Hunua (New Zealand electorate)

Last updated
Hunua electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election Hunua electorate, 2014.svg
Hunua electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

The Hunua electorate existed three times for the New Zealand House of Representatives beginning in 1978, based at the south end of the Auckland urban area, and named for the Hunua Ranges. It covered different geographical areas over those periods. The electorate is currently represented by Andrew Bayly of the National Party.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

Auckland Metropolitan area in North Island, New Zealand

Auckland is a city in the North Island of New Zealand. Auckland is the largest urban area in the country, with an urban population of around 1,628,900. It is located in the Auckland Region—the area governed by Auckland Council—which includes outlying rural areas and the islands of the Hauraki Gulf, resulting in a total population of 1,695,900. A diverse and multicultural city, Auckland is home to the largest Polynesian population in the world. The Māori-language name for Auckland is Tāmaki or Tāmaki-makau-rau, meaning "Tāmaki with a hundred lovers", in reference to the desirability of its fertile land at the hub of waterways in all directions.

Hunua Ranges mountain range

The Hunua Ranges form a block of hilly country to the southeast of Auckland in New Zealand's North Island. They cover some 250 square kilometres (97 sq mi), containing 178 km² of parkland, and rise to 688 metres (2255 ft) at Kohukohunui. Auckland gets much of its water from reservoirs within the Hunua Ranges. The ranges contain many rivers and streams, including the Hunua Falls on the Wairoa River, which is a popular tourist and local spot in the Ranges.

Contents

Population centres

The 1977 electoral redistribution was the most overtly political since the Representation Commission had been established through an amendment to the Representation Act in 1886, initiated by Muldoon's National Government. [1] As part of the 1976 census, a large number of people failed to fill out an electoral re-registration card, and census staff had not been given the authority to insist on the card being completed. This had little practical effect for people on the general roll, but it transferred Māori to the general roll if the card was not handed in. Together with a northward shift of New Zealand's population, this resulted in five new electorates having to be created in the upper part of the North Island. [2] The electoral redistribution was very disruptive, and 22 electorates were abolished, while 27 electorates were newly created (including Hunua) or re-established. These changes came into effect for the 1978 election. [3]

Robert Muldoon 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand

Sir Robert David Muldoon, also known as Rob Muldoon, was a New Zealand politician who served as the 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand, from 1975 to 1984, while Leader of the National Party.

Third National Government of New Zealand

The Third National Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1975 to 1984. It was an economically and socially conservative government, which aimed to preserve the Keynesian economic system established by the First Labour government while also being socially conservative. Throughout its three terms it was led by Robert Muldoon, a populist but antagonistic politician who was sometimes described as his party's best asset and worst liability.

Māori people Indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Māori originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia, who arrived in New Zealand in several waves of canoe voyages some time between 1250 and 1300. Over several centuries in isolation, the Polynesian settlers developed a unique culture, with their own language, a rich mythology, and distinctive crafts and performing arts. Early Māori formed tribal groups based on eastern Polynesian social customs and organisation. Horticulture flourished using plants they introduced; later, a prominent warrior culture emerged.

Population centres of the original electorate included Cockle Bay in the north-west, East Tamaki in the west, the settlement of Hunua itself, Mangatawhiri in the south, and Kaiaua in the east. [2] The electorate existed for two parliamentary periods until the 1983 electoral redistribution, when boundary changes forced its abolition ahead of the 1984 election. [4] [5] The north-west corner went to the newly established Otara electorate, and the remaining part was absorbed by the reconstituted Franklin electorate. [6]

Cockle Bay is an eastern suburb of Auckland, New Zealand. According to the 2006 census, Cockle Bay has a population of 4,779. The suburb is in the Howick ward, one of the 13 administrative divisions of Auckland city and currently under governance of the Auckland Council. The high school of the area is Howick College, a decile 8 school of the Howick area. The primary schools of the area are Cockle Bay School and Shelly Park Primary School.

East Tamaki is a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand. It is a largely industrial area adjacent to a rapidly growing population. Prior to the 1960s it was largely a dairy farming area. A landmark is Smales Mountain which in 2010 has the remains of an old Pa, a stone field garden, an early church, and farm homestead. A newer landmark is the Fo Guang Shan Temple which was the largest Buddhist temple in New Zealand when it opened in 2007.

