Postal codes in Croatia

Last updated
Postal code scheme in Croatia is based on the country's subdivision into counties. Zagreb City and Zagreb County share the 10xxx range. Counties of Croatia.svg
Postal code scheme in Croatia is based on the country's subdivision into counties. Zagreb City and Zagreb County share the 10xxx range.

Postal codes in Croatia are 5 digit numeric. There are 20 two digit zones defined. Zagreb City and Zagreb County have one, each other first level administrative country subdivision, i.e. one of the counties of Croatia, has its own range.

Postal code series of letters and digits for sorting mail

A postal code is a series of letters or digits or both, sometimes including spaces or punctuation, included in a postal address for the purpose of sorting mail.

Croatia Republic in Central Europe

Croatia, officially the Republic of Croatia, is a country at the crossroads of Central and Southeast Europe, on the Adriatic Sea. It borders Slovenia to the northwest, Hungary to the northeast, Serbia to the east, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Montenegro to the southeast, sharing a maritime border with Italy. Its capital, Zagreb, forms one of the country's primary subdivisions, along with twenty counties. Croatia has an area of 56,594 square kilometres and a population of 4.28 million, most of whom are Roman Catholics.

Counties of Croatia regional administrative division of Croatia

The counties of Croatia are the primary administrative subdivisions of the Republic of Croatia. Since they were re-established in 1992, Croatia has been divided into 20 counties and the capital city of Zagreb, which has the authority and legal status of both a county and a city. As of 2015, the counties are subdivided into 128 cities and 428 municipalities.

Contents

From the 10 possible 1 digit ranges only 5 are assigned:

In the range 1xxxx only one two digit range namely 10xxx is assigned, the maximum of subranges exists is in the 4xxxx range with 7 ranges.

Range Location
10xxx City of Zagreb and Zagreb County
20xxx Dubrovnik-Neretva County
21xxx Split-Dalmatia County
22xxx Šibenik-Knin County
23xxx Zadar County
31xxx Osijek-Baranja County
32xxx Vukovar-Srijem County
33xxx Virovitica-Podravina County
34xxx Požega-Slavonia County
35xxx Brod-Posavina County
40xxx Međimurje County
42xxx Varaždin County
43xxx Bjelovar-Bilogora County
44xxx Sisak-Moslavina County
47xxx Karlovac County
48xxx Koprivnica-Križevci County
49xxx Krapina-Zagorje County
51xxx Primorje-Gorski Kotar County
52xxx Istria County
53xxx Lika-Senj County
2-digit postcode areas Croatia (defined through the first two postcode digits) 2 digit postcode croatia.png
2-digit postcode areas Croatia (defined through the first two postcode digits)

Three cities have a postal code with 4 zeros: 10000 Zagreb, 20000 Dubrovnik, 40000 Čakovec.

Zagreb Capital and largest city of Croatia

Zagreb is the capital and the largest city of Croatia. It is located in the northwest of the country, along the Sava river, at the southern slopes of the Medvednica mountain. Zagreb lies at an elevation of approximately 122 m (400 ft) above sea level. The estimated population of the city in 2018 is 810,003. The population of the Zagreb urban agglomeration is about 1.2 million, approximately a quarter of the total population of Croatia.

Dubrovnik City in Dubrovnik-Neretva, Croatia

Dubrovnik is a Croatian city on the Adriatic Sea. It is one of the most prominent tourist destinations in the Mediterranean Sea, a seaport and the centre of Dubrovnik-Neretva County. Its total population is 42,615. In 1979, the city of Dubrovnik joined the UNESCO list of World Heritage sites.

Čakovec City in Međimurje, Croatia

Čakovec is a city in northern Croatia, located around 90 kilometres north of Zagreb, the Croatian capital. Čakovec is both the county seat and the largest city of Međimurje County, the northernmost, smallest and most densely populated Croatian county.

Range City County
10000 Zagreb Zagreb County
20000 Dubrovnik Dubrovnik–Neretva County
21000 Split Split-Dalmatia County
22000 Šibenik Šibenik-Knin County
23000 Zadar Zadar County
31000 Osijek Osijek-Baranja County
32000 Vukovar Vukovar-Syrmia County
33000 Virovitica Virovitica–Podravina County
34000 Požega Požega-Slavonia County
35000 Slavonski Brod Brod–Posavina County
40000 Čakovec Međimurje County
42000 Varaždin Varaždin County
43000 Bjelovar Bjelovar–Bilogora County
44000 Sisak Sisak–Moslavina County
47000 Karlovac Karlovac County
48000 Koprivnica Koprivnica-Križevci County
49000 Krapina Krapina-Zagorje County
51000 Rijeka Primorje-Gorski Kotar County
52000 Pazin Istria County
53000 Gospić Lika-Senj County

Old system

After independence, Croatia went on to use the 5 digit numeric postal codes once assigned to the Socialist Republic of Croatia (within SFR Yugoslavia). The system had assigned the ranges 4xxxx and 5xxxx to the republic.

Socialist Republic of Croatia federated state of Yugoslavia 1943 and 1991

The Socialist Republic of Croatia was a constituent republic and federated state of Yugoslavia. By its constitution, modern-day Croatia is its direct continuation. Along with five other Yugoslav republics, it was formed during World War II and became a socialist republic after the war. It had four full official names during its 48-year existence. By territory and population, it was the second largest republic in Yugoslavia, after the Socialist Republic of Serbia.

