of Dunedin)
1905 election James Frederick Arnold
1908 election Thomas Sidey
1911 election
1914 election
1919 election
1922 election
1925 election
1928 election William Burgoyne Taverner
1931 election Fred Jones
1935 election
1938 election
1943 election
(Electorate abolished 1946–1996;
see Central Otago, Mornington, and St Kilda)
1996 election Michael Cullen
1999 election David Benson-Pope
2002 election
2005 election
2008 election Clare Curran
2011 election
2014 election
2017 election

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Dunedin South [14]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Clare Curran 21,40454.11+5.5519,18348.13+15.00
National Matt Gregory12,68732.08−6.1814,16435.53−4.17
Green Shane Gallagher2,0025.06−2.452,3625.92−6.32
NZ First Kerry Maria Rushton1,5914.022,6256.58−2.49
Opportunities Lindsay Smith1,0672.709672.42
Legalise Cannabis Adrian McDermott3321.59900.23−0.22
ACT Daniel Doughty1280.321160.29−0.04
Māori  830.21−0.04
Conservative  540.14−2.78
Ban 1080  390.10−0.10
United Future  260.07−0.10
Outdoors  200.05
People's Party  200.05
Mana  60.02
Internet  50.01
Democrats  40.01−0.20
Informal votes343103
Total Valid votes39,55439,867
Labour holdMajority8,71722.03+11.73

2014 election

2014 general election: Dunedin South [15]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Clare Curran 18,18248.56−0.3312,51833.13−1.84
National Hamish Walker 14,32438.26+1.4915,00339.70−0.48
Green Shane Gallagher2,8137.51−1.774,62612.24−1.37
Conservative Cindy Kerr7271.94+1.941,1042.92+1.44
Legalise Cannabis Julian Crawford4531.21+1.211710.45±0.00
Democrats Warren Voight2340.62−0.07800.21−0.15
Internet Andrew Lepine1770.47+0.47
ACT Colin Nicholls1430.38−0.241250.33−0.27
NZ First  3,4299.07+1.92
Internet Mana  3070.81+0.63 [lower-alpha 1]
Māori  950.25−0.05
Ban 1080  770.20+0.20
United Future  630.17−0.36
Civilian  180.05+0.05
Focus  70.02+0.02
Independent Coalition  50.01+0.01
Informal votes389161
Total Valid votes37,44237,789
Turnout 37,83181.60+4.60
Labour holdMajority3,85810.30−1.82

2011 election

2011 general election: Dunedin South [11]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Clare Curran 16,84448.89-3.4012,32634.97-11.76
National Jo Hayes 12,66936.77+2.0514,16340.18+5.97
Green Shane Gallagher3,1979.28+2.444,79813.61+5.64
NZ First Randall Ratana9792.84+2.842,5227.15+2.59
Democrats Warren Voight2380.69+0.221260.36+0.18
ACT Kimberly Hannah2150.62-0.812100.60-1.51
Restore All Things in ChristRobert Wansink1670.48+0.18
Alliance Kay Murray1420.41-0.13580.16-0.03
Conservative  5201.48+1.48
United Future  1860.53-0.21
Legalise Cannabis  1570.45+0.06
Māori  1070.30-0.13
Mana  620.18+0.18
Libertarianz  160.05+0.01
Informal votes830318
Total Valid votes34,45135,569
Labour holdMajority4,17512.12-5.45

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 45,818 [16]

2008 election

2008 general election: Dunedin South [10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Clare Curran 19,19952.29-4.7117,40846.73-10.40
National Conway Powell12,75034.73+8.0012,74234.20+6.99
Green Shane Gallagher2,5116.84+0.582,9717.98+2.57
ACT Colin Nicholls5281.44+0.797852.11+1.36
Progressive J M McAlpine4981.36-0.564611.24-0.17
United Future Pauline Moffat2640.72-1.782760.74-1.73
Kiwi Philip Wescombe2610.711440.39
Independent David Bernhardt2220.60
Alliance Kay Murray1990.54+0.00720.19+0.05
Democrats Dawn McIntosh1720.47660.18+0.09
Restore All Things in ChristRobert Wansink1130.31+0.05
NZ First  1,7004.56+0.18
Bill and Ben  2090.56
Māori  1600.430.21
Legalise Cannabis  1440.39+0.13
Family Party  580.16
Pacific  170.05
Libertarianz  150.04+0.02
Workers Party  140.04
RONZ  70.02+0.01
RAM  30.01
Informal votes484183
Total Valid votes36,71737,252
Labour holdMajority6,44917.56-12.71

