Rosette (award)

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A rosette is an award made from ribbon and presented to mark an achievement. Such ribbons usually have a pin, brooch or bridle clip as a fastener with which the award can be attached to clothing, animals, walls, or other surfaces.

Ribbon Long, narrow woven textile, used for trimming, belts, filets, and straps of various kinds

A ribbon or riband is a thin band of material, typically cloth but also plastic or sometimes metal, used primarily as decorative binding and tying. Cloth ribbons are made of natural materials such as silk, cotton, and jute and of synthetic materials, such as polyester, nylon, and polypropylene. Ribbon is used for innumerable useful, ornamental, and symbolic purposes. Cultures around the world use ribbon in their hair, around the body, and as ornamentation on non-human animals, buildings, and packaging. Some popular fabrics used to make ribbons are satin, organza, sheer, silk, velvet, and grosgrain.

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Wedding Rosettes mark the special event for the bride and groom or the guests of the bride and groom White wedding rosette 3Tiers.jpg
Wedding Rosettes mark the special event for the bride and groom or the guests of the bride and groom
Daffodil Flower Rosettes suitable for many occasions as a gift or an award Daffodil rosette.jpg
Daffodil Flower Rosettes suitable for many occasions as a gift or an award

Award ribbons can be simply a flat piece of ribbon, a flat-folded ribbon, or fancier manipulations of the ribbon material, such as rosettes. A rosette consists of ribbon that is pleated or gathered and arranged in a circle so that it resembles a rose, usually with streamer ribbons attached. Some ribbon rosettes will also have loops, petals and star points as part of the design whilst using Satin ribbons, Velvet ribbons, Sheer ribbons, Lamé ribbons, Tartan ribbons and printed ribbons including personalised printed ribbons to promote the sponsor, event or the reason for giving.

Pleat deliberate fold in the design of a textile object or garment

A pleat is a type of fold formed by doubling fabric back upon itself and securing it in place. It is commonly used in clothing and upholstery to gather a wide piece of fabric to a narrower circumference.

Gather (sewing)

Gathering is a sewing technique for shortening the length of a strip of fabric so that the longer piece can be attached to a shorter piece. It is commonly used in clothing to manage fullness, as when a full sleeve is attached to the armscye or cuff of a shirt, or when a skirt is attached to a bodice.

Rose Genus of plants

A rose is a woody perennial flowering plant of the genus Rosa, in the family Rosaceae, or the flower it bears. There are over three hundred species and thousands of cultivars. They form a group of plants that can be erect shrubs, climbing, or trailing, with stems that are often armed with sharp prickles. Flowers vary in size and shape and are usually large and showy, in colours ranging from white through yellows and reds. Most species are native to Asia, with smaller numbers native to Europe, North America, and northwestern Africa. Species, cultivars and hybrids are all widely grown for their beauty and often are fragrant. Roses have acquired cultural significance in many societies. Rose plants range in size from compact, miniature roses, to climbers that can reach seven meters in height. Different species hybridize easily, and this has been used in the development of the wide range of garden roses.

Ribbons are usually imprinted with information about the award, such as the name of the event, the sponsoring organization, the placement (such as first place, second place, etc.), and the date. More sophisticated awards also include the name of the recipient, special motifs and logos.

Ribbon rosette awards come in many sizes from 1 Tier (1 layer) up to super sized rosettes of (as standard) 20 Tiers. They can be glued together or sewn, however the centre disks always need to be stuck on with glue.

A ribbon rosette is made up with card backing disks to attach the pleated ribbon onto thus make the tiers of the rosette. Star points, petals and loops can be added, then chosen fastener, then tails and then the centre disk.

Rosettes can be used for awards for shows and events for all types: businesses, sports, hobbies and animals:- horses, dogs, cats, cattle, birds and ferrets, horticulture, business achievements, education as well as all disciplines of sports.

Celebration Rosettes are given to mark Birthdays, Valentine's Day, Christmas, Easter, Halloween or other special occasions like Weddings, Christenings and even Funerals. They can also come with a ribbon attachment allowing the rosettes to be hung up to display both sides, as some rosettes are produced back to back, creating two sides.

Rosettes are also produced in different shapes other than a circle, like ovals, squares, diamonds, rectangles and hearts.

Ribbon awards also come in different varieties like, medals, sashes and banners all of which can be personalised at many bespoke and wholesale companies from around the world.

Flower rosettes seem to be new to the market since 2012, where particular flowers are stylised into a rosette. Flower rosettes so far include Daffodil Rosettes, Carnation Rosettes and Rose Rosettes all of which can be used as a gift or an award, as a single Flower Rosette or as a bunch of Flower Rosettes depending on the occasion as its use.

