Helensville (New Zealand electorate)

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Helensville electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election Helensville electorate, 2014.svg
Helensville electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Helensville is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the House of Representatives. The electorate was first established for the 1978 election and was abolished again in 1984, and has existed again since the 2002 election. The MP for Helensville is Chris Penk of the National Party, who has held the seat since the 2017 general election.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

Christopher Aidan Penk is a New Zealand politician and Member of Parliament in the House of Representatives for the National Party.

Contents

Population centres

The 1977 electoral redistribution was the most overtly political since the Representation Commission had been established through an amendment to the Representation Act in 1886, initiated by Muldoon's National Government. [1] As part of the 1976 census, a large number of people failed to fill in an electoral re-registration card, and census staff had not been given the authority to insist on the card being completed. This had little practical effect for people on the general roll, but it transferred Māori to the general roll if the card was not handed in. Together with a northward shift of New Zealand's population, this resulted in five new electorates having to be created in the upper part of the North Island. [2] The electoral redistribution was very disruptive, and 22 electorates were abolished, while 27 electorates were newly created (including Helensville) or re-established. These changes came into effect for the 1978 election. [3]

Robert Muldoon 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand

Sir Robert David Muldoon, also known as Rob Muldoon, was a New Zealand politician who served as the 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand, from 1975 to 1984, while Leader of the National Party.

Third National Government of New Zealand

The Third National Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1975 to 1984. It was an economically and socially conservative government, which aimed to preserve the Keynesian economic system established by the First Labour government while also being socially conservative. Throughout its three terms it was led by Robert Muldoon, a populist but antagonistic politician who was sometimes described as his party's best asset and worst liability.

Māori people Indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Māori originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia, who arrived in New Zealand in several waves of canoe voyages some time between 1250 and 1300. Over several centuries in isolation, the Polynesian settlers developed a unique culture, with their own language, a rich mythology, and distinctive crafts and performing arts. Early Māori formed tribal groups based on eastern Polynesian social customs and organisation. Horticulture flourished using plants they introduced; later, a prominent warrior culture emerged.

In the 1983 electoral redistribution, the Helensville electorate was abolished, and its area went to West Auckland and Rodney. [4] The electorate was re-established in time for the 2002 election in reaction to continued high population growth in and around Auckland. It was made by cutting off the northern flank of the electorate of Waitakere and adding in areas from the electorate of Rodney around its southern boundary.

West Auckland is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate on the western outskirts of Auckland, created for the 1984 election from part of the former Helensville electorate. The electorate was abolished for the 1993 election, and split between Henderson and Waitakere electorates.

Rodney (New Zealand electorate) Current New Zealand electorate

Rodney is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the House of Representatives. The current MP for Rodney is Mark Mitchell of the National Party. He has held this position since 2011.

2002 New Zealand general election

The 2002 New Zealand general election was held on 27 July 2002 to determine the composition of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. It saw the reelection of Helen Clark's Labour Party government, as well as the worst-ever performance by the opposition National Party.

Helensville covers an area of the rapidly growing northern Auckland urban fringe, drawing Helensville and Kumeu from Rodney District, moving south to take in Paremoremo, Greenhithe and Albany from North Shore City, and finally tacking west to include Whenuapai, Hobsonville and West Harbour from Waitakere City.

Auckland Metropolitan area in North Island, New Zealand

Auckland is a city in the North Island of New Zealand. Auckland is the largest urban area in the country, with an urban population of around 1,628,900. It is located in the Auckland Region—the area governed by Auckland Council—which includes outlying rural areas and the islands of the Hauraki Gulf, resulting in a total population of 1,695,900. A diverse and multicultural city, Auckland is home to the largest Polynesian population in the world. The Māori-language name for Auckland is Tāmaki or Tāmaki-makau-rau, meaning "Tāmaki with a hundred lovers", in reference to the desirability of its fertile land at the hub of waterways in all directions.

Helensville Place in Auckland, New Zealand

Helensville is a town in the North Island of New Zealand. It is sited 40 kilometres northwest of Auckland, close to the southern extremity of the Kaipara Harbour. State Highway 16 passes through the town, connecting it to Waimauku 16 km to the south, and Kaukapakapa about 12 km to the north-east. Parakai is 2 km to the north-west. The Kaipara River runs through the town and into the Kaipara Harbour to the north.

Kumeu Place in Auckland, New Zealand

Kumeu is an affluent rural community situated 25 km north-west of the Auckland City centre in New Zealand. State Highway 16 and the North Auckland Line pass through the town. Huapai lies to the west, Riverhead to the north, Whenuapai to the east, West Harbour to the south-east, and Taupaki to the south.

History

John Key's electorate office John Key electorate office.jpg
John Key's electorate office

In the 1978 election, the Helensville electorate was won by Dail Jones, who had been MP for the Waitemata electorate since the 1975 election. [5] After the Helensville electorate was abolished, Jones stood in the West Auckland electorate in the 1984 election but was defeated by the Labour Party candidate, Jack Elder. [6]

Dail Michael John Jones QSO is a New Zealand politician. He has been a member of the New Zealand First party, and was formerly in the National Party.

