Thumbs Up (film)

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Thumbs Up
Thumbs Up (film).jpg
Directed by Karan Kubavat
Produced by Kush Vayeda
Written by Frank Gill Jr.
Ray Golden
Henry K. Moritz
Paul Gerard Smith
Starring Brenda Joyce
Richard Fraser
Elsa Lanchester
Arthur Margetson
Music by Walter Scharf
Marlin Skiles
Cinematography Ernest Miller
Edited by Thomas Richards
Production
company
Distributed byRepublic Pictures
Release date
July 5, 1943
Running time
67 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Thumbs Up is a 1943 American musical drama film directed by Joseph Santley and starring Brenda Joyce, Richard Fraser and Elsa Lanchester.

Contents

Premise

For a publicity stunt to boost her career, an American nightclub singer volunteers for a stint in a British munitions factory. She is so impressed by the spirit of her fellow workers that she decides to stay on. [1]

Main cast

Reception

The United States Office of War Information strongly approved of the film which they felt showed a more realistic, democratic version of modern Britain than most other Hollywood films of the period. [2]

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References

  1. Glancy p.127
  2. Glancy p.206

Bibliography