Solomon Islands national rugby union team

Last updated
Solomon Islands
Solomon Islands.jpg
Union Solomon Islands Rugby Union Federation
Head coachCorey Chapman
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First colours
World Rugby ranking
Current99 (as of 23 November 2020)
First international
Papua New Guinea 23–5 Solomon Islands
(18 August 1969)
Biggest win
Solomon Islands 61–7 Nauru
(27 August 2019)
Biggest defeat
Solomon Islands 3–113 Fiji
(21 August 1969)

The Solomon Islands national rugby union team represent Solomon Islands in the sport of rugby union.

Contents

They played their first internationals as part of the 3rd South Pacific Games in Port Moresby, beginning with a 5–23 loss to host team Papua New Guinea on 18 August 1969. Their first wins came soon after; 36-0 over Wallis and Futuna and 28-12 against New Caledonia to win the bronze medal. [1] Since then have played in only a small number of internationals, but did win bronze again in Port Moresby at the 9th South Pacific Games.

Solomon Islands have yet to qualify for the Rugby World Cup finals. The team did take part in the qualifying tournaments in Oceania for the 2003 Rugby World Cup in Australia, and the 2007 Rugby World Cup in France, but did not end up qualifying.

History

In November and December 2011, Solomon Islands competed in the Eastern Regional Pool of the 2011 FORU Oceania Cup. All matches were played at Lloyd Robson Oval in Port Moresby. In their first match, on 29 November, Solomon Islands recorded a notable 22-19 victory over the more fancied former champions Niue. [2] This was followed by a 33-15 loss to host nation, Papua New Guinea. [3] In their final pool match, Solomon Islands defeated Vanuatu 48-20 to finish second in the pool, behind Papua New Guinea. This victory set a new record winning margin for the Solomon Islands, eclipsing the previous best of 11-3, also against Vanuatu, in 2001. By virtue of their wins at the tournament, Solomon Islands climbed to an all-time high of 69th position on the IRB World Rankings, overtaking Niue in the process. [4]

Record

World Cup

World Cup record
YearQualification status
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Flag of New Zealand.svg 1987 Not invited
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Flag of Ireland.svg Flag of France.svg 1991 Did not enter
Flag of South Africa.svg 1995 Did not enter
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg 1999 Did not enter
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2003 Did not qualify
Flag of France.svg 2007 Did not qualify
Flag of New Zealand.svg 2011 Did not enter
Flag of England.svg 2015 Did not qualify
Flag of Japan.svg 2019 Did not qualify

Overall

AgainstPlayedWonLostDrawn% Won
Flag of American Samoa.svg  American Samoa 10100.00
Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 10100.00
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 20200.00
Flag of Nauru.svg  Nauru 1100100.00
New Caledonia flags merged (2017).svg  New Caledonia 211050.00
Flag of Niue.svg  Niue 321066.66
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 80800.00
Flag of French Polynesia.svg  Tahiti 431075.00
Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 10100.00
Flag of Vanuatu.svg  Vanuatu 431075.00
Flag of Wallis and Futuna.svg  Wallis and Futuna 1100100.00
Total281117039.29

Current squad

On July 30, the 31-man squad was selected for the 2019 Oceania Rugby Cup.

PlayerPositionDate of birth (age)Club
Lavern Tuhatangata Hooker Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Matangiki Rugby Club
Rodney Kavamauri Hooker 18 February 1983 (age 37) Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg TIA Rugby Club
Kasoa Watkin Prop 22 August 1984 (age 36) Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg TIA Rugby Club
Micky Tufunga Prop Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg TIA Rugby Club
Sifina Rukia Prop Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Islanders Rugby Club
Huddy Hou Prop 18 April 1988 (age 32) Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Matangiki Rugby Club
Edward Tangimoana Prop Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Matangiki Rugby Club
Ezekiel Mana Prop Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Islanders Rugby Club
Sunigeva Nasiu Lock Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Avaiki Rugby Club
Jack Akao Lock Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Henderson Hammerheads
Eddie Aete'e Lock Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Sosa Rugby Club
Kevin Muna Lock Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg TIA Rugby Club
Sonney Delaiverata Lock Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Henderson Hammerheads
Daniel Saomatangi Flanker Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Avaiki Rugby Club
PJ Lakoa Flanker Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Diesel Rugby Club
Saga Sade Samani Flanker Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Henderson Hammerheads
Vince Tohuika Flanker Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Matangiki Rugby Club
Castro Teaheniu Number 8 Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Matangiki Rugby Club
Paul Tema Number 8 Flag of Australia (converted).svg University of Queensland
Felix Galo Scrum-half Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Henderson Hammerheads
Charlie Tenge Scrum-half Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Police Rugby Club
Ronnie Saomatangi Fly-half Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg TIA Rugby Club
Edwin John Fly-half Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Matangiki Rugby Club
Roman Tongaka Centre Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Avaiki Rugby Club
Laban Taika Centre Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Matangiki Rugby Club
Moana Tepuke Centre Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Matangiki Rugby Club
Bobby Sade Centre Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Henderson Hammerheads
Timo Sanga Wing Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Avaiki Rugby Club
Eddie Sanga Wing Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Avaiki Rugby Club
Chris Saru Wing 23 June 1993 (age 27) Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Henderson Hammerheads
Mathew Qwaina Fullback Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Henderson Hammerheads
Moses Sinugamoana Fullback Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg Avaiki Rugby Club

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References

  1. "Complete results 3rd South Pacific Games". Pacific Islands Monthly. Pacific Publications. 40 (9): 36–37. 1 September 1969.
  2. "Sport: First round wins for PNG and Solomons in Oceania Rugby Cup". Radio New Zealand International. Retrieved 30 November 2011.
  3. "Pukpuks Rise". The National, Sport. The National. Retrieved 5 December 2011.
  4. "Solomon Islands climb to new high in rankings". Federation of Oceania Rugby Unions. Federation of Oceania Rugby Unions. Archived from the original on 22 January 2012. Retrieved 6 December 2011.