North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer

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North Carolina Tar Heels
women's soccer
Soccerball current event.svg 2019 North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team
North Carolina Tar Heels logo.svg
University University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Head coach Anson Dorrance (43rd season)
Conference ACC
Location Chapel Hill, NC
Stadium Dorrance Field
(Capacity: 4,200)
Nickname Tar Heels
ColorsCarolina Blue and White [1]
         
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Home
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Away
NCAA Tournament championships
1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012
NCAA Tournament runner-up
1985, 1998, 2001, 2018, 2019
NCAA Tournament Semifinals
1995, 2002, 2016, 2018, 2019
NCAA Tournament appearances
1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 [2]
Conference Tournament championships
1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2017, 2019
Conference Regular Season championships
1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2018, 2019
North Carolina Tar Heels celebrate winning the 2006 Women's College Cup. North Carolina Tar Heels 2006 College Cup Champions.jpg
North Carolina Tar Heels celebrate winning the 2006 Women's College Cup.

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I soccer. [3] The team has won 23 of the 27 Atlantic Coast Conference championships, and 21 of the 38 NCAA national championships.

Contents

History

The UNC women's soccer team began as a club team established by students looking for high level competition. In 1979, they petitioned the UNC Athletic Director, Bill Cobey, to take the club to the varsity level. Cobey asked Anson Dorrance, then the UNC men's soccer coach to assess the club's ability to transition to varsity status. Dorrance was impressed enough by the club, then coached by Mike Byers, to recommend that the school form a women's soccer team. Cobey agreed and hired Dorrance as head coach, with Byers as an assistant, for the 1978 season. That year, the Tar Heels played an essentially club schedule, including games against high school teams. However, in 1979, the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, at the prompting of Dorrance and University of Colorado coach, Chris Lidstone, established a national women's soccer program. [4] At the time, UNC had the only varsity women's soccer team in the Southeast and this allowed Dorrance to recruit the top talent in the region. In 1981, he recruited one of the most talented freshman squads in the history of women's soccer. Eight of those recruits won starting positions and took the team to the first, and only, AIAW national championship. This group would set the tone for Tar Heels soccer for down through its history. As Dorrance recalls it, "These were the true pioneers. They were given nothing. They were accustomed to taking things and so they weren't as genteel as the sort of young ladies we can recruit now. . . They were the sort of girls who would go downtown, burn it to the ground, . . . But then, they were on time for every single practice and in practice they worked themselves until they were bleeding and throwing up. They had a tremendous commitment to victory and to personal athletic excellence. And for that I admired them because they were a tremendous group. And even though, off the field, I think they all hated each other. But once the game began, there was a collective fury that just intimidated everyone they played against." [5] Building on that competitive drive, the Tar Heels went on to win the first three NCAA championships, and dominate the sport for years to come.

All-time record

  Year  Head Coach  Overall  ACC  ACC Tournament    NCAA Tournament  
1979  Anson Dorrance  10–2–0
198021–5–0AIAW Semifinals
198123–0–0AIAW Champions
198219–2–0Champions
198319–1–0Champions
198424–0–1Champions
198518–2–1Runner Up
198624–0–1Champions
198723–0–13–0–0Champions
198818–0–31–0–1Runner UpChampions
198924–0–14–0–0ChampionsChampions
199020–1–14–0–0ChampionsChampions
199124–0–04–0–0ChampionsChampions
199225–0–04–0–0ChampionsChampions
199323–0–04–0–0ChampionsChampions
199425–1–15–1–0ChampionsChampions
199525–1–07–0–0ChampionsSemifinals
199625–1–07–0–0ChampionsChampions
199727–0–17–0–0ChampionsChampions
199825–1–07–0–0ChampionsRunner Up
199924–2–07–0–0ChampionsChampions
200021–3–04–3–0ChampionsChampions
200124–1–07–0–0ChampionsRunner Up
200221–2–44–1–2ChampionsSemifinals
200327–0–07–0–0ChampionsChampions
200420–1–29–0–0Runner UpThird Round
200523–1–19–1–0ChampionsQuarterfinals
200627–1–010–0–0ChampionsChampions
200719–4–19–1–0ChampionsThird Round
200825–1–29–0–1ChampionsChampions
200923–3–19–3–0ChampionsChampions
201019–3–29–3–0SemifinalsThird Round
201113–5–26–3–1QuarterfinalsThird Round
201215–5–36–3–1QuarterfinalsChampions
201320–5–010–3–0SemifinalsQuarterfinals
201414–4–29–0–1SemifinalsThird Round
201515–5–17–3–0SemifinalsSecond Round
201617–4–46–2–2Runner UpSemifinals
201717–3–28–0–2ChampionsThird Round
201821–4–210–0–0Runner UpRunner Up
201924–1–29–0–1ChampionsRunner Up

