Thomas Porcher Stoney

Last updated
Thomas Porcher Stoney
53rd Mayor of Charleston
In office
1923–1931
Preceded by John P. Grace
Succeeded by Burnett R. Maybank
Personal details
BornDecember 16, 1889
Goose Creek, South Carolina
DiedApril 22, 1973(1973-04-22) (aged 83)
Spouse(s)Beverly Means DuBose
ChildrenTheodore DuBose Stoney, Laurence O'Hear Stoney, Randell Croft Stoney
Alma mater University of the South, Sewanee, TN ; University of South Carolina School of Law (1911)
Mayor Stoney lived at 573 Huger St. in the Hampton Park Terrace neighborhood while serving as mayor. 573 Huger - Feb 2011.jpg
Mayor Stoney lived at 573 Huger St. in the Hampton Park Terrace neighborhood while serving as mayor.

Thomas Porcher Stoney was the fifty-third mayor of Charleston, South Carolina, serving between 1923 and 1931.

Charleston, South Carolina City in the United States

Charleston is the oldest and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina, the county seat of Charleston County, and the principal city in the Charleston–North Charleston–Summerville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city lies just south of the geographical midpoint of South Carolina's coastline and is located on Charleston Harbor, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean formed by the confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. Charleston had an estimated population of 134,875 in 2017. The estimated population of the Charleston metropolitan area, comprising Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties, was 761,155 residents in 2016, the third-largest in the state and the 78th-largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States.

Stoney graduated from the University of South Carolina School of Law in 1911 and began a private law practice in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1915, he was elected solicitor (prosecutor) for the Ninth Judicial Circuit, the youngest solicitor elected at that time. [1] He remained in that office until 1923 when he was elected mayor of Charleston. He was re-elected in 1927 and completed that term. One of his major accomplishments as mayor was the creation of a municipal airport; the original site was on James Island, but it was moved to the present location in 1929. His administration also oversaw the construction of recreational facilities; the municipal golf course was laid out, William Moultrie Playground was opened, and Johnson Hagood Stadium (then a municipal facility, but today the football stadium for The Citadel) was built.

Johnson Hagood Stadium is an 11,500-seat football stadium in Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Johnson Hagood Stadium, is an 11,500-seat football stadium, the home field of The Citadel Bulldogs, in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The stadium is named in honor of Brigadier General Johnson Hagood, CSA, class of 1847, who commanded Confederate forces in Charleston during the Civil War and later served as Comptroller and Governor of South Carolina.

The Citadel Bulldogs football represents The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision

The Citadel Bulldogs football program represents The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). The Bulldogs play in the Southern Conference, as they have since 1936. The Bulldogs are coached by Brent Thompson, who was hired on January 19, 2016 to replace Mike Houston, who became the head football coach of James Madison University on January 18, 2016.

He ran for a United States Senate seat but lost in the Democratic primary to James F. Byrnes in 1936 by a margin of about 10-to-1. [2] During his life he swung across the political spectrum. He was a solid democrat in his early political life, but grew disaffected with the New Deal. In 1936 he gave a speech about the New Deal and said, "[A]ll of this spending is like giving a drunk some drinks to sober him up." [3] By 1964 he campaigned for Barry Goldwater, saying that the Democratic Party was "set upon a course that is hell-bent for national socialism."

Stoney died on April 22, 1973. He was struck while walking across a road. The driver left the scene of the accident and was never found. The once stately Charleston gentleman died at the tragic accident scene. [4]

Stoney was born at Medway Plantation on December 16, 1889, in rural Berkeley County, South Carolina to Samuel Stoney and Eliza Croft Stoney. [5] He is buried at Strawberry Chapel in Berkeley County, South Carolina. [6]

Medway (Mount Holly, South Carolina) plantation in Mount Holly, South Carolina

Medway or the Medway Plantation is a plantation in Mount Holly, South Carolina within Berkeley County, South Carolina. It is about 2 mi (3.2 km) east of U.S. Route 52 from the unincorporated community of Mount Holly, which is directly north of Goose Creek, South Carolina. It was named to the National Register of Historic Places on July 16, 1970.

Strawberry Chapel and Childsbury Town Site human settlement in South Carolina, United States of America

Strawberry Chapel is a parochial chapel of ease in the lower part of St. John's, Berkeley Parish in Berkeley County, South Carolina that was built in 1725. It is on Strawberry Chapel Road between South Carolina State Highway 8-44 and the West Branch of the Cooper River. The Town of Childsbury was a planned community that was settled in 1707. The town no longer exists. They were named to the National Register of Historic Places on April 26, 1972.

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References

  1. "Will Resign About Dec. 1". Evening Post. Charleston, South Carolina. November 9, 1923. p. 7. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
  2. "New Deal Denied Credit for Huge Byrnes Victory". News and Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. August 27, 1936. pp. 1A. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
  3. "Congressional Record". Congressional Record. United States Congress. 1973. p. 13537. Retrieved May 3, 2014.
  4. "Thomas P. Stoney Killed In Hit-Run". Charleston News & Courier. April 23, 1973. pp. A1. Retrieved January 18, 2014.
  5. Heitzler, Michael J. (2005). Goose Creek: A Definitive History. Charleston, South Carolina: The History Press. p. 242. ISBN   9781596290556.
  6. "Samuel Porcher Stoney (1889-1973)". Find a Grave. Retrieved January 18, 2014.
Preceded by
John P. Grace
Mayor of Charleston, South Carolina
1923–1931
Succeeded by
Burnett R. Maybank