Sport climbing at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Last updated
Sport climbing
at the Games of the XXXII Olympiad
Sport Climbing, Tokyo 2020.svg
VenueAomi Urban Sports Park, Tokyo
Dates3–6 August 2021
No. of events2
Competitors40 from 19 nations
2024  

Sport climbing made its Olympic debut at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan [1] (postponed to 2021 [2] due to the COVID-19 pandemic ). Two events were held, one each for men and women. The format controversially consisted of one combined event with three disciplines: lead climbing, speed climbing and bouldering. The medals were determined based on best performance across all three disciplines. This format was previously tested at the 2018 Summer Youth Olympics. The Olympic code for sports climbing is CLB.

Contents

Two qualification boulders were leaked on YouTube; the video was quickly taken down and the boulders were reset. [3]

Format

On August 3, 2016, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) formally announced that sport climbing would be a medal sport in the 2020 Summer Olympics. [1] [4] The inclusion was proposed by the International Federation of Sport Climbing (IFSC) in 2015. [5]

The decision to combine three disciplines of lead climbing, bouldering, and speed climbing with one set of medals per gender caused widespread criticism in the climbing world. [6]

Climber Lynn Hill said the decision to include speed climbing was like "asking a middle distance runner to compete in the sprint." Czech climber Adam Ondra, who later competed as a finalist at the Olympics, voiced similar sentiments in an interview stating that anything would be better than this combination. There is some overlap between athletes in the categories of lead climbing and bouldering, but speed climbing is usually seen as a separate discipline which is practiced by specialized athletes. Climber Shauna Coxsey stated, "No boulderer has transitioned to speed and lead, and no speed climber has done it to bouldering and lead." [6] [7]

Members of the IFSC explained that they were only granted one gold medal per gender by the Olympic committee and they did not want to exclude speed climbing. The IFSC's goal for the 2020 Olympics was primarily to establish climbing and its three disciplines as Olympic sports; changes to the format could follow later. This tactic proved to be successful as they were granted a second set of medals for the 2024 Summer Olympics, where speed climbing will be a separate event from the combined event of lead climbing and bouldering. [6] [8] [9]

The final rankings were calculated by multiplying the climbers' rankings in each discipline, with the best score being the lowest one. [10] [11]

Qualification

There were 40 quota spots available for sport climbing. Each National Olympic Committee could obtain a maximum of 2 spots in each event (total 4 maximum across the 2 events). Each event had 20 competitors qualify: 18 from qualification, 1 from the host (Japan), and 1 from Tripartite Commission invitations. [12]

The 2019 IFSC Climbing World Championships served as one qualification event with 7 spots per gender being awarded to the top finishers of the combined event. [13] [14]

Schedule

The schedule for the events was as follows. [15] [16]

DateAug 3Aug 4Aug 5Aug 6
Men's S Qualification: Speed climbingB Qualification: BoulderingL Qualification: Lead climbingS Finals: Speed climbingB Finals: BoulderingL Finals: Lead climbing
Women's S Qualification: Speed climbingB Qualification: BoulderingL Qualification: Lead climbingS Finals: Speed climbingB Finals: BoulderingL Finals: Lead climbing
S = Speed, B = Bouldering, L = Lead
QQualificationFFinals

Participating nations

40 climbers from 19 nations qualified. Qualification events included the 2019 IFSC Climbing World Championships, Olympic Qualifying Event, and continental championships.

Medal summary

Medal table

  *   Host nation (Japan)

RankNOCGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 1001
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1001
3Flag of Japan.svg  Japan*0112
4Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0101
5Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 0011
Totals (5 NOCs)2226

Medalists

EventGoldSilverBronze
Men's combined
details
Alberto Ginés López
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
Nathaniel Coleman
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Jakob Schubert
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
Women's combined
details
Janja Garnbret
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia
Miho Nonaka
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Akiyo Noguchi
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan

Records broken

EventRoundClimberNationTimeDateRecord
Men's combined (speed)Qualification Bassa Mawem Flag of France.svg  France 5.453 August OR [17]
Women's combined (speed)Qualification Aleksandra Mirosław Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 6.974 August OR [18]
Final Aleksandra Mirosław Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 6.846 August WR [19]

See also

Related Research Articles

Climbing competition

A climbing competition is usually held indoors on purpose built climbing walls. There are three main types of climbing competition: lead, speed, and bouldering. In lead climbing, the competitors start at the bottom of a route and must climb it within a certain time frame in a single attempt, making sure to clip the rope into pre-placed quickdraws along the route. Bouldering competitions consist of climbing short problems without rope, with the emphasis on number of problems completed and the attempts necessary to do so. Speed climbing can either be an individual or team event, with the person or team that can climb a standardized route the fastest winning.

Sean McColl Canadian rock climber (born 1987)

Sean McColl is a professional rock climber from North Vancouver, Canada. He competes in the lead climbing, speed climbing, and bouldering disciplines, and has won major competitions in all three.

