Otago (New Zealand electorate)

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Otago was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate first created for the 1978 election, which was replaced by the Waitaki electorate and Clutha-Southland electorates for the 2008 election. Its last representative was Jacqui Dean of the National Party.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

Waitaki (New Zealand electorate) Current New Zealand electorate

Waitaki is an electorate for the New Zealand House of Representatives that crosses the boundary of North Otago and South Canterbury towns on the East Coast of the South Island. The electorate was first established for the 1871 election that determined the 5th New Zealand Parliament. It has been abolished and re-established several times and in its early years was a two-member electorate for two parliamentary terms. The current electorate has existed since the 2008 election and is held by Jacqui Dean of the National Party.

Contents

Population centres

The 1977 electoral redistribution was the most overtly political since the Representation Commission had been established through an amendment to the Representation Act in 1886, initiated by Muldoon's National Government. [1] As part of the 1976 census, a large number of people failed to fill out an electoral re-registration card, and census staff had not been given the authority to insist on the card being completed. This had little practical effect for people on the general roll, but it transferred Māori to the general roll if the card was not handed in. Together with a northward shift of New Zealand's population, this resulted in five new electorates having to be created in the upper part of the North Island. [2] The electoral redistribution was very disruptive, and 22 electorates were abolished, while 27 electorates were newly created (including Otago) or re-established. These changes came into effect for the 1978 election. [3]

Robert Muldoon 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand

Sir Robert David Muldoon, also known as Rob Muldoon, was a New Zealand politician who served as the 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand, from 1975 to 1984, while Leader of the National Party.

Third National Government of New Zealand

The Third National Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1975 to 1984. It was an economically and socially conservative government, which aimed to preserve the Keynesian economic system established by the First Labour government while also being socially conservative. Throughout its three terms it was led by Robert Muldoon, a populist but antagonistic politician who was sometimes described as his party's best asset and worst liability.

Māori people Indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Māori originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia, who arrived in New Zealand in several waves of canoe voyages some time between 1250 and 1300. Over several centuries in isolation, the Polynesian settlers developed a unique culture, with their own language, a rich mythology, and distinctive crafts and performing arts. Early Māori formed tribal groups based on eastern Polynesian social customs and organisation. Horticulture flourished using plants they introduced; later, a prominent warrior culture emerged.

When the electorate was first formed, it mostly replaced the Otago Central electorate, but also gained areas from the Clutha electorate (including Tapanui and Lawrence) and the coastal strip north of Dunedin from the Oamaru electorate (including Waikouaiti, Palmerston, and Hampden). The main towns that came from the Otago Central electorate were Queenstown, Alexandra, Cromwell, and Wanaka. [4] In the 1983 electoral redistribution, the southern boundary moved north and some towns transferred to the Clutha electorate, including Tapanui, Lawrence, and Roxburgh. To compensate, some outer suburbs of Dunedin on the northern part of Otago Peninsula were gained from the Dunedin North electorate, including St Leonards and Ravensbourne. [5]

Clutha was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate from 1866 to 1996.

Tapanui Town in Otago, New Zealand

Tapanui is a small town in West Otago in New Zealand's South Island, close to the boundary with Southland region. A forestry town, it lies between the foot of the Blue Mountains and the Pomahaka River. Deer stalking and trout fishing are popular pastimes of the area. For almost a hundred years, the town was serviced by the Tapanui Branch railway line, which despite its name never actually terminated in Tapanui. This line was formally opened in late 1880 and closed after being damaged by severe flooding in the region in October 1978. State Highway 90, which links State Highway 1 at McNab, near Gore, to State Highway 8 at Raes Junction, passes through Tapanui. The town is home to Blue Mountain College, which takes students up to year 13.

Lawrence, New Zealand Town in Otago, New Zealand

Lawrence is a small town of 474 inhabitants in Otago, in New Zealand's South Island. It is located on State Highway 8, the main route from Dunedin to the inland towns of Queenstown and Alexandra. It lies 35 kilometres to the northwest of Milton, 11 kilometres northwest of Waitahuna, and close to the Tuapeka River, a tributary of the Clutha.

The electoral redistribution carried out for the 1996 election saw the electorate move further north to now include Twizel. The electoral redistribution carried out after the 2006 census saw Otago abolished, with its area split between the Waitaki and Clutha-Southland electorates.

