Tien Shan red-backed vole

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Tien Shan Red-backed Vole
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Cricetidae
Subfamily: Arvicolinae
Genus: Myodes
Species:
M. centralis
Binomial name
Myodes centralis
(Miller, 1906)

The Tien Shan red-backed vole (Myodes centralis) is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found in China and Kyrgyzstan.

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References

  1. Tsytsulina, K. (2008). "Myodes centralis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2008. Retrieved 30 June 2009. Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of least concern.