1984 New Zealand general election

The 1984 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 41st New Zealand Parliament. It marked the beginning of the Fourth Labour Government, with David Lange's Labour Party defeating the long-serving Prime Minister, Robert Muldoon, of the National Party. It was also the last election in which the Social Credit Party won seats as an independent entity. The election was also the only one in which the New Zealand Party, a protest party, played any substantial role.

History

The 1978 election was notable in that Labour candidate Malcolm Douglas held an election night majority of 301 votes. However, National candidate Winston Peters claimed irregularities in the vote, and in a 24 May 1979 ruling, a Court-ordered recount resulted in 500 votes being re-classed as informal, giving Peters a majority of 192. Peters was declared elected as of election night. [7] [8]

The New Zealand Labour Party, or simply Labour, is a centre-left political party in New Zealand. The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism, while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice. It is a participant of the international Progressive Alliance.

Malcolm Douglas was a New Zealand politician of the Labour Party. He lives in Karaka south of Auckland.

Winston Peters New Zealand politician

Winston Raymond Peters is a New Zealand politician who has served since 2017 as the Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand and Minister of Foreign Affairs. He was previously Deputy Prime Minister from 1996 to 1998. Peters has led the populist New Zealand First party since its foundation in 1993. He has been a Member of Parliament since 2011, having previously served from 1979 to 1981 and 1984 to 2008.

The electorate was re-created due to the 1996 change to mixed-member proportional (MMP) voting and the resulting reduction in the number of constituencies. The second historical Hunua electorate contained a selection of dormitory towns in south Auckland, of which Papakura was the largest. The Hunua electorate was abolished again in 2002 and replaced by Papakura.

1996 New Zealand general election

The 1996 New Zealand general election was held on 12 October 1996 to determine the composition of the 45th New Zealand Parliament. It was notable for being the first election to be held under the new mixed-member proportional (MMP) electoral system, and produced a parliament considerably more diverse than previous elections. It saw the National Party, led by Jim Bolger, retain its position in government, but only after protracted negotiations with the smaller New Zealand First party to form a coalition. New Zealand First's position as "kingmaker", able to place either of the two major parties into government, was a significant election outcome.

Mixed-member proportional (MMP) representation is a mixed electoral system in which voters get two votes: one to decide the representative for their single-seat constituency, and one for a political party. Seats in the legislature are filled firstly by the successful constituency candidates, and secondly, by party candidates based on the percentage of nationwide or region-wide votes that each party received. The constituency representatives are elected using first-past-the-post voting (FPTP) or another plurality/majoritarian system. The nationwide or region-wide party representatives are, in most jurisdictions, drawn from published party lists, similar to party-list proportional representation. To gain a nationwide representative, parties may be required to achieve a minimum number of constituency candidates, a minimum percentage of the nationwide party vote, or both.

Papakura is a suburb of Auckland, in northern New Zealand. It is located on the shores of the Pahurehure Inlet, approximately 32 kilometres south of the Auckland CBD. It is under the authority of the Auckland Council.

The electorate was established again for the 2008 election. The new Hunua electorate is based around the southern and eastern fringes of the Auckland region, and contains the Franklin District towns of Pukekohe, Waiuku, Bombay, as well as Clevedon, Whitford and Maraetai from eastern Manukau. The resurrected Hunua electorate officially replaced the redrawn and renamed electorate of Port Waikato.

2008 New Zealand general election election

The 2008 New Zealand general election was held on 8 November 2008 to determine the composition of the 49th New Zealand parliament. The conservative National Party, headed by its parliamentary leader John Key, won the largest share of votes and seats, ending nine years of government by the social-democratic Labour Party, led by Helen Clark. Key announced a week later that he would lead a National minority government with confidence-and-supply support from the ACT, United Future and Māori parties. The Governor-General swore Key in as New Zealand's 38th Prime Minister on 19 November 2008. This marked an end to nine years of Labour Party government, and the beginning of the Fifth National Government of New Zealand which would govern for 9 years, until its loss to the Labour Party in the 2017 general election.

Franklin District Former territorial authority in New Zealand

Franklin District was a New Zealand territorial authority that lay between the Auckland metropolitan area and the Waikato Plains. As a formal territory it was abolished on 31 October 2010 and divided between Auckland Council in the Auckland Region to the north and Waikato and Hauraki districts in the Waikato Region to the south and east. The Auckland portion is now part of the Franklin ward, which also includes rural parts of the former Manukau City.