Twizel Place in Canterbury, New Zealand

Twizel is the largest town in the Mackenzie District, in the Canterbury Region of New Zealand's South Island. The town was founded in 1968 to house construction workers on the Upper Waitaki Hydroelectric Scheme. Twizel has a resident population of 1,280 ; during the summer, holidaymakers nearly triple the town's population.

History

The Otago electorate was first won by Warren Cooper of the National Party in 1978, who had been the representative for the Otago Central electorate since the 1975 election. [6] When Cooper retired at the 1996 election, he was succeeded by Gavan Herlihy. [7] Although Otago was a reasonably safe seat for the National Party, that party's poor showing at the 2002 election saw the Otago constituents elect a Labour MP, David Parker. [7] [8] Three years later in 2005, a swing to National in provincial New Zealand unseated Parker in favour of National's Jacqui Dean. [9] When the Otago electorate was abolished in 2008, Dean transferred to the Waitaki electorate. [10]

Warren Cooper New Zealand politician

Warren Ernest Cooper, is a former New Zealand politician. He was a National Party MP from 1975 to 1996, holding cabinet positions including Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of Defence. Cooper also twice served as Mayor of Queenstown, from 1968 to 1975 and 1995 to 2001.

New Zealand National Party Major New Zealand political party

The New Zealand National Party, shortened to National or the Nats, is a centre-right political party in New Zealand. It is one of two major parties that dominate contemporary New Zealand politics, alongside its traditional rival, the New Zealand Labour Party.

Members of Parliament

Key

  National     Labour     ACT   

Election Winner
1978 election Warren Cooper
1981 election
1984 election
1987 election
1990 election
1993 election
1996 election Gavan Herlihy
1999 election
2002 election David Parker
2005 election Jacqui Dean
(Electorate abolished in 2008; see Waitaki)

List MPs

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Otago electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs' terms began and ended at general elections.

Election Winner
2002 election Gerry Eckhoff
2005 election David Parker

Election results

2005 election

General election, 2005: Otago [9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

The incumbent is the current holder of an office. This term is usually used in reference to elections, in which races can often be defined as being between an incumbent and non-incumbent(s). For example, in the 2017 Hungarian presidential election, János Áder was the incumbent, because he had been the president in the term before the term for which the election sought to determine the president. A race without an incumbent is referred to as an open seat.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Jacqui Dean 17,364 16,333
Labour Red x.svgN David Parker 15,369 14,573
Green Jane Pearce 1,596 2,251
ACT Gerry Eckhoff 848 585
United Future Gerald Telford 620 783
Progressive Barry Silcock 270 389
Democrats Richard Prosser 133 53
Direct Democracy Simon Guy 88 36
NZ First   1,407
Destiny   132
Legalise Cannabis   106
Māori   63
Christian Heritage   38
Alliance   26
99 MP   11
Libertarianz   10
Family Rights   7
RONZ   6
One NZ   4
Informal votes 331 104
Total Valid votes 36,288 36,813
National gain from Labour Majority 1,995

2002 election

General election, 2002: Otago [8]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour David Parker 14,113 12,943
National Red x.svgN Gavan Herlihy 13,429 8,472
ACT Gerry Eckhoff 1,294 1,919
United Future Allan Smellie 1,115 1,779
Christian Heritage Mike Ferguson 544 431
Progressive Hessel van Wieren 438 528
Alliance Sam Huggard 441 260
Green   2,598
NZ First   2,127
ORNZ   635
Legalise Cannabis   232
One NZ   19
NMP   7
Mana Māori   4
Informal votes 489 92
Total Valid votes 31,374 31,954
Labour win new seatMajority 684

1999 election

Refer to Candidates in the New Zealand general election 1999 by electorate#Otago for a list of candidates.

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 8–9, 51, 119.
  2. McRobie 1989, p. 119.
  3. McRobie 1989, pp. 115–120.
  4. McRobie 1989, pp. 117, 121.
  5. McRobie 1989, pp. 121–125.
  6. Wilson 1985, p. 190.
  7. 1 2 Young, Audrey (31 July 2002). "Tears flow as 16 MPs say goodbye". The New Zealand Herald . New Zealand Press Association . Retrieved 12 July 2008.
  8. 1 2 "Official Count Results -- Otago". Chief Electoral Office. 10 August 2002. Retrieved 30 May 2015.
  9. 1 2 "Official Count Results -- Otago". Chief Electoral Office. 1 October 2005. Retrieved 30 May 2015.
  10. "Jacqui Dean". New Zealand Parliament. 19 November 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2015.

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