2005 election

2005 general election: Dunedin South [17]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY David Benson-Pope 20,03357.0020,34857.13
National Conway Powell9,39326.739,69227.21
Green Peter Thomlinson2,2006.261,9265.41
NZ First Alan Heward1,1453.261,5634.39
United Future Pauline Moffat7952.268792.47
Progressive Martin Vaughan6721.915001.40
Destiny Brent Daglish4001.141280.36
ACT Alan Wilden2280.652660.75
Alliance Chris Ford1890.54520.15
Restore All Things in ChristRobert Wansink910.26
Legalise Cannabis  900.25
Māori  770.22
Christian Heritage  350.10
Democrats  300.08
Direct Democracy  80.12
Libertarianz  80.02
One NZ  60.02
99 MP  40.01
Family Rights  40.01
RONZ  30.01
Informal votes398127
Total Valid votes35,14635,619
Labour holdMajority10,64030.30

2002 election

2002 general election: Dunedin South
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY David Benson-Pope 20,39863.31+12.4118,31155.89+5.37
National Paul Foster-Bell 5,67417.615,00415.27-7.50
Green Fliss Butcher2,0236.282,0366.21+2.19
United Future Jesse O'Brien1,3384.151,9235.87
ACT Matthew Cain Dwyer8592.671,1443.49+0.06
Progressive Russell Edwards7502.337652.23
Alliance Justin Wilson6011.875641.72-9.98
Christian Heritage Graham Bruce Aldridge5761.793561.09-0.87
NZ First  2,0166.15+4.03
ORNZ  4151.27
Legalise Cannabis  2130.65-0.34
One NZ  90.03
Mana Māori  80.020.00
NMP  10.00-0.02
Informal votes52197
Total Valid votes32,21932,765
Labour holdMajority14,72445.70+15.81

1999 election

1999 general election: Dunedin South [18] [19]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour David Benson-Pope 18,06550.9018,09950.52+10.28
National Russel Keast7,45721.018,15822.77-3.32
Alliance Mark Ryan4,8254,19211.70-2.36
Green Sonata McLeod1,4244.011,4404.02
NZ First Jenny Bloxham 9992.827582.12-6.15
South Island Margaret McCarrigan9122.574131.15
Christian Heritage John Streekstra7342.077041.96
ACT Willie Martin5751.621,2283.43+0.89
Independent Hendrik Kock4971.40
Legalise Cannabis  3560.99-0.90
Christian Democrats  1780.50
United NZ  1490.42-2.24
Libertarianz  480.13+0.12
McGillicuddy Serious  310.09-0.10
Animals First  300.08-0.09
One NZ  130.04
Mana Māori  80.02-0.01
NMP  80.02
Republican  40.01
People's Choice  40.01
Natural Law  30.01
Mauri Pacific  20.01
Freedom Movement  10.00
Informal votes697358
Total Valid votes35,48835,827
Labour holdMajority10,60829.89+17.77

1996 election

1996 general election: Dunedin South [20] [21] [22]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Michael Cullen 12,82936.3714,25340.24
Alliance Leah McBey8,55324.254,97914.06
National Malcolm MacPherson5,85916.619,24126.09
United NZ Clive Matthewson 5,05814.349422.66
NZ First Noeline McGlynn1,7825.052,9298.27
ACT Roland Henderson5051.439012.54
Independent Alan William McDonald4101.16
Progressive Green David Beatty2150.611070.30
Natural Law Inga Schader580.16260.07
Christian Coalition  1,1503.25
Legalise Cannabis  6681.89
McGillicuddy Serious  690.19
Animals First  600.17
Advance New Zealand 370.10
Green Society  190.05
Superannuitants & Youth  120.03
Mana Māori  90.03
Conservatives  80.02
Ethnic Minority Party 60.02
Libertarianz  40.01
Asia Pacific United 20.01
Te Tawharau 00.00
Informal votes269116
Total Valid votes35,26935,422
Labour win new seatMajority4,27612.12

1935 election

1935 general election: Dunedin South [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Jones 7,715 64.01 +6.58
United Stuart Sidey 4,33735.98
Informal votes460.38+0.14
Majority3,37828.02-3.89
Turnout 12,05291.86+3.08
Registered electors 13,119

