OurNZ Party

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OurNZ logo, as registered with the NZ Electoral Commission Our NZ Logo CMYK 0.jpg
OurNZ logo, as registered with the NZ Electoral Commission

The OurNZ Party was a political party in New Zealand. The party advocated a new currency, a 1% transaction tax, a written constitution, and binding referenda. [1] Its founding leaders were former Direct Democracy Party leader Kelvyn Alp and Rangitunoa Black. [2]

A political party is an organized group of people, often with common views, who come together to contest elections and hold power in the government. The party agrees on some proposed policies and programmes, with a view to promoting the collective good or furthering their supporters' interests.

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Direct Democracy Party of New Zealand political party in New Zealand

The Direct Democracy Party (DDP) of New Zealand (2005-2009) was a political party in New Zealand that promoted greater participation by the people in the decision-making of government. The party's leader was Kelvyn Alp.

Contents

Kelvyn Alp represented the party in the June 2011 Te Tai Tokerau by-election, [2] [3] gaining 72 votes, coming last in a field of five. [4]

In September 2011 the party's logo was registered by the Electoral Commission, [5] and announced it would merge with the Republic of New Zealand Party. [6]

Kelvyn Alp announced his departure from his role on 25 September, saying that Will Ryan would take over as interim party leader. [7] Although the party had expressed an intention to contest the November 2011 general election, and had selected at least one person to stand for it, [8] there were no OurNZ candidates registered with the Electoral Commission when nominations closed. [9] It did not stand any candidates at the 2014 election.

See also

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References

  1. "Principles and objectives". OurNZ Party. Retrieved 2011-05-31.[ dead link ]
  2. 1 2 "OurNZ Party's Kelvyn Alp to contest Te Tai Tokerau By-Election". Infonews. 2011-05-14. Retrieved 2011-05-31.
  3. "Five parties vie for Tai Tokerau". Stuff. 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-05-31.
  4. "Official Count Results -- Te Tai Tokerau Byelection". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 2011-07-06. Retrieved 2011-09-29.
  5. "Applications to register political party logos approved". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 2011-09-08. Archived from the original on 2011-11-10. Retrieved 2011-09-12.
  6. "Our NZ has a constitution". Scoop.co.nz. 5 September 2011.
  7. "OurNZ Facebook post". 2011-10-25. Retrieved 2011-11-14.
  8. "Alexandra man puts hand up for party; Former Young Nat backs OURNZ". Timaru Herald. 30 July 2011.
  9. "Where to vote and who is standing". Elections New Zealand. 2011-11-02. Archived from the original on 2008-10-16. Retrieved 2011-11-02.