Tie clip

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A selection of tie clips, mostly from the early to mid 20th century Tie clips wiki.jpg
A selection of tie clips, mostly from the early to mid 20th century

A tie clip (also tie slide, tie bar, or tie clasp) [1] is a clothing accessory that is used to clip a tie to the underlying shirt front, preventing it from swinging and ensuring that the tie hangs straight, resulting in a neat, uniform appearance.

Fashion accessory item which is used to contribute to the wearers outfit

A fashion accessory is an item used to contribute, in a secondary manner, to the wearer's outfit, often used to complete an outfit and chosen to specifically complement the wearer's look. It has the capacity to further express an individuals identity and personality as there are accessories that come in different, shapes, sizes, hues etc. The term came into use in the 20th century.

Necktie clothing item, traditionally worn by boys and men with dress shirt

A necktie, or simply a tie, is a long piece of cloth, worn usually by men, for decorative purposes around the neck, resting under the shirt collar and knotted at the throat.

Shirt garment for the upper body

A shirt is a cloth garment for the upper body.

Contents

Tie clips are commonly made of metal and often have decorative patterns or embellishments. Some clips have a small badge indicating membership to a club or some other affiliation, or some other commemorative token, in a similar manner to the way in which ties themselves may be used as signs of membership. The use of tie clips gained prominence during the 1920s, during which period the use of straight ties made of delicate materials such as silk became more fashionable, and they largely came to replace the more traditional tie pin. [1]

Tie pin neckwear-controlling device

A tie pin is a neckwear-controlling device, originally worn by wealthy English gentlemen to secure the folds of their cravats. They were first popularized at the beginning of the 19th century. Cravats were made of silk, satin, lace and lightly starched cambric, lawn and muslin, and stickpins were necessary accoutrements to keep these expensive fabrics in place and safe. Stickpins commonly used pearls and other precious gemstones set in gold or other precious metals and were designed specifically for their owners.

In the United States, a tie clip is one of the few items of jewelry allowed to be worn by servicemen and women. [2]

See also

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Breadboard

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Bolt action type of firearm action

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Cummerbund broad waist sash, usually pleated, which is often worn with single-breasted dinner jackets or tuxedos

A cummerbund is a broad waist sash, usually pleated, which is often worn with single-breasted dinner jackets. The cummerbund originated in ancient Persia, and was adopted by British military officers in colonial India, where they saw it worn by Indian men. It was adopted as an alternative to a waistcoat, and later spread to civilian use. The modern use of the cummerbund to Europeans is as a component of a traditional black tie event.

Badge accessory with insignia indicating membership, rank or accomplishment

A badge is a device or accessory, often containing the insignia of an organization, which is presented or displayed to indicate some feat of service, a special accomplishment, a symbol of authority granted by taking an oath, a sign of legitimate employment or student status, or as a simple means of identification. They are also used in advertising, publicity, and for branding purposes. Police badges date back to medieval times when knights wore a coat of arms representing their allegiances and loyalty.

Gorget linen or metal worn around the neck, either for defensive purposes or as a decorative element (especially of a military uniform)

A gorget, from the French gorge meaning throat, was a band of linen wrapped around a woman's neck and head in the medieval period or the lower part of a simple chaperon hood. The term later described a steel or leather collar to protect the throat, a set of pieces of plate armour,or a single piece of plate armour hanging from the neck and covering the throat and chest. Later, particularly from the 18th century, the gorget became primarily ornamental, serving as a symbolic accessory on military uniforms, a use which has survived in some armies.

Cufflink jewelry used to secure the cuffs of dress shirts

Cufflinks are items of jewelry that are used to secure the cuffs of dress shirts. Cufflinks can be manufactured from a variety of different materials, such as glass, stone, leather, metal, precious metal or combinations of these. Securing of the cufflinks is usually achieved via toggles or reverses based on the design of the front section, which can be folded into position. There are also variants with chains or a rigid, bent rear section. The front sections of the cufflinks can be decorated with gemstones, inlays, inset material or enamel and designed in two or three-dimensional form.

Army Combat Uniform battle uniforms worn by the United States Army beginning in 2004

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Ascot tie neckband with wide pointed wings

An ascot tie, or ascot or hanker-tie, is a neckband with wide pointed wings, traditionally made of pale grey patterned silk. This wide tie is usually patterned, folded over, and fastened with a tie pin or tie clip. It is usually reserved for formal wear with morning dress for daytime weddings and worn with a cutaway morning coat and striped grey formal trousers. This type of dress cravat is made of a thicker, woven type of silk similar to a modern tie and is traditionally either grey or black.

Hot shoe mounting point on the top of a camera

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The United States Army in World War II used a variety of standard and non-standard dress and battle uniforms, which often changed depending upon the theater of war, climatic environment, and supply exigencies.

Kilt pin decorative pin worn on the apron of a kilt

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Uniforms of the United States Marine Corps

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Hairstyling tools may include hair irons, hair dryers, hairbrushes, hair rollers, diffusers and various types of scissors.

R-clip

An R-clip, also known as an R-pin, R-key, hairpin cotter pin, hairpin cotter, bridge pin, hitch pin or spring cotter pin, is a fastener made of a springy material, commonly hardened metal wire, resembling the shape of the letter "R".

Master link

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References

  1. 1 2 Devlin, Paul (2007-05-29). "Here Lies the Tie Clip: An elegy for a great accessory". Slate.
  2. U.S., Army Regulations (2012-07-23). "Military Uniform". Army.

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Further reading