North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer

Last updated

North Carolina Tar Heels
women's soccer
Soccerball current event.svg 2019 North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team
North Carolina Tar Heels logo.svg
University University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Head coach Anson Dorrance (41st season)
Conference ACC
Location Chapel Hill, NC
Stadium Fetzer Field
(Capacity: 5,025)
Nickname Tar Heels
ColorsCarolina Blue and White [1]
         
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body vneckwhite.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Home
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body vneckwhite.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Away
NCAA Tournament championships
1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012
NCAA Tournament runner-up
1985, 1998, 2001, 2018
NCAA Tournament Semifinals
1995, 2002, 2016, 2018
NCAA Tournament appearances
1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 [2]
Conference Tournament championships
1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2017
Conference Regular Season championships
1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2018
North Carolina Tar Heels celebrate winning the 2006 Women's College Cup. North Carolina Tar Heels 2006 College Cup Champions.jpg
North Carolina Tar Heels celebrate winning the 2006 Women's College Cup.

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I soccer. [3] The team has won 20 of the 27 Atlantic Coast Conference championships, and 22 of the 36 NCAA national championships.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, also known as UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, or simply Carolina is a public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It is the flagship of the 17 campuses of the University of North Carolina system. After being chartered in 1789, the university first began enrolling students in 1795, which also allows it to be one of three schools to claim the title of the oldest public university in the United States. Among the claimants, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the only one to have held classes and graduated students as a public university in the eighteenth century.

Atlantic Coast Conference American collegiate athletics conference

The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic conference in the United States of America in which its fifteen member universities compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I, with its football teams competing in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest levels for athletic competition in US-based collegiate sports. The ACC sponsors competition in twenty-five sports with many of its member institutions' athletic programs held in high regard nationally. Current members of the conference are Boston College, Clemson University, Duke University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Florida State University, North Carolina State University, Syracuse University, the University of Louisville, the University of Miami, the University of North Carolina, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Wake Forest University.

NCAA Division I highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association

NCAA Division I (D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition.

Contents

History

The UNC women's soccer team began as a club team established by students looking for high level competition. In 1979, they petitioned the UNC Athletic Director, Bill Cobey, to take the club to the varsity level. Cobey asked Anson Dorrance, then the UNC men's soccer coach to assess the club's ability to transition to varsity status. Dorrance was impressed enough by the club, then coached by Mike Byers, to recommend that the school form a women's soccer team. Cobey agreed and hired Dorrance as head coach, with Byers as an assistant, for the 1978 season. That year, the Tar Heels played an essentially club schedule, including games against high school teams. However, in 1979, the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, at the prompting of Dorrance and University of Colorado coach, Chris Lidstone, established a national women's soccer program. [4] At the time, UNC had the only varsity women's soccer team in the Southeast and this allowed Dorrance to recruit the top talent in the region. In 1981, he recruited one of the most talented freshman squads in the history of women's soccer. Eight of those recruits won starting positions and took the team to the first, and only, AIAW national championship. This group would set the tone for Tar Heels soccer for down through its history. As Dorrance recalls it, "These were the true pioneers. They were given nothing. They were accustomed to taking things and so they weren't as genteel as the sort of young ladies we can recruit now. . . They were the sort of girls who would go downtown, burn it to the ground, . . . But then, they were on time for every single practice and in practice they worked themselves until they were bleeding and throwing up. They had a tremendous commitment to victory and to personal athletic excellence. And for that I admired them because they were a tremendous group. And even though, off the field, I think they all hated each other. But once the game began, there was a collective fury that just intimidated everyone they played against." [5] Building on that competitive drive, the Tar Heels went on to win the first three NCAA championships, and dominate the sport for years to come.

Bill Cobey American politician

William Wilfred Cobey, Jr., known as Bill Cobey, is a former one-term Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from North Carolina.

