Scott Frost

Last updated

Scott Frost
Scott Frost in Black Nebraska Shirt (cropped).jpg
Frost in 2018
Nebraska Cornhuskers
Position: Head coach
Personal information
Born: (1975-01-04) January 4, 1975 (age 46)
Lincoln, Nebraska
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:218 lb (99 kg)
Career information
High school:Wood River (Wood River, Nebraska)
College: Nebraska
NFL Draft: 1998  / Round: 3 / Pick: 67
Career history
As a player:
As a coach:
  • Nebraska (2002)
    Graduate assistant
  • Kansas State (2006)
    Graduate assistant
  • Northern Iowa (2007)
    Linebackers
  • Northern Iowa (2008)
    Co-defensive coordinator/linebackers
  • Oregon (2009–2012)
    Wide receivers
  • Oregon (2013–2015)
    Offensive coordinator/quarterbacks
  • UCF (2016–2017)
    Head coach
  • Nebraska (2018–present)
    Head coach
Career highlights and awards
As player:

As assistant coach:

As head coach:

Career NFL statistics
Tackles:72
Sacks:1.0
Interceptions:1
Head coaching record
Regular season:30–26
Postseason:1–1
Career:31–27
Player stats at PFR

Scott Andrew Frost (born January 4, 1975) is an American football coach and former player who is the head coach of the Nebraska Cornhuskers. Before Nebraska, Frost was the head coach at UCF during the Knights' 13–0, 2017 season.

Contents

Thus far, Frost's tenure at Nebraska been markedly less successful than his tenure at UCF; Frost has become the first Nebraska coach to post losing records in each of his first three seasons since Bill Jennings from 1957 to 1959.

Prior to becoming a coach, Frost played football at the collegiate and professional level. Frost was the starting quarterback for Nebraska's 1997 national championship team. He also spent six years in the National Football League (NFL), playing mostly on special teams.

High school

Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, Frost attended Wood River High School in Wood River, Nebraska from 1989 to 1993. [9] [10] In four years as the team's starting quarterback, he threw for 6,859 yards and 67 touchdowns and rushed for 4,278 yards and 72 touchdowns. [11] He led his team to the state playoffs in his sophomore, junior, and senior seasons. In those three postseason appearances, Frost's teams won five games and twice made it to the state semi-finals. [12] Both of Frost's parents, Larry and Carol Frost, coached his high school football team. [11]

In addition to football, Frost was a standout in track and field, winning a state championship in the shot put. At the state championship meet his senior year, Frost won an all-class gold medal with a throw of 17.92 m (58 ft 9+12 in). [13] His personal best from earlier that year was 18.62 m (61 ft 1 in). [14] [11]

College career

Frost began his collegiate career as a two-year letterman at Stanford in 1993 and 1994 before transferring to Nebraska in 1995. In his two seasons starting for the Huskers, Frost quarterbacked his teams to a 24–2 record, completing 192 of 359 passes for 2,677 yards and 18 touchdowns, including a senior season in which he became the first player for Nebraska [15] and only the tenth player in college football history to both run (1,095) and pass (1,237) for 1,000 yards, also setting school records for rushing touchdowns (19) and yards. He was the 1996 Big 12 Offensive Newcomer of the Year and a 1997 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award finalist. [16]

Frost's senior season featured a now-legendary play called the Flea Kicker. In a game against Missouri, Frost threw a pass that was inadvertently kicked by Shevin Wiggins and caught by Matt Davison for a touchdown. The touchdown sent the game into overtime where Frost sealed No. 1 Nebraska's victory with a rushing touchdown. Frost and Nebraska went on to win a share of the 1997 national championship with a 42–17 Orange Bowl win over Peyton Manning's Tennessee Volunteers. Frost graduated from Nebraska with a B.A. in finance. [16]

Statistics

Career statistics
SeasonGamesStartsRecordPassingRushing
CompAttYardsPctTDIntRatingAttYardsAvgTD
Stanford Cardinal
1993 1104–729622.20027.815634.20
1994 1103–7–1337746442.92589.1381935.12
Nebraska Cornhuskers
1995
Redshirt.svg Redshirted
1996 131311–21042001,44052.0133130.91264383.59
1997 131313–0881591,23755.354126.01761,0956.2219
Career totals482631–16–12274453,14751.02012119.93551,7895.030