The IFSC Climbing World Championships are the biennial world championships for competition climbing organized by the International Federation of Sport Climbing (IFSC). This event determines the male and female world champions in the three disciplines of sport climbing: lead climbing, bouldering, and speed climbing. Since 2012, a Combined ranking is also determined, for climbers competing in all disciplines, and additional medals are awarded based on that ranking.

Shauna Coxsey English rock climber

Shauna Coxsey is an English professional rock climber. She is the most successful competition climber in the UK, having won the IFSC Bouldering World Cup Season in both 2016 and 2017. She retired from competition climbing after competing in the 2020 Olympics.

Janja Garnbret Slovenian sport climber

Janja Garnbret is a Slovenian rock climber and sport climber who has won multiple lead climbing and bouldering events. In 2021, she became the first ever female Olympic gold medalist in sport climbing, and is widely regarded as the greatest competitive climber of all time.

Akiyo Noguchi Japanese climber

Akiyo Noguchi is a Japanese professional rock climber, sport climber and boulderer.

Sport climbing at the Summer Olympics

Sport climbing made its Olympic debut at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan. The Olympics was originally scheduled to be held in 2020, but was postponed to 2021 due to COVID-19 pandemic. It is governed by the International Federation of Sport Climbing (IFSC).

Miho Nonaka Japanese rock climber

Miho Nonaka is a Japanese competition boulderer. She competed at the 2020 Summer Olympics, in Women's combined, winning a silver medal.

There are 40 quota spots available for sport climbing at the 2020 Summer Olympics. Each National Olympic Committee (NOC) can obtain a maximum of 2 spots in each event. Each event will have 20 competitors qualify: 18 from qualifying, 1 from the host (Japan), and 1 from Tripartite Commission invitations.

Iuliia Kaplina Russian sport climber

Iuliia Vladimirovna Kaplina is a Russian sport climber who has won multiple speed climbing events and set multiple world records. She was the world record holder in women's speed climbing until 6 August 2021, setting the record at the 2020 European Championships in Moscow (6.964).

2019 IFSC Climbing World Championships

The 2019 IFSC Climbing World Championships, the 16th edition, were held in Hachioji, Japan from 11 to 21 August 2019. The championships consisted of lead, speed, bouldering, and combined events. The paraclimbing event was held separately from 16 to 17 July in Briançon, France. The combined event also served as an Olympic qualifying event for the 2020 Summer Olympics.

Ludovico Fossali Italian speed climber

Ludovico Fossali, born May 21, 1997, is an Italian speed climber. He won the speed climbing gold medal at the 2019 IFSC Climbing World Championships in Hachioji, Japan. He placed 9th in the Combined event, securing a qualification for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

Aleksandra Mirosław Polish speed climber

Aleksandra Mirosław is a Polish speed climber and a two-time speed climbing world champion as well as the current speed climbing world record holder.

Petra Klingler Swiss climber

Petra Klingler is a Swiss competition rock climber. Known as a versatile climber, she competes in bouldering and speed, lead, and ice climbing. It is historically rare for a climber to compete in so many different disciplines, especially ice climbing, although the combined format of the Tokyo Olympics has made it more common. Klingler was encouraged by her former coach to try ice climbing for fun, and as a way to build mental discipline.

Ai Mori Japanese climber (born 2003)

Ai Mori is a Japanese professional rock climber, sport climber and boulderer. She participates in both bouldering, lead and combined climbing competitions. She is known for being the youngest Japanese person ever to finish on the podium at the sport climbing world championships.

Sport climbing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Mens combined Mens combined events at the Olympics

The men's combined event at the 2020 Summer Olympics was a climbing competition combining three disciplines. It was held from August 3 to August 5, 2021 at the Aomi Urban Sports Park in Tokyo. A total of 20 athletes from 15 nations competed. Sport climbing was one of four new sports added to the Olympic program for 2020.

Sport climbing at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Womens combined Womens combined events at the Olympics

The women's combined event at the 2020 Summer Olympics was a climbing competition combining three disciplines. It took place between 4 and 6 August 2021 at the Aomi Urban Sports Park in Tokyo. 20 athletes from 15 nations competed. Sport climbing was one of four new sports added to the Olympic program for 2020.

The 2020 IFSC Climbing European Championships, the 13th edition, were held in Moscow, Russia from 20 to 28 November 2020. The championships consisted of lead, speed, bouldering, and combined events. The winners of the last event will automatically qualify for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan, where climbing will make its debut.

Mickaël Mawem French professional rock climber (born 1990)

Mickaël Mawem is a French professional rock climber. He qualified for the 2020 Summer Olympics through finishing 7th at the 2019 IFSC Climbing World Championships. He also won the bouldering event at the 2019 IFSC Climbing European Championships.

The 2019 IFSC Combined Qualifier was an Olympic Qualifying Event. It was held from 28 November to 1 December 2019 in Toulouse, France. It was organized by the French Federation of Sport Climbing and Mountaineering or FFME. The athletes competed in combined format of three disciplines: speed, bouldering, and lead, simulating the 2020 Olympics format. Six athletes per gender would qualify for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics through this event. The winner for men was Kokoro Fujii and for women was Futaba Ito.

References

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