Waitemata was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, from 1871 to 1946, and then from 1954 to 1978. It was represented by 18 members of parliament.

1975 New Zealand general election

The 1975 New Zealand general election was held on 29 November to elect MPs to the 38th session of the New Zealand Parliament. It was the first general election in New Zealand where 18- to 20-year-olds and all permanent residents of New Zealand were eligible to vote, although only citizens were able to be elected.

Since the Helensville electorate was re-established for the 2002 election, its only MP was the former Prime Minister, John Key, who beat sitting Waitakere MP Brian Neeson to the nomination, and in a tight year for his party, won the electorate by 1,705 votes in a split field when a disgruntled Neeson chose to stand as an independent. Helensville is partly rural, and wealthy beyond the national average, making it a safe National electorate, and Key was returned easily in 2005, 2008 and 2011 with large majorities.

John Key 38th Prime Minister of New Zealand

Sir John Phillip Key is a former New Zealand politician who served as the 38th Prime Minister of New Zealand and Leader of the New Zealand National Party. He was elected leader of the party in November 2006 and appointed Prime Minister in November 2008, resigning from both posts in December 2016. After leaving politics, Key was appointed to board of director and chairmanship roles in New Zealand corporations.

Brian Kevin Neeson is a New Zealand politician. He was an MP from 1990 to 2002, representing the National Party, and a member of the Waitemata District Health Board from 2004 to 2010.

2005 New Zealand general election general election

The 2005 New Zealand general election on Saturday 17 September 2005 determined the membership of the 48th New Zealand Parliament. One hundred and twenty-one MPs were elected to the New Zealand House of Representatives: 69 from single-member electorates, including one overhang seat, and 52 from party lists.

In December 2016, Key announced that he was stepping down as prime minister and would retire from politics before the 2017 general election, citing pressure on his family. [7] The Helensville seat was won in the election by Chris Penk, retaining it for the National Party.

Members of Parliament

Key

  National     NZ First     Labour     ACT     Green   

ElectionWinner
1978 election Dail Jones
1981 election
Electorate abolished in 1984 (see West Auckland and Rodney)
2002 election John Key
2005 election
2008 election
2011 election
2014 election
2017 election Chris Penk

List MPs

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Helensville electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionWinner
2002 election Dail Jones
2008 election Darien Fenton
David Garrett 1
2009 David Clendon 2
2014 election Kennedy Graham

1 Garrett resigned in September 2010, and his list position was taken by Hilary Calvert
2 Clendon entered Parliament in October 2009 following the resignation of Sue Bradford

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Helensville [8]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Chris Penk 21,70456.12−9.0521,95855.83−2.56
Labour Kurt Taogaga7,09618.35+5.6610,01225.45+12.95
Green Hayley Holt 6,75817.47+4.752,9717.55−6.00
NZ First Helen Peterson2,4036.212,7957.11−0.25
ACT Alex Evans2847.34+2.973190.81+0.07
Conservative  870.22−4.56
Opportunities  7992.03
Legalise Cannabis  1120.28−0.17
Māori  1050.27−0.27
United Future  270.07−0.19
Outdoors  200.05
Ban 1080  200.05−0.09
Mana  130.03
People's Party  120.03
Internet  90.02
Democrats  70.02−0.04
Informal votes26467
Total Valid votes38,67639,333
National holdMajority14,60837.77−14.69

2014 election

2014 general election: Helensville [9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY John Key 22,72065.17−9.2120,68958.39−7.40
Green Kennedy Graham 4,43312.72+5.364,80113.55+4.91
Labour Corie Haddock4,42512.69−1.454,43012.50−1.85
Internet Laila Harré 1,3153.77+3.77
Conservative Deborah Dougherty9632.76−0.071,6924.78+1.27
Independent Penny Bright4201.20+1.20
ACT Phelan Pirrie3020.87+0.362620.74−0.65
Independent Brendan Whyte740.21+0.21
NZ First  2,6087.36+2.76
Internet Mana  3380.95+0.78 [lower-alpha 1]
Māori  1920.54+0.02
Legalise Cannabis  1610.45−0.04
United Future  930.26−0.20
Ban 1080  480.14+0.14
Democrats  230.06+0.04
Independent Coalition  130.04+0.04
Civilian  80.02+0.02
Focus  30.01+0.01
Informal votes20873
Total Valid votes34,86035,434
Turnout 35,50782.29+5.65
National holdMajority18,28752.46−7.78

2011 election

2011 general election: Helensville [10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY John Key 26,01174.38+0.7723,55865.79+2.09
Labour Jeremy Greenbrook-Held4,94514.14-2.975,13814.35-4.11
Green Jeanette Elley2,5757.36+1.413,0948.64+3.74
Conservative Richard Drayson9412.69+2.691,2583.51+3.51
Legalise Cannabis Adrian McDermott3190.91+0.911740.49+0.16
ACT Nick Kearney1800.510–1.724991.39-5.31
NZ First  1,6484.60+2.06
Māori  1860.52+0.03
United Future  1630.46-0.33
Mana  600.17+0.17
Libertarianz  190.05-0.004
Democrats  80.02+0.001
Alliance  40.01-0.04
Informal votes574198
Total Valid votes34,97135,809
National holdMajority21,06660.24+3.74