Anson Dorrance American soccer player-coach

Albert Anson Dorrance IV is an American soccer coach. He is currently the head coach of the women's soccer program at the University of North Carolina. He has one of the most successful coaching records in the history of athletics. Under Dorrance's leadership, the Tar Heels have won 21 of the 31 NCAA Women's Soccer Championships. The Tar Heels' record under Dorrance stood at 809-67-36 over 33 seasons at the end of the 2017 season. He has led his team to a 101-game unbeaten streak and coached 13 different women to a total of 20 National Player of the Year awards. The NCAA has recognized Dorrance as the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year seven times and as the Men's Soccer Coach of the Year in 1987. On March 10, 2008 Dorrance was elected to the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women US womens college sports association

The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) was founded in 1971 to govern collegiate women's athletics in the United States and to administer national championships. It evolved out of the Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. The association was one of the biggest advancements for women's athletics on the collegiate level. Throughout the 1970s, the AIAW grew rapidly in membership and influence, in parallel with the national growth of women's sports following the enactment of Title IX. The AIAW functioned in the equivalent role for college women's programs that the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) had been doing for men's programs. Owing to its own success, the AIAW was in a vulnerable position that precipitated conflicts with the NCAA in the early 1980s. Following a one-year overlap in which both organizations staged women's championships, the AIAW discontinued operation, and most member schools continued their women's athletics programs under the governance of the NCAA.

All-time record

  Year  Head Coach  Overall  ACC  ACC Tournament    NCAA Tournament  
1979  Anson Dorrance  10–2–0
198021–5–0AIAW Semifinals
198123–0–0AIAW Champions
198219–2–0Champions
198319–1–0Champions
198424–0–1Champions
198518–2–1Runner Up
198624–0–1Champions
198723–0–13–0–0Champions
198818–0–31–0–1Runner UpChampions
198924–0–14–0–0ChampionsChampions
199020–1–14–0–0ChampionsChampions
199124–0–04–0–0ChampionsChampions
199225–0–04–0–0ChampionsChampions
199323–0–04–0–0ChampionsChampions
199425–1–15–1–0ChampionsChampions
199525–1–07–0–0ChampionsSemifinals
199625–1–07–0–0ChampionsChampions
199727–0–17–0–0ChampionsChampions
199825–1–07–0–0ChampionsRunner Up
199924–2–07–0–0ChampionsChampions
200021–3–04–3–0ChampionsChampions
200124–1–07–0–0ChampionsRunner Up
200221–2–44–1–2ChampionsSemifinals
200327–0–07–0–0ChampionsChampions
200420–1–29–0–0Runner UpThird Round
200523–1–19–1–0ChampionsQuarterfinals
200627–1–010–0–0ChampionsChampions
200719–4–19–1–0ChampionsThird Round
200825–1–29–0–1ChampionsChampions
200923–3–19–3–0ChampionsChampions
201019–3–29–3–0SemifinalsThird Round
201113–5–26–3–1QuarterfinalsThird Round
201215–5–36–3–1QuarterfinalsChampions
201320–5–010–3–0SemifinalsQuarterfinals
201414–4–29–0–1SemifinalsThird Round
201515–5–17–3–0SemifinalsSecond Round
201617–4–46–2–2Runner UpSemifinals
201717–3–28–0–2ChampionsThird Round
201821–4–210–0–0Runner UpRunner Up

Current Roster

Updated August 14, 2019 [6]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

As the governing body of association football, FIFA is responsible for maintaining and implementing the rules that determine whether an association football player is eligible to represent a particular country in officially recognised international competitions and friendly matches. In the 20th century, FIFA allowed a player to represent any national team, as long as the player held citizenship of that country. In 2004, in reaction to the growing trend towards naturalisation of foreign players in some countries, FIFA implemented a significant new ruling that requires a player to demonstrate a "clear connection" to any country they wish to represent. FIFA has used its authority to overturn results of competitive international matches that feature ineligible players.

No.PositionPlayer
0 Flag of the United States.svg GK Claudia Dickey
1 Flag of the United States.svg FW Madison Schultz
3 Flag of the United States.svg FW Ru Mucherera
4 Flag of the United States.svg FW Bridgette Andrzejewski
5 Flag of the United States.svg MF Mary Elliot McCabe
6 Flag of the United States.svg FW Taylor Otto
7 Flag of the United States.svg DF Julia Dorsey
8 Flag of the United States.svg MF Brianna Pinto
9 Flag of the United States.svg MF Rachel Dorwart
10 Flag of the United States.svg MF Rachel Jones
11 Flag of the United States.svg MF Emily Fox
12 Flag of the United States.svg FW Alexis Strickland
13 Flag of the United States.svg FW Isabel Cox
14 Flag of the United States.svg MF Morgan Goff
15 Flag of the United States.svg FW Zoe Redei
16 Flag of the United States.svg FW Aleigh Gambone
No.PositionPlayer
17 Flag of the United States.svg GK Marz Josephson
18 Flag of the United States.svg MF Natalie Chandler
19 Flag of England.svg FW Alessia Russo
20 Flag of the United States.svg MF Libby Moore
21 Flag of the United States.svg MF Miah Araba
22 Flag of the United States.svg DF Abby Staker
23 Flag of England.svg DF Lotte Wubben-Moy
25 Flag of the United States.svg DF Maycee Bell
26 Flag of the United States.svg FW Hallie Klanke
27 Flag of the United States.svg DF Lois Joel
28 Flag of the United States.svg MF Maggie Pierce
30 Flag of the United States.svg DF Brooke Bingham
45 Flag of the United States.svg MF Cameron Keating
52 Flag of the United States.svg FW Izzy Brown
99 Flag of the United States.svg MF Laura Sparling

