New Zealand Representative Party

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Proposed New Zealand Representative Party logo NZRepresentativePartyLogo.jpg
Proposed New Zealand Representative Party logo

The New Zealand Representative Party was a political party in New Zealand. The party's leader was Reg Turner, a former candidate for the ACT Party. [1]

A political party is an organized group of people, often with common views, who come together to contest elections and hold power in the government. The party agrees on some proposed policies and programmes, with a view to promoting the collective good or furthering their supporters' interests.

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

ACT New Zealand New Zealand political party

ACT New Zealand, usually known as ACT, is a right-wing, classical-liberal political party in New Zealand. According to former party leader Rodney Hide, ACT stands for "individual freedom, personal responsibility, doing the best for our natural environment and for smaller, smarter government in its goals of a prosperous economy, a strong society, and a quality of life that is the envy of the world".

The party claimed to have no policies and to oppose traditional left-right politics. [2] Despite these claims, it also promoted populist referenda, deregulation, compulsory military service, "stopping the culture for young unmarried women to have babies", and restricting the welfare state. [2] It is thus better described as a right-wing party.[ POV? ][ citation needed ]

Welfare state Government promoting its peoples welfare

The welfare state is a form of government in which the state protects and promotes the economic and social well-being of the citizens, based upon the principles of equal opportunity, equitable distribution of wealth, and public responsibility for citizens unable to avail themselves of the minimal provisions for a good life. Historically, the Islamic Caliphate under Umar was the first welfare state. In modern history, late-19th-century Imperial Germany (1871–1918) was the first welfare state, which Chancellor Otto von Bismarck established with the social-welfare legislation that extended the privileges of the Junker social class to ordinary Germans. Sociologist T. H. Marshall described the modern welfare state as a distinctive combination of democracy, welfare, and capitalism.

The NZRP believed that list MPs in New Zealand's mixed member proportional electoral system are not properly accountable to voters. As a result, it would run only electorate candidates, and promised to support the party chosen by the majority of the electorate. [2]

Electoral system of New Zealand

The New Zealand electoral system has been mixed-member proportional (MMP) since 1996. MMP was introduced after a referendum in 1993. MMP replaced the first-past-the-post (FPP) system New Zealand had previously used for most of its history.

The party applied to register its logo with the Electoral Commission, [1] but the application was refused as the logo could confuse voters. [3]

The party ran only a single candidate in the 2008 election. By 2010, its website was defunct. It did not run any candidates in the 2011 election.

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The Kiwi Party was a political party operating in New Zealand between 2007 and 2011. Briefly known as Future New Zealand, it was a breakaway from the United Future New Zealand party and sought to carry on the tradition of Future New Zealand. The party was formed when MP Gordon Copeland left United Future after a dispute over support for the Crimes Amendment Act 2007. At the 2008 general election, the Kiwi Party was unsuccessful, and was not re-elected to Parliament. It did not contest the 2011 general election under its own banner, but the leaders and other members stood for the Conservative Party.

The Nga Iwi Morehu Movement was a New Zealand Māori political party. Its name literally translates as "the surviving people" or "the remnant people". It contested the 1996 election as an unregistered party, running a single candidate and gaining 194 votes. It ran two candidates in the 2002 election, winning 522 votes. In the 1999 election, members of Nga Iwi Morehu stood under the banner of the Freedom Movement.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

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New World Order Party

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The Ban 1080 Party is an unregistered political party in New Zealand. The party was founded in 2014 by Bill Wallace. It opposes the use of 1080 poison, which is widely used in New Zealand for controlling mammalian pests such as possums and rats. The party's co-leaders are Bill Wallace and Mike Downard.

The Money Free Party is a political movement that has parties in 16 countries: United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, Canada, United States, Sri Lanka, Portugal, South Africa, India, Italy, Ghana, Brazil, Argentina, Netherlands, Belgium and Romania. The party advocates for a Resource-based economy (RBE), a world of free access where all work is voluntary. The party has also established RBE groups in other countries around the world. It is based upon the ideals of Jacque Fresco, as advocated by the US-based The Venus Project.

The New Zealand Outdoors Party is a registered political party in New Zealand. The Party is led by Co-Leaders Alan Simmons and David Haynes and seeks to protect New Zealand's environment and "outdoors heritage."

References

  1. 1 2 "Application to register political party logo". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 16 September 2008. Archived from the original on October 15, 2008. Retrieved 16 September 2008.
  2. 1 2 3 "NZRP Website" . Retrieved 17 September 2008.[ dead link ]
  3. "Logo no go, Nelson no go, and same goes for 1080". Stuff.co.nz. Nelson Mail. Retrieved 16 January 2017.