Electorate (as at 11 November 2011): 46,983 [11]

2008 election

2008 general election: Helensville [12] [13]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY John Key 26,77173.61+9.5123,55963.69+8.60
Labour Darien Fenton 6,22417.11-9.776,82618.45-9.52
Green David Clendon 2,1665.96+5.791,8144.90+0.87
ACT David Garrett 8112.23+1.102,4816.71+4.36
United Future Angela Lovelock3090.85-0.822890.78-1.69
Libertarianz Peter Osborne890.24210.06+0.01
NZ First  9402.54-3.34
Progressive  1950.53-0.28
Family Party  1820.49
Māori  1820.49+0.08
Bill and Ben  1700.46
Legalise Cannabis  1310.35+0.16
Kiwi  1050.28
Pacific  450.12
Alliance  190.05+0.02
Workers Party  90.02
Democrats  80.02±0.00
RAM  80.02
RONZ  40.01±0.00
Informal votes251110
Total Valid votes36,37036,988
Turnout 37,29882.27-0.58
National holdMajority20,54756.49


2005 election

2005 general election: Helensville [13] [14] [15]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY John Key 22,00864.10+29.9219,22455.09+29.28
Labour Judy Lawley9,23026.88-0.249,76127.97-2.86
NZ First Dail Jones 1,4004.08-5.452,0515.88-6.06
United Future Andrea Deeth5731.67-2.478632.47-5.82
ACT Stephen Langford-Tebby3891.138212.35-10.26
Māori Awa Hudson3591.051420.41
Progressive Julian Aaron3180.93-0.022180.81-0.08
Direct Democracy Helen Koster580.17110.03
Green  1,4074.03-1.99
Destiny  1510.43
Legalise Cannabis  660.19-0.21
Christian Heritage  480.14-0.85
Libertarianz  160.05
Alliance  90.03-1.00
Democrats  80.02
Family Rights  80.02
99 MP  50.01
RONZ  50.01
One NZ  40.01-0.04
Informal votes253110
Total Valid votes34,33534,896
Turnout 35,22282.85+3.21
National holdMajority12,77837.22+31.26

2002 election

2002 general election: Helensville [14] [16]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National John Key 9,77534.187,52425.81
Labour Gary Russell8,07028.218,98830.83
Independent Brian Neeson 5,64419.73
NZ First Dail Jones 2,7259.533,48111.94
United Future Andrea Deeth1,1844.142,4168.29
Alliance Helen MacKinlay5812.032991.03
Christian Heritage David Simpkin3501.222880.99
Progressive Clare Dickson2730.952720.93
ACT  3,67612.61
Green  1,7556.02
ORNZ  3131.07
Legalise Cannabis  1180.40
One NZ  150.05
Mana Māori  100.03
NMP  20.01
Informal votes32778
Total Valid votes28,60229,157
Turnout 29,42879.64
National win new seatMajority1,7055.96

1981 election

1981 general election: Helensville [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Dail Jones 8,242 35.85 -4.58
Labour Jack Elder 8,02634.91+0.71
Social Credit David Howes6,71829.22
Majority2160.93-5.29
Turnout 22,98689.05+19.21
Registered electors 25,812

1978 election

1978 general election: Helensville [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Dail Jones 7,783 40.43
Labour Jack Elder 6,58434.20
Social Credit Chris Lynch4,51023.43
Values D A P Worley3701.92
Majority1,1996.22
Turnout 19,24769.84
Registered electors 27,558

Table footnotes

  1. 2014 Internet Mana swing is relative to the votes for Mana in 2011; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 8–9, 51, 119.
  2. McRobie 1989, p. 119.
  3. McRobie 1989, pp. 115–120.
  4. McRobie 1989, pp. 118–123.
  5. Wilson 1985, p. 208.
  6. Wilson 1985, pp. 194, 208.
  7. "John Key resigns as Prime Minister of New Zealand, cites family reasons for leaving". The New Zealand Herald . 5 December 2016. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  8. "Official Count Results – Helensville (2017)". Electoral Commission. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  9. Electoral Commission (10 October 2014). "Official Count Results – Helensville" . Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  10. Helensville results, 2011
  11. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 4 November 2011. Retrieved 12 November 2011.
  12. Election results 2008 Archived 11 December 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  13. 1 2 "Helensville:Electoral Profile". New Zealand Parliament. 26 August 2009. Retrieved 5 October 2009.
  14. 1 2 "Electorate Profile Helensville" (PDF). New Zealand Parliament. 1 November 2005. Retrieved 5 October 2009.
  15. Election result 2005 [ permanent dead link ]
  16. Election results 2002
  17. 1 2 Norton 1988, pp. 242.

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References

Coordinates: 36°40′47″S174°26′58″E / 36.6797°S 174.4494°E / -36.6797; 174.4494