Tomaccio

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Tomaccio
TomateCherryTross.jpg
Cherry tomatoes similar to the Tomaccio variety
Genus Solanum
Species Solanum lycopersicum
Cultivar Tomaccio
Marketing names Sweet raisin tomato
BreederHishtil
Origin Israel

Tomaccio tomatoes resulted from a 12-year breeding program using a wild Peruvian tomato species. The program was developed by Hishtil in Israel. Tomaccio is a vigorous, high yielding, early fruiting cherry tomato bred primarily for the sun-dried tomato market. [1]

Tomaccio tomatoes have an intense, sugary flavor when picked fresh or dried at home. Tomaccio plants can reach heights of nine feet and yield 13-18 pounds of fruit per season.

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