Individual honors

National Coach of the Year:

ACC Coach of the Year:

Mia Hamm won numerous awards with the Tar Haeels Mia Hamm signing an autograph.jpg
Mia Hamm won numerous awards with the Tar Haeels

Hermann Trophy:

Kristine Lilly US-American soccer player

Kristine Marie Lilly Heavey, née Kristine Marie Lilly, is a retired American soccer player who last played professionally for Boston Breakers in Women's Professional Soccer (WPS). She was a member of the United States women's national football team for 23 years and is the most capped football player in the history of the sport gaining her 352nd and final cap against Mexico in a World Cup qualifier in November 2010. Lilly scored 130 goals for the United States women's national team, behind Mia Hamm's 158 goals, and Abby Wambach's 184.

Mia Hamm American association football player

Mariel Margaret Hamm-Garciaparra is an American retired professional soccer player, two-time Olympic gold medalist, and two-time FIFA Women's World Cup champion. Hailed as a soccer icon, she played as a forward for the United States women's national soccer team from 1987–2004. Hamm was the face of the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA), the first professional women's soccer league in the United States, where she played for the Washington Freedom from 2001–2003. She played college soccer for the North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team and helped the team win four consecutive NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship titles.

Tisha Venturini American soccer player

Tisha Venturini-Hoch is a former American soccer player and current National Spokesperson for Produce for Better Health. She is a gold medalist in 1996 Atlanta Olympics, and a world champion in 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup held in the U.S.

ACC Player of the Year:

ACC Defensive Player of the Year:

Yael Averbuch, ACC Defensive Player of the Year in 2006 Yael Averbuch with flag.jpg
Yael Averbuch, ACC Defensive Player of the Year in 2006

ACC Offensive Player of the Year:

ACC Rookie of the Year:

NCAA Tournament MVP:

Offensive Player of the NCAA Tournament:

Defensive Player of the Tournament:

First Team All-America Selection: As of 2011, North Carolina had 70 players gain first-team All-American recognition. The next two schools with the greatest number of All-Americans were tied with twenty-two each. [7]

Notable Alumnae

Tisha Venturini

Mia Hamm

Kristine Lilly

Heather O'Reilly

Meghan Klingenberg

Lori Chalupny

Whitney Engen

Lucy Bronze

Katie Bowen

Tobin Heath

Crystal Dunn

Ashlyn Harris

Allie Long

Jessica McDonald

Related Research Articles

College soccer form of soccer

College soccer is played by teams composed of soccer players who are enrolled in colleges and universities. While it is most widespread in the United States, it is also prominent in South Korea and Canada. The institutions typically hire full-time professional coaches and staff, although the student athletes are strictly amateur and are not paid. College soccer in the United States is sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the sports regulatory body for major universities, and by the governing bodies for smaller universities and colleges. This sport is played on a rectangular field of the dimensions of about 64m (meters) - 70m sideline to sideline (width), and 100m - 110m goal line to goal line (length).

Cynthia "Cindy" Marie Parlow Cone, née Cynthia Parlow, is the former head coach for Portland Thorns FC in the National Women's Soccer League, and a retired American professional soccer player, two-time Olympic Gold medalist, and 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup champion. In May 2018, the National Soccer Hall of Fame announced Parlow will be inducted into the Hall.

Fetzer Field

Robert Fetzer Field was a sports field located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and was the home of the lacrosse and soccer teams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina Tar Heels. The four teams that called Fetzer field their home have a combined total of 26 national championships. The stadium was demolished in 2017 to make way for the Soccer/Lacrosse Stadium that was built on the same site.

