Souilly

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Souilly
Souilly2.JPG
The town hall in Souilly
Blason de la ville de Souilly (Meuse).svg
Coat of arms
Location of Souilly
France location map-Regions and departements-2016.svg
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Souilly
Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine region location map.svg
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Souilly
Coordinates: 49°01′43″N5°17′14″E / 49.0286°N 5.2872°E / 49.0286; 5.2872 Coordinates: 49°01′43″N5°17′14″E / 49.0286°N 5.2872°E / 49.0286; 5.2872
Country France
Region Grand Est
Department Meuse
Arrondissement Verdun
Canton Dieue-sur-Meuse
Intercommunality Communauté de communes de Souilly
Government
  Mayor (2008–2014) Christine Habart
Area
1
26.59 km2 (10.27 sq mi)
Population
 (2016-01-01) [1]
444
  Density17/km2 (43/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
55498 /55220
Elevation242–344 m (794–1,129 ft)
(avg. 350 m or 1,150 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

Souilly is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

The commune is a level of administrative division in the French Republic. French communes are analogous to civil townships and incorporated municipalities in the United States and Canada, Gemeinden in Germany, comuni in Italy or ayuntamiento in Spain. The United Kingdom has no exact equivalent, as communes resemble districts in urban areas, but are closer to parishes in rural areas where districts are much larger. Communes are based on historical geographic communities or villages and are vested with significant powers to manage the populations and land of the geographic area covered. The communes are the fourth-level administrative divisions of France.

Meuse (department) Department of France

Meuse is a department in northeast France, named after the River Meuse. Meuse is part of the current region of Grand Est and is surrounded by the French departments of Ardennes, Marne, Haute-Marne, Vosges, Meurthe-et-Moselle, and has a short border with Belgium on the north. Parts of Meuse belong to Parc naturel régional de Lorraine. Front lines in trench warfare during World War I ran varying courses through the department and it hosted an important battle/offensive in 1916 in and around Verdun.

In the administrative divisions of France, the department is one of the three levels of government below the national level, between the administrative regions and the commune. Ninety-five departments are in metropolitan France, and five are overseas departments, which are also classified as regions. Departments are further subdivided into 334 arrondissements, themselves divided into cantons; the last two have no autonomy, and are used for the organisation of police, fire departments, and sometimes, elections.

The Town Hall, fronting on the Voie Sacrée, served as headquarters for general Pétain and, later, general Nivelle during the Battle of Verdun in 1916. In 1918, it served as headquarters for general Pershing during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.

Voie Sacrée

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Philippe Pétain French military and political leader

Henri Philippe Benoni Omer Joseph Pétain, generally known as Philippe Pétain, Marshal Pétain or The Old Marshal, was a French general officer who attained the position of Marshal of France at the end of World War I, during which he became known as The Lion of Verdun, and in World War II served as the Chief of State of Vichy France from 1940 to 1944. Pétain, who was 84 years old in 1940, ranks as France's oldest head of state.

Robert Nivelle

Robert Georges Nivelle was a French artillery officer who served in the Boxer Rebellion, and the First World War. Nivelle was a very capable commander and organizer of field artillery at the regimental and divisional levels. In May 1916, he succeeded Philippe Pétain as commander of the French Second Army in the Battle of Verdun, leading counter-offensives that rolled back the German forces in late 1916. During these actions he and General Charles Mangin were already accused of wasting French lives.

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References

  1. "Populations légales 2016". INSEE . Retrieved 25 April 2019.