Tibetan rosefinch

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Tibetan rosefinch
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Fringillidae
Subfamily: Carduelinae
Genus: Carpodacus
Species:
C. roborowskii
Binomial name
Carpodacus roborowskii
(Przewalski, 1887)

The Tibetan rosefinch (Carpodacus roborowskii), also known as Roborovski's rosefinch, is a species of rosefinch in the finch family Fringillidae. It is sometimes placed in the monotypic genus Kozlowia. It is endemic to the Tibetan Plateau. Its natural habitat is montane tundra.

Contents

Distribution and habitat

The Tibetan rosefinch is found in northeastern Tibet, in the Buckhan Boda Shan, Amne Machin and Kunlun mountains in Qinghai. These birds live among rocky steppes and alpine pastures, in areas with sparse vegetation. Because of its desolate habitat, the Tibetan rosefinch's range is shared with few other birds, aside from Brandt's mountain finch. [2]

Behavior

Tibetan rosefinches are diurnal. They live mostly on the ground, traveling quickly hopping in search of food.

Diet

Tibetan rosefinches are ground feeders. They feed mainly on seeds, as well as fragments of flowers including the lousewort (Pedicularis). [3]

Vocalization

The Tibetan rosefinch is mainly silent. Its call consists of brief whistling, along with louder trills, particularly in flight. [3] [4] It occasionally makes hissing sounds. [3]

Related Research Articles

Finch Family of birds

The true finches are small to medium-sized passerine birds in the family Fringillidae. Finches have stout conical bills adapted for eating seeds and nuts and often have colourful plumage. They occupy a great range of habitats where they are usually resident and do not migrate. They have a worldwide distribution except for Australia and the polar regions. The family Fringillidae contains more than two hundred species divided into fifty genera. It includes species known as siskins, canaries, redpolls, serins, grosbeaks and euphonias.

Rosefinch genus of birds

The rosefinches are a genus, Carpodacus, of passerine birds in the finch family Fringillidae. Most are called "rosefinches" and as the word implies, have various shades of red in their plumage. The common rosefinch is frequently called the "rosefinch". The genus name is from Ancient Greek karpos, "fruit" and dakno, "to bite".

Common rosefinch species of bird

The common rosefinch or scarlet rosefinch is the most widespread and common rosefinch of Asia and Europe.

Purple finch species of bird

The purple finch is a bird in the finch family, Fringillidae.

Cassins finch species of bird

Cassin's finch is a bird in the finch family, Fringillidae. This species and the other "American rosefinches" are placed in the genus Haemorhous.

Pine grosbeak species of bird

The pine grosbeak is a large member of the true finch family, Fringillidae. It is the only species in the genus Pinicola. It is found in coniferous woods across Alaska, the western mountains of the United States, Canada, and in subarctic Fennoscandia and across the Palearctic to Siberia. The species is a frugivore, especially in winter, favoring small fruits, such as rowans. With fruit-crop abundance varying from year to year, pine grosbeak is one of many subarctic-resident bird species that exhibit irruptive behavior. In irruption years, individuals can move long distances in search of suitable food supplies, bringing them farther south and/or downslope than is typical of years with large fruit crops.

Przevalskis finch species of bird

Przevalski's finch, Przewalski's finch or Przevalski's pinktail, is an unusual passerine bird from the mountains of central-west China. The species is named for Nikolai Przhevalsky, the Russian explorer who described it. Its taxonomic affinities were unclear for a long time, giving rise to other common names, the pink-tailed bunting and the Przewalski's rosefinch. In 2000 it was proposed that it should in fact be regarded neither as a finch nor a bunting, but as the only member of the family Urocynchramidae, something that had been originally proposed in the German ornithological literature as long ago as 1918 by Janusz von Domaniewski, and also by Wolters in 1979. This change was adopted in the sixth edition of the Clements checklist.

Spot-winged rosefinch species of bird

The spot-winged rosefinch, also known as the spotted rosefinch, is a species of finch in the family Fringillidae. It is found in India and Nepal. Sharpe's rosefinch was formerly considered conspecific with it. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.

Pallass rosefinch species of bird

Pallas's rosefinch is a species of bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It is found in China, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Mongolia, and Russia. Birds are occasionally reported from further west and there are records from several European regions, including Britain, but the cage-bird trade makes the origin of some such birds hard to assess. Its natural habitats are boreal forests and boreal shrubland.

Blanfords rosefinch species of bird

Blanford's rosefinch or the crimson rosefinch, is a species of finch in the family Fringillidae. It is found in Bhutan, China, India, and Nepal. Its natural habitat is boreal forest.

Great rosefinch species of bird

The great rosefinch is a species of finch in the family Fringillidae. It is found in Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Pakistan, Russia, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan and east to China. Its natural habitats are tundra and temperate grassland.

Vinaceous rosefinch species of finch in the Fringillidae family

The vinaceous rosefinch is a species of finch in the family Fringillidae.

Sillems mountain finch species of bird

Sillem's mountain finch or the tawny-headed mountain finch is a species of rosefinch in the finch family. It is found only in China and was only known from two specimens collected in 1929 from the Aksai Chin area of southern Xinjiang Autonomous Region. In 2012, the bird was photographed 1500 km from the original collection location. This species was originally placed in the genus Leucosticte but a phylogenetic study using mitochondrial DNA sequences published in 2016 found that Sillem's mountain finch was a sister species to the Tibetan rosefinch. The International Ornithological Committee therefore moved Sillem's mountain finch to the genus Carpodacus.

Crimson-browed finch species of bird

The crimson-browed finch is a true finch species. It is found in Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, and Nepal. Its natural habitats are temperate forests and temperate shrubland.

Long-tailed rosefinch species of bird

The long-tailed rosefinch is a species of finch of the family Fringillidae.

Sharpe's rosefinch, is a species of finch in the family Fringillidae. It is found in central China and far northern Myanmar. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It was formerly considered to be a subspecies of the spot-winged rosefinch.

Blyths rosefinch species of bird

Blyth's rosefinch or the Himalayan rosefinch, is a species of finch in the family Fringillidae. It is found in northern Afghanistan to the western Himalayas. Its natural habitats are temperate forest and boreal shrubland. It is sometimes considered a subspecies of the red-mantled rosefinch.

Chinese white-browed rosefinch species of bird

The Chinese white-browed rosefinch is a true finch species.

Chinese beautiful rosefinch species of bird

The Chinese beautiful rosefinch is a true finch species. It is one of the rosefinches that might belong in the genus Propasser. It is found in China. Its natural habitats are temperate shrubland and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.

American rosefinch genus of birds

The American rosefinches that form the genus Haemorhous, are a group of passerine birds in the finch family Fringillidae. As the name implies, various shades of red are characteristic plumage colors of this group. They are found throughout the North American continent.

References

  1. BirdLife International (2012). "Carpodacus roborowskii". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2012. Retrieved 26 November 2013.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  2. Clement, P.; Harris, A.; Davis, J. (2010). Finches and Sparrows. Helm Identification Guides. Bloomsbury Publishing. ISBN   978-1-4081-3530-3 . Retrieved 2019-09-01.
  3. 1 2 3 Clement, P (2019). "Tibetan Rosefinch (Carpodacus roborowskii)". Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. Retrieved 1 September 2019.
  4. "Tibetan Rosefinch (Carpodacus roborowskii) :: xeno-canto". xeno-canto. 2016-06-16. Retrieved 2019-09-03.