Pukekohe Secondary urban area in Auckland, New Zealand

Pukekohe is a town in the Auckland Region of the North Island of New Zealand. Located at the southern edge of the Auckland Region, it is in South Auckland, between the southern shore of the Manukau Harbour and the mouth of the Waikato River. The hills of Pukekohe and nearby Bombay Hills form the natural southern limit of the Auckland region. Pukekohe is located within the political boundaries of the Auckland Council, following the abolition of the Franklin District Council on 1 November 2010.

Members of Parliament

Key

  National     Labour     ACT   

ElectionWinner
1978 election Malcolm Douglas
24 May 1979 [note 1] Winston Peters
1981 election Colin Moyle
Electorate abolished 1984–1996; see Otara and Franklin
1996 election Warren Kyd
1999 election
Electorate abolished 2002–2008; see Papakura
2008 election Paul Hutchison
2011 election
2014 election Andrew Bayly
2017 election
  1. The election of Malcolm Douglas was overturned by the Electoral Court on 24 May 1979

List MPs

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Hunua electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionWinner
2008 election Roger Douglas

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Hunua [9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Andrew Bayly 26,82565.91−0.9626,00562.81−0.89
Labour Baljit Kaur7,38218.14+0.469,19922.22+9.16
NZ First Jon Reeves3,0777.56−0.653,5418.55−1.00
Green Phil McCabe6,758+4.751,2372.99−2.78
Independent Ian Cummings7101.74
ACT Anthony Smith2740.67−0.532970.72−0.15
Opportunities  6111.48
Māori  1030.25−0.15
Legalise Cannabis  1020.24−0.14
Conservative  760.18−4.84
United Future  350.08−0.19
Ban 1080  330.08−0.17
Outdoors  270.07
People's Party  240.06
Mana  80.02
Internet  70.02
Democrats  50.01−0.04
Informal votes42791
Total Valid votes40,69741,401
National holdMajority19,44347.77−1.42

2014 election

2014 general election: Hunua [10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Andrew Bayly 23,62166.87+1.2822,92963.70+1.12
Labour Arena Williams6,24517.68+0.924,69913.06−3.05
NZ First Jon Reeves2,9008.21+4.133,4379.55+2.13
Conservative Neville Hudson1,4334.06+0.071,8075.02+1.29
ACT Ian Cummings4251.20−0.083130.87−0.58
Māori Thomas T. T. Phillips2440.69+0.131440.40−0.13
Democrats Huia Mitchell960.27+0.03190.05−0.03
Green  2,0765.77−1.11
Internet Mana  1660.46+0.25 [lower-alpha 1]
Legalise Cannabis  1360.38−0.05
United Future  820.23−0.25
Ban 1080  460.13+0.13
Civilian  140.04+0.04
Independent Coalition  40.01+0.01
Focus  40.01+0.01
Informal votes360117
Total Valid votes35,32435,993
Turnout 36,11080.61+5.18
National holdMajority17,37649.19+0.36

2011 election

2011 general election: Hunua [11]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Paul Hutchison 22,56365.59+1.1822,16162.58+1.94
Labour Richard Hills 5,76616.76-1.055,70516.11-3.60
Green Charmaine A Watts2,5767.49+3.012,4386.88+3.52
NZ First Doug Nabbs1,4054.08+1.152,6267.42+3.04
Conservative Kevin Campbell1,3733.99+3.991,3203.73+3.73
ACT Ian Cummings4401.28-7.745151.45-6.79
Māori Thomas Tuatu Toihau Phillips1940.56+0.561880.53-0.01
Democrats Huia Mitchell810.24+0.24300.08+0.06
United Future  1700.48-0.34
Legalise Cannabis  1540.43+0.11
Mana  750.21+0.21
Libertarianz  250.07+0.04
Alliance  40.01-0.03
Informal votes699204
Total Valid votes34,39835,411
National holdMajority16,79748.83+2.23

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 47,215 [12]