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Asteraceae Family of plants

Asteraceae or Compositae, is a very large and widespread family of flowering plants (Angiospermae).

Pressed flower craft

Pressed flower craft consists of drying flower petals and leaves in a flower press to flatten and exclude light and moisture. Pressing flowers makes them appear flat, and there is often a change in color, ranging from faded colors to a greater intensity of vibrant colors. It has long been practiced as an art form in China and in Japan, where it is known as oshibana (押し花). Outside of Asia, the art gained popularity in England during the Victorian era and has experienced a revival in the last 30 years or so. It is currently used in Australia and in the United States by some recognized artists, including Cellestine Hannemann and Janie Gross,.

Woodworking joints part of woodworking that involves joining together pieces of timber

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Skirt garment of varying length extending from the waist or hip and covering a part of the lower body. Also, the lower part of a dress, coat, or other garment

A skirt is the lower part of a dress or gown, covering the person from the waist downwards, or a separate outer garment serving this purpose.

Staple (fastener) connecting element and a part of the office supply

A staple is a type of two-pronged fastener, usually metal, used for joining or binding materials together. Large staples might be used with a hammer or staple gun for masonry, roofing, corrugated boxes and other heavy-duty uses. Smaller staples are used with a stapler to attach pieces of paper together; such staples are a more permanent and durable fastener for paper documents than the paper clip.

Medal round piece of metal, often used as an award

A medal or medallion is a small portable artistic object, a thin disc, normally of metal, carrying a design, usually on both sides. They typically have a commemorative purpose of some kind, and many are given as awards. They may be intended to be worn, suspended from clothing or jewellery in some way. They may be struck like a coin by dies or die-cast in a mould.

Fastener hardware device that mechanically joins or affixes two or more objects together and used to create non-permanent joints

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Curtain cloth used to block out light

A curtain is a piece of cloth intended to block or obscure light, or drafts, or water. A curtain is also the movable screen or drape in a theater that separates the stage from the auditorium or that serves as a backdrop.

Strap Strip of flexible material, especially leather, used for fastening or holding things together

A strap, sometimes also called strop, is an elongated flap or ribbon, usually of fabric or leather.

A rosette is a small, circular device that is typically presented with a medal. The rosettes are either worn on the medal to denote a higher rank, or for situations where wearing the medal is deemed inappropriate, such as on a suit. Rosettes are issued in nations such as Belgium, France, Italy and Japan. Rosettes are also sometimes called bowknots, due to their shape. Moreover, a large rosette is sometimes pinned onto the ribbon which suspends a medal, typically the Officer 's badge of certain orders of chivalry.

A service ribbon, medal ribbon, or ribbon bar is a small ribbon, mounted on a small metal bar equipped with an attaching device, which is generally issued for wear in place of a medal when it is not appropriate to wear the actual medal. Each country's government has its own rules on what ribbons can be worn in what circumstances and in which order. This is usually defined in an official document and is called "the order of precedence" or "the order of wearing." In some countries, some awards are "ribbon only," having no associated medal.

Rosette (botany) circular arrangement of leaves or of structures resembling leaves

In botany, a rosette is a circular arrangement of leaves or of structures resembling leaves.

Butt joint technique in which two pieces of wood are joined

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1840s in Western fashion costume and fashion of the 1840s

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Novelty yarns any yarn with special effects introduced in spinning or plying

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This page provides a glossary of plant morphology. Botanists and other biologists who study plant morphology use a number of different terms to classify and identify plant organs and parts that can be observed using no more than a handheld magnifying lens. This page provides help in understanding the numerous other pages describing plants by their various taxa. The accompanying page—Plant morphology—provides an overview of the science of the external form of plants. There is also an alphabetical list: Glossary of botanical terms. In contrast, this page deals with botanical terms in a systematic manner, with some illustrations, and organized by plant anatomy and function in plant physiology.

Clothing in ancient Greece

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<i>Pinguicula lutea</i> species of plant

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Hook-and-loop fastener system quick opening and closing

Hook-and-loop fasteners, hook-and-pile fasteners or touch fasteners consist of two components: typically, two lineal fabric strips which are attached to the opposing surfaces to be fastened. The first component features tiny hooks, the second features smaller loops. When the two are pressed together the hooks catch in the loops and the two pieces fasten or bind temporarily. When separated, by pulling or peeling the two surfaces apart, the strips make a distinctive "ripping" sound.

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