Pro football career

Following his collegiate career, Frost was selected in the third round (67th overall) of the 1998 NFL Draft by the New York Jets as a safety. [17] [18] As a rookie in 1998, Frost played in 13 games mostly on special teams, making six tackles and two passes defended. [19] In 1999, Frost played in 14 games with seven tackles. [17] Playing in all 16 games in 2000, Frost made his first career start against the Buffalo Bills on October 29. [20] Frost also got his first career interception against Bills quarterback Rob Johnson on September 17 and first career sack against the Oakland Raiders' Rich Gannon on December 11. [21]

The day after being waived by the Jets, Frost signed with the Cleveland Browns on August 28, 2001. Frost played in 12 games mostly on special teams, making 16 tackles and a fumble recovery. The Browns waived Frost on December 10. [22]

On December 19, 2001, Frost signed with the Green Bay Packers. [22] However, due to injuries, he never appeared in any games for the Packers, and he was waived on December 17, 2002. [17] [23] In his final NFL season, Frost played in four games for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2003. [17]

Coaching career

As a player, Frost was coached by Stanford's Bill Walsh, Nebraska's Tom Osborne, the New York Jets' Bill Parcells and Bill Belichick, and the Buccaneers' Mike Tomlin and Jon Gruden. In December 2002, while on the Packers' injured reserve list, Frost served as a temporary graduate assistant at his alma mater. [24] He was later a graduate assistant at Kansas State in 2006.

Frost took a position at Northern Iowa in 2007 as linebackers coach before being elevated to co-defensive coordinator one year later. His defense finished the 2008 season tied for third in the FCS in takeaways (40) and ninth in scoring defense (17.7 points per game). The 12–3 Panthers also led the Missouri Valley Football Conference in rushing defense (107.1 yards per game) and scoring defense. [25]

Frost joined Oregon's coaching staff as its wide receivers coach on January 26, 2009. Working under head coach Chip Kelly and offensive coordinator Mark Helfrich, Frost was instrumental in instituting a toughness among his receivers that enhanced their ability as downfield blockers, which contributed to the success of the Ducks’ potent running game. During his four seasons as wide receivers coach, the Ducks reached four straight BCS bowls and three of his departed wide receivers have been invited to NFL camps.

After the departure of Kelly, the University of Oregon promoted Helfrich to head coach and Frost was later officially announced as the offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach on January 31, 2013. [26] In 2014, Frost was a finalist for the Broyles Award, given annually to the nation's top assistant coach. That season, his protégé Marcus Mariota won the Heisman Trophy en route to a berth in the National Championship game. In his three seasons as the Ducks' offensive coordinator, Oregon recorded a 33–7 record and finished every year among the nation's top six teams in terms of both scoring offense and total offense.

UCF

Frost in 2017, after coaching UCF to victory over Memphis in the 2017 American Athletic Conference Football Championship Game Scott Frost (37923219195) (cropped).jpg
Frost in 2017, after coaching UCF to victory over Memphis in the 2017 American Athletic Conference Football Championship Game

On December 1, 2015, Frost was hired as the head football coach at the University of Central Florida. [27] Frost replaced long time UCF head coach George O'Leary and interim head coach Danny Barrett, who took over the Knights when O'Leary resigned following an 0–8 start. The Knights went on to finish 0–12 that year. Frost immediately turned UCF around. He won six games in 2016, taking the Knights to the 2016 Cure Bowl, where they lost to Arkansas State. In 2017, the Knights stormed through the regular season, finishing 11–0. They won the American championship game 62–55 in double OT at home against Memphis for their 12th consecutive win. Frost led the Knights into the 2018 Peach Bowl–the school's second-ever appearance in a major bowl. In that game, they defeated 7th ranked Auburn, completing the first undefeated and untied season in school history. [28] Following the game, the school claimed a national championship. [lower-alpha 1]

Nebraska

On December 2, 2017, Frost accepted the head football coach position at his alma mater, the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. [32]