Current Roster

Updated August 14, 2019 [6]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.PositionPlayer
0 Flag of the United States.svg GK Claudia Dickey
1 Flag of the United States.svg FW Madison Schultz
3 Flag of the United States.svg FW Ru Mucherera
4 Flag of the United States.svg FW Bridgette Andrzejewski
5 Flag of the United States.svg MF Mary Elliot McCabe
6 Flag of the United States.svg FW Taylor Otto
7 Flag of the United States.svg DF Julia Dorsey
8 Flag of the United States.svg MF Brianna Pinto
9 Flag of the United States.svg MF Rachel Dorwart
10 Flag of the United States.svg MF Rachel Jones
11 Flag of the United States.svg MF Emily Fox
12 Flag of the United States.svg FW Alexis Strickland
13 Flag of the United States.svg FW Isabel Cox
14 Flag of the United States.svg MF Morgan Goff
15 Flag of the United States.svg FW Zoe Redei
16 Flag of the United States.svg FW Aleigh Gambone
No.PositionPlayer
17 Flag of the United States.svg GK Marz Josephson
18 Flag of the United States.svg MF Natalie Chandler
19 Flag of England.svg FW Alessia Russo
20 Flag of the United States.svg MF Libby Moore
21 Flag of the United States.svg MF Miah Araba
22 Flag of the United States.svg DF Tori Hansen
23 Flag of England.svg DF Lotte Wubben-Moy
25 Flag of the United States.svg DF Maycee Bell
26 Flag of the United States.svg FW Hallie Klanke
27 Flag of the United States.svg DF Lois Joel
28 Flag of the United States.svg MF Maggie Pierce
30 Flag of the United States.svg DF Brooke Bingham
45 Flag of the United States.svg MF Cameron Keating
52 Flag of the United States.svg FW Izzy Brown
99 Flag of the United States.svg MF Laura Sparling

Individual honors

National Coach of the Year:

ACC Coach of the Year:

Mia Hamm won numerous awards with the Tar Haeels Mia Hamm signing an autograph.jpg
Mia Hamm won numerous awards with the Tar Haeels

Hermann Trophy:

ACC Player of the Year:

ACC Defensive Player of the Year:

Yael Averbuch, ACC Defensive Player of the Year in 2006 Yael Averbuch with flag.jpg
Yael Averbuch, ACC Defensive Player of the Year in 2006

ACC Offensive Player of the Year:

ACC Rookie of the Year:

NCAA Tournament MVP:

Offensive Player of the NCAA Tournament:

Defensive Player of the Tournament:

First Team All-America Selection: As of 2011, North Carolina had 70 players gain first-team All-American recognition. The next two schools with the greatest number of All-Americans were tied with twenty-two each. [7]

Notable Alumnae

Tisha Venturini

Mia Hamm

Sarina Wiegman

Kristine Lilly

Heather O'Reilly

Meghan Klingenberg

Lori Chalupny

Whitney Engen

Lucy Bronze

Katie Bowen

Tobin Heath

Crystal Dunn

Kendall Fletcher

Ashlyn Harris

Allie Long

Jessica McDonald

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References

  1. Carolina Athletics Brand Identity Guidelines (PDF). April 20, 2015. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  2. "2009 North Carolina Women's Soccer Media Guide." "tarheelblue.com." Retrieved on May 20, 2010.
  3. "2007 North Carolina Women's Soccer Media Guide." tarheelblue.com. Retrieved on March 23, 2009.
  4. EXPLAINING VARIATION IN THE SEX COMPOSITION OF COACHES FOR WOMEN’S INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC TEAMS [ permanent dead link ]
  5. Interview with Anson Dorrance, June 11, 1991
  6. "2019 Women's Soccer Roster". goheels.com. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Athletics. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  7. "Official 2012 NCAA Men's and Women's Soccer Records Book." ncaa.org. Retrieved on March 23, 2008.