New Zealand Liberal Party (2008)

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The Liberal Party was a political party in New Zealand which promoted social liberalism. It was founded on 10 March 2008. [1]

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Social liberalism is a political ideology and a variety of liberalism that endorses a regulated free market economy and the expansion of civil and political rights. A social liberal government is expected to address economic and social issues such as poverty, health care and education in a liberal state. It does so in allowing autonomy of the individual and products of the market economy unrestricted access with the goal to increase wellbeing for all.

The party was an attempt to revive the old New Zealand Liberal Party. It aimed to be a broad progressive party which appeals to middle New Zealand. Policies included a written constitution, [2] improved public healthcare, and universal pre-school education. [3]

The New Zealand Liberal Party was the first organised political party in New Zealand. It governed from 1891 until 1912. The Liberal strategy was to create a large class of small land-owning farmers who supported Liberal ideals, by buying large tracts of Māori land and selling it to small farmers on credit. The Liberal Government also established the basis of the later welfare state, with old age pensions, developed a system for settling industrial disputes, which was accepted by both employers and trade unions. In 1893 it extended voting rights to women, making New Zealand the first country in the world to enact universal female suffrage.

The party was led by Jonathan Lee, a former public servant and policy advisor to Bill Birch. [4] It applied to register a party logo with the Electoral Commission on 13 March 2008. [5] This application was accepted on 2 April 2008 [6] On 24 April 2008 the party applied for broadcasting funding; [7] according to their initial submission the party has incorporated and is seeking candidates and a patron to publicly endorse the party. [8]

Bill Birch politician

Sir William Francis Birch, usually known as Bill Birch, is a former New Zealand politician. He served as Minister of Finance for several years in the fourth National government.

The party was not registered for the 2008 General Election, and did not stand any candidates. As of May 2010, its website was defunct.

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References

  1. Press Release: Liberal Party (2008-03-10). "Liberal Party Launches Draft Constitution for NZ". Scoop.co.nz. Retrieved 2011-11-09.
  2. "First Draft Constitution of NZ" (PDF). Retrieved 2011-11-09.
  3. About the Liberals
  4. "Biographical Sketch of Jonathan Lee" (PDF). Retrieved 2011-11-09.
  5. "Applications to register political party logos", New Zealand Electoral Commission, 13 March 2008
  6. "Five party logos and abbreviated party name registered", New Zealand Electoral Commission, 2 April 2008.
  7. "Commission to hear parties on broadcasting time and funding" Archived 2008-10-15 at the Wayback Machine ., New Zealand Electoral Commission, 24 April 2008
  8. "Submission to the Electoral Commission on allocation of broadcasting time and funds" (PDF). Retrieved 2011-11-09.[ permanent dead link ]