Skokomish Indian Tribe

Last updated
Skokomish Indian Tribe
Twined Skokomish basket with overlay design 01.jpg
Skokomish twined basket of red cedar bark, bear grass, cattail leaf, ca. 1890
Total population
796 enrolled members [1]
Regions with significant populations
Flag of the United States.svg  United States (Flag of Washington.svg  Washington)
Languages
English, Twana [2]
Religion
traditional tribal religion
Related ethnic groups
other Twana, Klallam, and Chimakum people [3]

The Skokomish Indian Tribe, [4] formerly known as the Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, [5] and in its own official use the Skokomish Tribal Nation, [6] is a federally recognized tribe of Skokomish, Twana, Klallam, and Chimakum people. [3] They are a tribe of Southern Coast Salish indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest located in Washington. [7] The Skokomish are one of nine bands of Twana people. [1]

Contents

Reservation

The Skokomish Reservation is located on several square miles of Mason County, just north of Shelton, Washington at 47°20′05″N123°09′36″W / 47.33472°N 123.16000°W / 47.33472; -123.16000 (Skokomish Reservation) . [8] [1] Some Klallam people were relocated onto the reservation after signing the 1855 Point No Point Treaty.

Government

Lucky Dog Casino, Skokomish, Washington Sokomish Casino Lucky Dog.JPG
Lucky Dog Casino, Skokomish, Washington

The Skokomish Indian Tribe is headquartered in Skokomish, Washington. The tribe is governed by a seven-member, democratically elected General Council. The current tribal administration is as follows:

Language

English is commonly spoken by the tribe. The Skokomish language is a dialect of Twana, a Central Salish language. The last fully fluent speaker died in 1980. [2]

Economic development

As of April 2015, the Skokomish Tribe acquired the Glen Ayr resort, located north of Hoodsport, WA, along the Hood Canal. [10]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 "Skokomish Tribe." Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board. Retrieved 26 Sept 2013.
  2. 1 2 "Twana." Ethnologue. Retrieved 26 Sept 2013.
  3. 1 2 Pritzker 200
  4. INDIAN ENTITIES RECOGNIZED AND ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE SERVICES FROM THE UNITED STATES BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS Archived 2017-02-25 at the Wayback Machine : Federal Register, Volume 79, Number 19: 5. 29 January 2014. Accessed 10 June 2014.
  5. "CORPORATE CHARTER of the SKOKOMISH INDIAN TRIBE OF THE SKOKOMISH INDIAN RESERVATION WASHINGTON." 18 June 1984.
  6. Skokomish Tribal Nation website
  7. Pritzker 203
  8. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Skokomish Indian Tribe
  9. "Tribal Council Members." Archived 2008-04-23 at the Wayback Machine Skokomish Tribal Nation. Retrieved 26 Sept 2013.
  10. "Angel of the Winds Casino." 500 Nations. Retrieved 26 Sept 2013.

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References

Coordinates: 47°20′06″N123°09′36″W / 47.334866°N 123.159929°W / 47.334866; -123.159929