Thomas Rhett Smith

Last updated
Thomas Rhett Smith
21st Mayor of Charleston
In office
1813 March 1815
Preceded by Thomas Bennett Jr.
Succeeded by Elias Horry
Personal details
Born 1768
Died March 28, 1829
Political party Federalist
Spouse(s) Anne Rebecca Skirving (m. 1795)
Children Anne Hutchinson Smith Elliott
Alma mater Cambridge University
Thomas Rhett Smith acquired the John Drayton House at 2 Ladson St., Charleston in 1813 and occupied it during his time as mayor of the city. 2 Ladson.jpg
Thomas Rhett Smith acquired the John Drayton House at 2 Ladson St., Charleston in 1813 and occupied it during his time as mayor of the city.

Thomas Rhett Smith was the twenty-first intendant (mayor) of Charleston, South Carolina, serving from 1813 to March 1815.

Charleston, South Carolina City in the United States

Charleston is the oldest and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina, the county seat of Charleston County, and the principal city in the Charleston–North Charleston–Summerville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city lies just south of the geographical midpoint of South Carolina's coastline and is located on Charleston Harbor, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean formed by the confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. Charleston had an estimated population of 134,875 in 2017. The estimated population of the Charleston metropolitan area, comprising Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties, was 761,155 residents in 2016, the third-largest in the state and the 78th-largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States.

Smith was born in 1768 to Roger Smith and Mary Rutledge. He served in the South Carolina House of Representatives for St. James and Goose Creek Parish during four session, 1792–1799. [1] In September 1796, he was elected to be a warden (city council member) for Charleston and was re-elected in September 1797. [2] [3] In 1800-1801, he served another term, representing the Charleston area. [4]

Smith was elected intendant on September 20, 1813, by a vote of 465 (Smith) to 318 (Democrat Thomas Bennett Jr.) [5] and was re-elected on September 19, 1814. He did not complete his second term; he resigned in March 1815 and was replaced by Elias Horry. [4]

Elias Horry American politician

Elias Horry was a lawyer, politician, businessman and plantation owner who twice served in the South Carolina General Assembly as well as the intendant (mayor) of Charleston, South Carolina, serving two terms from 1815 to 1817 and 1820 to 1821.

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References

  1. "ELECTIONS". City Gazette and Daily Advertiser. Charleston, South Carolina. October 13, 1796. p. 3. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  2. "The following gentlemen were yesterday elected . ." City Gazette and Daily Advertiser. Charleston, South Carolina. September 6, 1796. p. 3. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  3. "Yesterday elections were held . ." City Gazette and Daily Advertiser. Charleston, South Carolina. September 5, 1797. p. 3. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  4. 1 2 "THOMAS RHETT SMITH". Halsey Map Project. Preservation Society of Charleston. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  5. "Triumph of Federalism!". Northern Whig. Hudson, New York. October 5, 1813. p. 3. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
Preceded by
Thomas Bennett Jr.
Mayor of Charleston, South Carolina
1813–1815
Succeeded by
Elias Horry