1931 election

1931 general election: Dunedin South [24] [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Fred Jones 6,559 57.43
United William Burgoyne Taverner [nb 1] 2,91525.52-14.69
Reform Donald Cameron 1,94717.05
Majority3,64431.91
Informal votes280.24-0.78
Turnout 11,44988.78-2.43
Registered electors 12,896

Table footnotes:

  1. William Burgoyne Taverner was the official candidate for the United/Reform Coalition

1928 election

1928 general election: Dunedin South [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
United William Burgoyne Taverner 4,46240.21
Labour R. W. Hall4,42939.92
Reform Charles Todd 2,20519.87
Majority330.30
Informal votes1151.03
Turnout 11,21191.21
Registered electors 12,291

Table footnotes

  1. 2014 Internet Mana swing is relative to the votes for Mana in 2011; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 43–48.
  2. Report of the Representation Commission 2014 (PDF). Representation Commission. 4 April 2014. p. 10. ISBN   978-0-477-10414-2 . Retrieved 26 September 2014.
  3. 1 2 Scholefield 1950, pp. 156–157.
  4. Scholefield 1950, p. 106.
  5. Scholefield 1950, p. 109.
  6. Scholefield 1950, p. 93.
  7. Scholefield 1950, p. 139.
  8. Scholefield 1950, p. 142.
  9. Scholefield 1950, p. 117.
  10. 1 2 "Official Count Results – Dunedin South". Chief Electoral Office. 22 November 2008. Archived from the original on 13 January 2015. Retrieved 27 September 2014.
  11. 1 2 3 "Official Count Results – Dunedin South". Electoral Commission. 10 December 2011. Retrieved 27 September 2014.
  12. Eunson, Keith. "Barnes, James George". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 27 September 2014.
  13. "Agony and ecstasy for Dunedin party faithful". Otago Daily Times . 20 September 2014. Retrieved 27 September 2014.
  14. "Official Count Results – Dunedin South (2017)". Electoral Commission. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  15. Electoral Commission (22 January 2016). "Official Count Results – Dunedin South" . Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  16. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 28 November 2011.
  17. "Official Count Results – Dunedin South". Electoral Commission. 1 October 2005. Retrieved 3 October 2017.
  18. "Official Count Results (1999) – Electoral Votes for registered parties by electorate". NZ Electoral Commission. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  19. "Official Count Results (1999) – Candidate Vote Details". NZ Electoral Commission. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  20. "Electorate Candidate and Party Votes Recorded at Each Polling Place – Dunedin South, 1996" (PDF). Retrieved 12 July 2013.
  21. "Part III – Party Lists of Successful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2013.
  22. "Part III – Party Lists of unsuccessful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2013.
  23. The General Election, 1935. National Library. 1936. pp. 1–35. Retrieved 3 August 2013.
  24. The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 2. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  25. "Prospects in Otago". The New Zealand Herald . LXVIII (21037). 23 November 1931. p. 11. Retrieved 13 November 2014.
  26. The General Election, 1928. Government Printer. 1929. p. 2. Retrieved 4 December 2013.

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Waikato is the name of a current electorate in the New Zealand Parliament. The electorate first existed from 1871 to 1963, and then from 1969 to 1996 when MMP was introduced. The current electorate was re-established for the 2008 election and has been represented by Tim van de Molen for the National Party since the 2017 general election.

Avon is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It was created for the 1861 general election and existed until 1996. It was represented by 13 Members of Parliament and was held by Independents, Liberal Party or Labour Party representatives.

Port Chalmers then Chalmers was a parliamentary electorate in the Otago Region of New Zealand, from 1866 to 1938. It was centred on the town of Port Chalmers, the main port of Dunedin and Otago.

Caversham was a parliamentary electorate in the city of Dunedin in the Otago region of New Zealand, from 1866 to 1908.

Mornington is a former parliamentary electorate from 1946 to 1963, centred on the suburb of Mornington in the city of Dunedin, New Zealand.

Dunedin Central was a parliamentary electorate in the city of Dunedin in Otago, New Zealand from 1881 to 1890 and 1905 to 1984.

Dunedin East was a parliamentary electorate in the city of Dunedin in the Otago region of New Zealand from 1881 to 1890.

Roslyn was a parliamentary electorate in the city of Dunedin in the Otago region of New Zealand from 1866 to 1890.

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