Personal life

Scott is the son of long time high school football coach Larry Frost and former Olympic discus thrower Carol Frost. His brother, Steve Frost, was born on July 4, 1973 and played defensive line and long snapper at Stanford.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
UCF Knights (American Athletic Conference)(2016–2017)
2016 UCF 6–74–43rd (East) L Cure
2017 UCF 13–08–01st (East) W Peach 76
UCF:19–712–4
Nebraska Cornhuskers (Big Ten Conference)(2018–present)
2018 Nebraska 4–83–6T–5th (West)
2019 Nebraska 5–73–6T–5th (West)
2020 Nebraska 3–53–55th (West)
Nebraska:12–209–17
Total:31–27
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. Heim, Mark (August 27, 2018). "NCAA recognizes UCF's national championship in addition to Alabama's". al.
  2. "2017 American Athletic Conference Football Postseason Honors". American Athletic Conference (Press release). November 29, 2017.
  3. USA Today Sports [@usatodaysports] (January 9, 2018). "2017 AFCA FBS Coach of the Year Award Scott Frost, University of Central Florida" (Tweet) via Twitter.
  4. Russo, Ralph D. (December 18, 2017). "College football: Scott Frost named AP Coach of the Year after leading UCF to undefeated season". NCAA.com. Associated Press.
  5. "UCF's Scott Frost wins Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year Award". espn.com. December 14, 2017.
  6. "FCA Honors Former UCF Coach Scott Frost with 2017 Grant Teaff Award". Fellowship of Christian Athletes (Press release). January 9, 2018.
  7. "National Coach of the Year - UCF". UCF Athletics (Press release). December 6, 2017.
  8. Koch, Joshua (January 10, 2018). "Scott Frost wins Paul "Bear" Bryant Coach of Year Award". Miami Sun Herald. Associated Press.
  9. "The Scott Frost timeline: From Wood River, to Orlando and back home". journalstar.com. Lincoln Journal Star. December 2, 2017.
  10. "Packers.com » Team » Players » Scott Frost". April 23, 2003. Archived from the original on April 23, 2003.
  11. 1 2 3 Plumlee, Rick (November 10, 1996). "For Nebraska Qb, Football Means Family". Chicago Tribune.
  12. "NSAA Football Playoffs History – 1975-1996" (PDF). Nebraska School Activities Association.
  13. "All-Time Track and Field Gold Medal Winners". Nebraska School Activities Association.
  14. "Boys Shot Put All-Time Bests". www.angelfire.com.
  15. https://huskers.com/sports/football/roster/scott-frost/13630
  16. 1 2 "Scott Frost #47: College". Green Bay Packers. Archived from the original on October 2, 2002. Retrieved November 2, 2020.
  17. 1 2 3 4 "Scott Frost". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved November 2, 2020.
  18. "Scott Frost". Huskers.com. University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Retrieved November 2, 2020.
  19. "Scott Frost #47: 1998 Season". Green Bay Packers. Archived from the original on October 2, 2002. Retrieved November 2, 2020.
  20. "Scott Frost 2000 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  21. "Scott Frost #47: 2000 Season". Green Bay Packers. Archived from the original on October 2, 2002. Retrieved November 2, 2020.
  22. 1 2 "Scott Frost #47: 2001 Season". Green Bay Packers. Archived from the original on October 2, 2002. Retrieved November 2, 2020.
  23. "Scott Frost". Green Bay Packers. Archived from the original on April 23, 2003.
  24. Gabriel, Parker (December 3, 2017). "Frost coming home to coach Huskers". columbustelegram.com. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  25. "Scott Frost - Pac-12 Blog - ESPN". July 25, 2012. Archived from the original on July 25, 2012.
  26. "Oregon Ducks announce Scott Frost as offensive coordinator". Archived from the original on February 2, 2013.
  27. "Frost a Knight" (Press release). UCF Knights. December 1, 2015. Archived from the original on May 12, 2016.
  28. Romero, Iliana Limón (December 5, 2017). "Scott Frost to coach UCF in Peach Bowl despite Knights' hire of his replacement". Orlando Sentinel.
  29. "2017 Rankings, Week 17". Colley Matrix. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  30. "Football Bowl Subdivision Records" (PDF). NCAA. p. 109. Retrieved January 10, 2018.
  31. Seeley, Andy (January 10, 2018). "Knights Ranked No. 1 - UCF" (Press release). UCF Athletics.
  32. Chavez, Chris (December 2, 2017). "Nebraska hiring Scott Frost as new head coach". Sports Illustrated.

Notes

  1. UCF claims a national championship for the 2017 season, and the team was ranked number 1 by the Colley Matrix, an NCAA-recognized selector of national champions. [29] [30] [31]