2008 election

2008 general election: Hunua [13]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Paul Hutchison 21,92064.4121,03260.64
Labour Jordan Carter6,06217.816,83619.71
ACT Roger Douglas 3,0689.022,8598.24
Green Fiona Kenworthy (Shaw)1,5254.481,1683.37
NZ First Helen Mulford9972.931,5164.37
Kiwi Frank Naea2090.611300.37
United Future Toni Driller1950.572860.82
Libertarianz Bruce Whitehead560.16100.03
Bill and Ben  1990.57
Progressive  1940.56
Māori  1890.54
Legalise Cannabis  1120.32
Family Party  950.27
Pacific  210.06
Alliance  160.05
Workers Party  90.03
Democrats  70.02
RONZ  30.01
RAM  20.01
Informal votes299118
Total Valid votes34,03234,684
National win new seatMajority15,858

1999 election

Template:MMP election bx candidate

1999 general election: Hunua
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Warren Kyd 15,07248.07+9.1412,11838.23-3.71
Labour Paul Schofield9,87731.50+15.069,43029.75+8.45
Alliance Janice Graham1,8785.991,7785.61-0.68
ACT John Thompson1,7135.463,54311.18+4.14
NZ First John Geary1,4794.721,5614.93-8.81
Christian Heritage Ken Andrew7842.507802.46
Natural Law Raylene Lodge1700.54410.13+0.04
Green  1,3634.30
Legalise Cannabis  3401.07-0.53
United NZ  1830.58-2.03
Libertarianz  960.30+0.25
McGillicuddy Serious  560.18-0.10
Animals First  540.17-0.05
One NZ  250.08
NMP  210.07
Mana Māori  140.04+0.02
Mauri Pacific  110.03
Republican  70.02
Freedom Movement  30.01
South Island  20.01
People's Choice  20.01
Informal votes606268
Total Valid votes31,35631,694
National holdMajority5,19516.57-0.03

1996 election

1996 general election: Hunua [14] [15] [16]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Warren Kyd 11,95338.9312,93241.94
United NZ John Robertson 6,85522.338052.61
Labour Paul Schofield5,04916.446,56921.30
NZ First Patra de Coudray3,26710.644,23713.74
Alliance Huia Mitchell1,6825.481,9386.29
Christian Coalition Enosa Auva'a1,0173.311,3284.31
ACT Simon Harding7392.412,1707.04
Natural Law Mike Dunn1030.34270.09
Republican Sophie James400.13
Legalise Cannabis  4921.60
McGillicuddy Serious  860.28
Progressive Green  830.27
Animals First  690.22
Ethnic Minority Party 310.10
Green Society  180.06
Superannuitants & Youth  150.05
Libertarianz  150.05
Advance New Zealand 70.02
Mana Māori  60.02
Conservatives  30.01
Asia Pacific United 20.01
Te Tawharau 10.00
Informal votes22596
Total Valid votes30,70530,834
National win new seatMajority5,09816.60

1981 election

1981 general election: Hunua [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Colin Moyle 9,343 43.85
National Winston Peters 8,34739.17-3.88
Social Credit Geoff Morell3,51916.51+3.06
Independent National Ian Sampson960.45
Majority9964.67
Turnout 21,30590.01
Registered electors 23,669

1978 election

1978 general election: Hunua [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Winston Peters 7,507 43.05
Labour Malcolm Douglas 7,31541.95
Social Credit Geoff Morell2,34613.45
Values B P Robinson2681.53
Majority1921.10
Turnout 17,436N/A
Registered electors N/A

Table footnotes

  1. 2014 Internet Mana swing is relative to the votes for Mana in 2011; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 8–9, 51, 119.
  2. 1 2 McRobie 1989, p. 119.
  3. McRobie 1989, pp. 115–120.
  4. Wilson 1985, p. 265.
  5. McRobie 1989, pp. 119, 123.
  6. McRobie 1989, pp. 118–123.
  7. "New Zealand Labour Party. Hunua Electorate (B478)". National Archive of Manuscripts and Records. 1 May 2000. Retrieved 6 November 2008.[ dead link ]
  8. Wilson 1985, pp. 193, 226.
  9. "Official Count Results -- Hunua (2017)". Electoral Commission. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  10. Electoral Commission (10 October 2014). "Official Count Results – Hunua" . Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  11. 2011 election results
  12. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  13. 2008 election results Archived December 11, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  14. "Electorate Candidate and Party Votes Recorded at Each Polling Place - Hunua, 1996" (PDF). Retrieved 13 July 2013.
  15. "Part III - Party Lists of Successful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2013.
  16. "Part III - Party Lists of unsuccessful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2013.
  17. 1 2 Norton 1988, p. 249.

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References