Scotland women's national cricket team

Last updated

Scotland
Flag of Scotland.svg
Flag of Scotland
Nickname(s)Wildcats
Association Cricket Scotland
Personnel
Captain Kathryn Bryce
Coach Steven Knox [1]
International Cricket Council
ICC statusAssociate member (1994)
ICC region Europe
ICC RankingsCurrent [2] Best-ever
WT20I 11th 11th
Women's One Day Internationals
First WODIv Flag of England.svg  England at Bradfield College, Bradfield; 10 August 2001
Last WODIv Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland at VRA Cricket Ground, Amstelveen; 26 July 2003
WODIsPlayedWon/Lost
Total [3] 8 1/7
(0 ties, 0 no result)
Women's World Cup Qualifier appearances4 (first in 2003 )
Best resultChampions (2003)
Women's Twenty20 Internationals
First WT20Iv Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda at VRA Cricket Ground, Amstelveen; 7 July 2018
Last WT20Iv Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea at Sportpark Maarschalkerweerd, Utrecht; 14 July 2018
WT20IsPlayedWon/Lost
Total [4] 5 3/2
(0 ties, 0 no result)
This year [5] 0 0/0
(0 ties, 0 no result)
Women's World Twenty20 Qualifier appearances2 (first in 2015 )
Best result3rd (2018)
As of 3 Feb 2019

The Scotland women's national cricket team, nicknamed the Wildcats, represents Scotland in international women's cricket. The team is organised by Cricket Scotland, an associate member of the International Cricket Council (ICC).

Scotland country in Northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

Womens cricket cricket when played by girls/women

Women's cricket is the form of the team sport of cricket that is played by women. The first recorded match was in England on 26 July 1745.

Cricket Scotland

Cricket Scotland, formerly known as the Scottish Cricket Union, is the governing body of the sport of cricket in Scotland. The body is based at the National Cricket Academy, Edinburgh.

Contents

Scotland were involved in the first international women's cricket match, when they played against England in August 1932. The team played sporadically throughout the remainder of the 20th century, with regular competition beginning only in 2000. Scotland's first international tournament was the 2001 European Championship, where matches held One Day International (ODI) status. The team's only other ODI appearances to date came at the 2003 IWCC Trophy in the Netherlands, a qualifier for the 2005 World Cup. Outside regional tournaments, Scotland has only qualified for two major events since then – the 2008 World Cup Qualifier and the 2015 World Twenty20 Qualifier.

England womens cricket team This team represents England and Wales in international cricket

The England women's cricket team represents England in international women's cricket. The team is administrated by England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB); they played their first Tests in 1934–35, when they beat Australia 2–0 in a three-Test series. Their current captain is Heather Knight, and their current coach is Mark Robinson. There is also an England Women's Academy team, consisting of players just below the full England squad.

The 2001 Women's European Cricket Championship was an international cricket tournament held in England from 10 to 12 August 2001. It was the sixth edition of the Women's European Championship, and, for the final time, all matches at the tournament held One Day International (ODI) status.

The 2003 IWCC Trophy was an international women's cricket tournament held in the Netherlands between 21 and 26 July 2003. Organised by the International Women's Cricket Council (IWCC), it was the inaugural edition of what is now the World Cup Qualifier.

In April 2018, the ICC granted full Women's Twenty20 International (WT20I) status to all its members. Therefore, all Twenty20 matches played between Scotland women and another international side after 1 July 2018 will be a full WT20I. [6]

Women's Twenty20 International (WT20I) is the shortest form of women's international cricket. A women's Twenty20 International is a 20 overs-per-side cricket match played in a maximum of 150 minutes between two of the top 10 ranked countries of the International Cricket Council (ICC) in terms of women's cricket. The first Twenty20 International match was held in August 2004 between England and New Zealand, six months before the first Twenty20 International match was played between two men's teams. The ICC Women's World Twenty20 was first held in 2009.

Twenty20 form of cricket

Twenty20 cricket, sometimes written Twenty-20, and often abbreviated to T20, is a short form of cricket. At the professional level, it was originally introduced by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in 2003 for the inter-county competition in England and Wales. In a Twenty20 game the two teams have a single innings each, which is restricted to a maximum of 20 overs. Together with first-class and List A cricket, Twenty20 is one of the three current forms of cricket recognised by the International Cricket Council (ICC) as being at the highest international or domestic level. A typical Twenty20 game is completed in about three hours, with each innings lasting around 90 minutes and an official 10 minute break between the innings. This is much shorter than previously-existing forms of the game, and is closer to the timespan of other popular team sports. It was introduced to create a fast-paced form of the game which would be attractive to spectators at the ground and viewers on television.