North Carolina Tar Heels intercollegiate sports teams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The North Carolina Tar Heels are the athletic teams representing the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The name Tar Heel is a nickname used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. The campus at Chapel Hill is referred to as the University of North Carolina for the purposes of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered in 1789, and in 1795 it became the first state-supported university in the United States. Since the school fostered the oldest collegiate team in the Carolinas, the school took on the nickname ""Carolina", especially in athletics. The Tar Heels are also referred to as North Carolina, UNC, or The Heels. The female athletic teams are sometimes referred to as Lady Tar Heels.

North Carolina Tar Heels mens basketball

The North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball program is the intercollegiate men's basketball team of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Tar Heels have won seven NCAA men's college national championships. North Carolina's six NCAA Tournament Championships are third-most all-time, behind University of California, Los Angeles(11) and University of Kentucky(8). They have also won 18 Atlantic Coast Conference tournament titles, 32 Atlantic Coast Conference regular season titles, and an Atlantic Coast Conference record 20 outright Regular Season Championships. The program has produced many notable players who went on to play in the NBA, including three of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History: Billy Cunningham, Michael Jordan and James Worthy. Many Tar Heel assistant coaches have gone on to become head coaches elsewhere.

Elmar Bolowich is the head coach of the Creighton Bluejays men's soccer team at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He began at Creighton University after leaving his 22-year tenure as the head coach of the North Carolina Tar Heels men's soccer team at the University of North Carolina.

North Carolina Tar Heels mens soccer

The North Carolina Tar Heels men's soccer team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in men's NCAA Division I soccer competition. They compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The Tar Heels won the NCAA championship in 2001 and 2011.

Danielle Egan Reyna is a retired American soccer player. Egan played six times for the United States women's national soccer team in 1993. She married soccer player Claudio Reyna in 1997.

Linda Hamilton (soccer) American soccer player

Linda A. Hamilton is an American retired soccer defender and former member of the United States women's national soccer team. She is currently head coach of the women's soccer team at the Southwestern University. Hamilton was inducted into the Georgia Soccer Hall of Fame in 2001.

Debbie Keller association football player

Deborah "Debbie" Kim Keller is an American retired soccer forward and former member of the United States women's national soccer team.

The 1989 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the eighth annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The championship game was played again at Method Road Soccer Stadium in Raleigh, North Carolina during December 1989.

The 1991 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 10th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The championship game was played at Fetzer Field in Chapel Hill, North Carolina during December 1991.

The 1992 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 11th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The championship game was played at Fetzer Field in Chapel Hill, North Carolina during December 1992.

The 1993 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 12th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The championship game was played at Fetzer Field in Chapel Hill, North Carolina during December 1993.

The 1994 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 13th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at Merlo Field in Portland, Oregon during December 1994.

The 1996 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 15th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at Buck Shaw Stadium in Santa Clara, California during December 1996.

The 1997 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 16th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at the UNCG Soccer Stadium in Greensboro, North Carolina during December 1997.

The 2017 ACC Women's Soccer Tournament was the postseason women's soccer tournament for the Atlantic Coast Conference. The defending champions were the Florida State Seminoles, but they were eliminated from the 2017 tournament with a 2–1 quarterfinal loss at North Carolina. North Carolina won the tournament with a 1–0 win over Duke in the final. The title was the 21st for the North Carolina women's soccer program, all of which have come under the direction of head coach Anson Dorrance.

References

  1. "Carolina Athletics Brand Identity Guidelines" (PDF). April 21, 2015. Retrieved July 20, 2017.
  2. "2009 North Carolina Women's Soccer Media Guide." "tarheelblue.com." Retrieved on May 20, 2010.
  3. "2007 North Carolina Women's Soccer Media Guide." tarheelblue.com. Retrieved on March 23, 2009.
  4. EXPLAINING VARIATION IN THE SEX COMPOSITION OF COACHES FOR WOMEN’S INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC TEAMS [ permanent dead link ]
  5. Interview with Anson Dorrance, June 11, 1991
  6. "2019 Women's Soccer Roster". goheels.com. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Athletics. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  7. "Official 2012 NCAA Men's and Women's Soccer Records Book." ncaa.org. Retrieved on March 23, 2008.