Tomoxia

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Tomoxia
Tomoxia bucephala side.JPG
Tomoxia bucephala
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Tomoxia

Costa, 1854

Tomoxia is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species: [1]

Beetle Order of insects

Beetles are a group of insects that form the order Coleoptera, in the superorder Endopterygota. Their front pair of wings are hardened into wing-cases, elytra, distinguishing them from most other insects. The Coleoptera, with about 400,000 species, is the largest of all orders, constituting almost 40% of described insects and 25% of all known animal life-forms; new species are discovered frequently. The largest of all families, the Curculionidae (weevils) with some 83,000 member species, belongs to this order. Found in almost every habitat except the sea and the polar regions, they interact with their ecosystems in several ways: beetles often feed on plants and fungi, break down animal and plant debris, and eat other invertebrates. Some species are serious agricultural pests, such as the Colorado potato beetle, while others such as Coccinellidae eat aphids, scale insects, thrips, and other plant-sucking insects that damage crops.

Mordellidae family of insects

The Mordellidae are a family of beetles commonly known as tumbling flower beetles for the typical irregular movements they make when escaping predators, or as pintail beetles due to their abdominal tip which aids them in performing these tumbling movements. Worldwide, there are about 1500 species.

Tomoxia abrupta is a species of beetle in the genus Tomoxia of the family Mordellidae. It was described by Ray in 1944.

Tomoxia albonotata is a species of beetle in the genus Tomoxia of the family Mordellidae. It was described by Maeklin in 1875.

Tomoxia alboscutella is a species of beetle in the genus Tomoxia of the family Mordellidae. It was described by Ermisch in 1955.

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<i>Mordella</i> genus of insects

Mordella is the type genus of the tumbling flower beetle family (Mordellidae), its subfamily Mordellinae and the tribe Mordellini. It is widely distributed in the Holarctic and adjacent regions. The larvae are primarily dead wood borers.

<i>Acmaeodera</i> Genus of beetles

Acmaeodera is a genus of beetles in the family Buprestidae, a group of metallic wood-boring beetles favored by insect collectors. Whereas most beetles including most buprestids fly with their elytra held out and vibrating their hindwings to give lift and thrust, the Acmaedodera, however, fly with their hind wings only — the elytra are fused down the center and form a shield over the insect's abdomen, even during flight. This fact, combined with the banding across the abdomen which is common in this family, gives many of them a distinct wasp-like appearance when in flight. Several are therefore considered hymenopteran mimics.

<i>Glipa</i> genus of insects

Glipa is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

<i>Hoshihananomia</i> genus of insects

Hoshihananomia is a genus of tumbling flower beetles in the family Mordellidae. There are at least 40 described species in Hoshihananomia.

Glipostenoda is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Mordellina is a genus of tumbling flower beetles in the family Mordellidae.

<i>Mordellistena</i> genus of insects

Mordellistena is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Stenalia is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

<i>Epicauta</i> genus of insects

Epicauta is a genus of beetles in the blister beetle family, Meloidae. The genus was first scientifically described in 1834 by Pierre François Marie Auguste Dejean. Epicauta is distributed nearly worldwide, with species native to all continents except Australia. Surveys have found the genus to be particularly diverse in northern Arizona in the United States. Few species occur in the Arctic, with none farther north than the southern Northwest Territory of Canada.

Mordellinae subfamily of insects

Mordellinae is a subfamily of beetles commonly known as tumbling flower beetles for the typical irregular movements they make when escaping predators, or as pintail beetles due to their abdominal tip which aids them in performing these tumbling movements.

References

  1. Mordellidae Species List at Joel Hallan’s Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University, archived from the original on 7 October 2014, retrieved 8 August 2015