History

In August 1932, a Scottish women's team played England at New Road, Worcester, in what was the first international women's cricket fixture. Four members of the inaugural Scottish women's side – Betty Snowball, Myrtle Maclagan, Joy Liebert, and Betty Archdale – later played in Test matches for England. [7] After 1932, a Scottish women's team was not raised again until 1979, when a fixture was played against a Junior England team at Malvern College, Worcestershire. [8]

New Road, Worcester

New Road is a cricket ground in the English city of Worcester. It has been the home ground of Worcestershire County Cricket Club since 1896. Since October 2017 the ground has been known for sponsorship purposes as Blackfinch New Road following a five-year sponsorship arrangement with Blackfinch Investments.

Betty Snowball british international playerof cricket, squash and lacrosse

Elizabeth "Betty" Alexandra Snowball was an English sportswoman. She played international cricket in the England women's cricket team, and also played international squash and lacrosse for Scotland. She scored 189 runs in 222 minutes playing against New Zealand at Christchurch in February 1935, the fourth women's Test match to be played, setting a world record for the highest individual innings in women's Test cricket which was not surpassed for over 50 years, until Sandhya Agarwal scored 190 in 1986. It remains the highest Test score by an Englishwoman.

Myrtle Maclagan cricketer

Myrtle Ethel Maclagan MBE was an English cricketer.

Scotland made their international tournament debut at the 2001 edition of the Women's European Championship. They lost all three games, finishing last in the four-team tournament. Two years later, they played in the 2003 IWCC Trophy, the inaugural edition of what is now known simply as the World Cup Qualifier.They finished fifth in the six team tournament, which was hosted by the Netherlands, with their only win coming against Japan.

The Women's European Cricket Championship is a women's cricket tournament for teams representing European countries. The first edition was contested in 1989.

The ICC Women's Cricket World Cup Qualifier is an international cricket tournament that serves as the final step of the qualification process for the Women's Cricket World Cup.

They again played in the European Championship in 2005, but again went without a win and finished last. In 2007 they will compete in the Women's World Cup qualifier in Ireland playing the hosts as well as Bermuda, The Netherlands, Papua New Guinea, Pakistan, South Africa and an African qualifier. The top two in this tournament will qualify for the World Cup in 2009, whilst the top four will gain Test and ODI status for the following four years.

Ireland Island in north-west Europe, 20th largest in world, politically divided into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the UK)

Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

In 2014, Scotland were promoted to Division 2 of the Women's County Championship after losing only one game throughout the season. [9] The Wildcats are currently preparing for the ICC Women's World Twenty20 Qualifiers to be held in Thailand at the end of 2015. [10]

In April 2018, Kathryn Bryce was named as the captain of the team. [11] In July 2018, Scotland played its first T20 international match against Uganda in 2018 ICC Women's World Twenty20 Qualifier in Netherlands.

Current squad

The Scottish squad for the 2018 ICC Women's World Twenty20 Qualifier is as follows: [12]

The Scottish squad for the 2017 Women's Cricket World Cup Qualifier was as follows: [13]

Tournament history

European Championship

Records

ODI cricket

WT20I cricket

Opponent Matches Won Lost Tied NR %age FirstLast
ICC Full members
Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 101000.0020182018
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 101000.0020182018
ICC Associate members
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 11000100.0020182018
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 11000100.0020182018
Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 11000100.0020182018
Total5320060.0020182018
Statistics are correct as of Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland v Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea at VRA Cricket Ground, Utrecht, July 14, 2018.


See also

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References

  1. "New Women’s Head Coach Steve Knox will be looking forward to seeing the best players in action" – Cricket Scotland. Retrieved April 18, 2016.
  2. "ICC Rankings". icc-cricket.com.
  3. "WODI matches - Team records". ESPNcricinfo.
  4. "WT20I matches - Team records". ESPNcricinfo.
  5. "WT20I matches - 2019 Team records". ESPNcricinfo.
  6. "All T20I matches to get international status". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  7. England Women v Scotland Women, Scotland Women in England 1932 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 26 November 2015.
  8. Other women's matches played by Scotland Women – CricketArchive. Retrieved 26 November 2015.
  9. http://www.scottishwomencric.com/2014/08/09/match-report-wildcats-v-netherlands/
  10. http://www.icc-cricket.com/news/2015/media-releases/88040/icc-announces-schedule-of-icc-womens-world-twenty20-qualifier-2015
  11. "Kathryn Bryce named Scotland Women captain". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  12. "Women's ICC World T20 Squad Announced". Cricket Scotland. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  13. "Scotland Women's squad named for ICC Global Qualifier". Cricket Scotland. Retrieved 20 February 2017.
  14. "Records / Scotland Women / Women's Twenty20 Internationals / Highest totals". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 July 2018.
  15. "Records / Scotland Women / Women's Twenty20 Internationals / Lowest totals". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 July 2018.
  16. "Records / Scotland Women / Women's Twenty20 Internationals / Top Scores". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 July 2018.
  17. "Records / Scotland Women / Women's Twenty20 Internationals / Best Bowling figures". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 July 2018.