See also

ISO 3166-2:HR is the entry for Croatia in ISO 3166-2, part of the ISO 3166 standard published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), which defines codes for the names of the principal subdivisions of all countries coded in ISO 3166-1.

Telephone numbers in Croatia Wikimedia portal

This is an alphabetical list by town of phone dialing codes in Croatia. The country calling code for Croatia is +385. Croatia received a new country code following the breakup of the SFR Yugoslavia in 1991.

Related Research Articles

North American Numbering Plan integrated telephone numbering plan serving 20 North American countries which share its resources

The North American Numbering Plan (NANP) is a telephone numbering plan that encompasses twenty-five distinct regions in twenty countries primarily in North America, including the Caribbean. Some North American countries, most notably Mexico, do not participate in the NANP.

A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints. Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber.

Telephone numbers in the United Kingdom Wikimedia list article

Telephone numbers in the United Kingdom are administered by the UK government's Office of Communications (Ofcom). For this purpose Ofcom established a telephone numbering plan, known as the National Telephone Numbering Plan, which is the system for assigning telephone numbers to subscriber stations.

Telephone numbers in Australia telephone numbering plan of Australia

The Australian telephone numbering plan describes the allocation of phone numbers in Australia. It has changed many times, the most recent major reorganisation by the Australian Communications and Media Authority taking place between 1994 and 1998.

The Big Number Change addressed various issues with the telephone dialing plan in the United Kingdom, during the late-1990s and early-2000s.

Telephone numbers in Singapore

Telephone numbers in Singapore, also known as the National Numbering Plan, are regulated by the Info-communications Media Development Authority (IMDA). Due to the small geographical size of Singapore, there are no area or trunk codes; all numbers belong to one numbering area, and thus come in the same 8-digit format. Numbers are categorised based on the first digit, thus providing ten possible categories, of which six are currently in use and the remaining four reserved for future usage.

Four-digit postal codes were first introduced in Romania in 1974. Beginning with 1 May 2003, postal codes have six digits, and represent addresses to the street level in major cities. The digits represent the postal area; the county; the city/commune; the last three, depending on the size of the city/commune, represent the commune/city, the street, or the house/building.

Telephone numbers in Malaysia

Telephone numbers in Malaysia are regulated by the Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC).

Former Australian dialling codes

The format of telephone numbers in Australia has changed over time to allow for the expansion of the subscriber base as technology has improved.

Telephone numbers in Luxembourg employ a closed dialling system, whereby all numbers are dialed in the same format whether from within Luxembourg or from abroad. There is no trunk like "0".

Telephone numbers in Israel

Telephone numbers in Israel consist of an area code and a subscriber number. The dial plan type in Israel is closed, and "0" is the internal Trunk prefix in Israel. Israel's country calling code is +972.

Telephone numbers in Germany Wikimedia list article

The regulation of telephone numbers in Germany is the responsibility of the Federal Network Agency of the German government. The agency has a mandate to telecommunications in Germany and other infrastructure systems.

The national conventions for writing telephone numbers vary by country. While international standards exist in the form of the International Telecommunication Union sector ITU-T issued recommendation E.123, national telephone numbering plans define the format and length of telephone numbers assigned to telephones.

0114

0114 is the national dialling code for Sheffield in the United Kingdom. The area it serves includes almost all of the City of Sheffield and some adjacent areas. When STD codes were first introduced, Sheffield was assigned the mnemonic 0SH2, later changing to the corresponding numbers upon the introduction of All-Figure Dialling in the area. Instead of the expected 01742 code, Sheffield's area code changed to the current 0114 code on 16 April 1995, along with 4 other cities in England, as part of PhONEday. All subscriber numbers within the area code consist of seven digits. The code is used at several telephone exchanges as part of a linked numbering scheme. In common with all other British area codes the initial '0' is a trunk prefix that is not required when dialling Sheffield from abroad.

Ranges for fictitious telephone numbers are common in most telephone numbering plans. One of the main reasons these ranges exist is to avoid accidentally using real phone numbers in movies and television programmes because viewers frequently call the numbers used. In North America, the area served by the North American Numbering Plan (NANPA) system of area codes, fictitious telephone numbers are usually of the form (XXX) 555-xxxx. The use of 555 numbers in fiction, however, led a desire to assign some of them in the real world, and some of them are no longer suitable for use in fiction. Other areas have different fictitious telephone numbers.

C├│digo de Endere├žamento Postal

Código de Endereçamento Postal is the Brazilian postal code system commonly known as CEP. Introduced in 1972 as a sequence of five digits, it was expanded to eight digits in 1992 to allow for more precise localization. The standard format is "nnnnn-nnn".

Telephone numbers in the Soviet Union

The telephone numbering plan of the USSR was a set of telephone area codes, numbers and dialing rules, which operated in the Soviet Union until the 1990s. After the collapse of the USSR, many newly independent republics implemented their own numbering plans. However, many of the principles of the Soviet numbering plan still remain. The former Soviet international code +7 is still retained by Russia and Kazakhstan.