Triplarina

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Triplarina
Triplarina volcanica.jpg
Triplarina volcanica in the North Coast Regional Botanic Garden
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Subfamily: Myrtoideae
Tribe: Chamelaucieae
Genus: Triplarina
Raf. [1]
Species

See list.

Synonyms [1]

Triplarina is a genus of seven species of flowering plants in the family Myrtaceae. They are Baeckea -like shrubs with small leaves arranged in opposite pairs and flowers with five sepals, five more or less round petals, and fourteen to eighteen stamens that are shorter than the petals. Species of Triplarina occur in New South Wales and Queensland usually growing in woodland or forest.

Contents

Description

Plants in the genus Triplarina are shrubs with small leaves arranged in opposite pairs, sometimes with wavy or finely-toothed edges, and oil-dots visible on the lower surface. The flowers are arranged in leaf axils, sometimes in pairs and the flowers have five sepals, five petals and fourteen to eighteen stamens. The sepals remain attached to the fruit but the petals that are white to deep pink and more or less round are lost as the fruit develops. The ovary is half-inferior and has three locules, each containing eight to thirteen ovules, and the fruit is a capsule containing kidney-shaped seeds. [2] [3]

Taxonomy

The genus Triplarina was first formally described in 1838 by Constantine Samuel Rafinesque in his book Sylva Telluriana. [4] [5] The first species he described was T. camphorata, now known as Triplarina imbricata . [3] [5] [6]

Species list

The names of seven species of Triplarina are accepted at the Australian Plant Census: [7]

Distribution and habitat

Shrubs in the genus Triplarina usually grow in woodland or forest, rarely in heath, and are mostly found in small, isolated populations in sheltered positions near the coast, although T. paludosa grows on tablelands 180 km (110 mi) from the coast. They occur from near Ravenshoe in Queensland to near Nowra in New South Wales.

Related Research Articles

<i>Leptospermum</i> Genus of shrubs

Leptospermum is a genus of shrubs and small trees in the myrtle family Myrtaceae commonly known as tea trees, although this name is sometimes also used for some species of Melaleuca. Most species are endemic to Australia, with the greatest diversity in the south of the continent, but some are native to other parts of the world, including New Zealand and Southeast Asia. Leptospermums all have five conspicuous petals and five groups of stamens which alternate with the petals. There is a single style in the centre of the flower and the fruit is a woody capsule.

<i>Angophora</i> Genus of flowering plants

Angophora is a genus of nine species of trees and shrubs in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae. Endemic to eastern Australia, they differ from other eucalypts in having juvenile and adult leaves arranged in opposite pairs, sepals reduced to projections on the edge of the floral cup, four or five overlapping, more or less round petals, and a papery or thin, woody, often strongly ribbed capsule. Species are found between the Atherton Tableland in Queensland and south through New South Wales to eastern Victoria, Australia.

<i>Darwinia</i> (plant) Genus of flowering plants

Darwinia, sometimes commonly known as mountain bells or simply bells, is a genus of about 70 species of evergreen shrubs in the family Myrtaceae, endemic to southeastern and southwestern Australia. The majority are native to southern Western Australia, but a few species occur in South Australia, New South Wales and Victoria. The genus was named in honour of Erasmus Darwin, grandfather of Charles Darwin by Edward Rudge in 1816. Most darwinias grow to a height of between 0.2 and 3 m, and many are prostrate shrubs. Most have small, simple leaves and the flowers are often grouped together, each flower with five red, white or greenish petals and ten stamens. In many species, the flowers are surrounded by large, colourful bracts, giving rise to their common names.

<i>Bosistoa</i> Genus of flowering plants

Bosistoa is a genus of four species of tree in the family Rutaceae endemic to eastern Australia. They have simple or compound leaves arranged in opposite pairs and bisexual flowers arranged in panicles, each flower with five sepals, five white petals and ten stamens.

<i>Pandorea</i> Genus of vines

Pandorea is a genus of nine species of flowering plants in the family Bignoniaceae and is native to Australia, Malesia, New Guinea and New Caledonia. Plants in the genus Pandorea are mostly woody climbers with imparipinnate leaves arranged in opposite pairs, flowers in groups with tube-shaped flowers, and winged seeds.

<i>Kunzea</i> Genus of flowering plants

Kunzea is a genus of plants in the family Myrtaceae and is endemic to Australasia. They are shrubs, sometimes small trees and usually have small, crowded, rather aromatic leaves. The flowers are similar to those of plants in the genus Leptospermum but differ in having stamens that are longer than the petals. Most kunzeas are endemic to Western Australia but a few occur in eastern Australia and a few are found in New Zealand. The taxonomy of the genus is not settled and is complicated by the existence of a number of hybrids.

<i>Baeckea</i> Genus of flowering plants

Baeckea is a genus of flowering plants in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae, all but one endemic to Australia. Plants in the genus Baeckea are shrubs or small trees with leaves arranged in opposite pairs, white to deep pink flowers with five sepals and five petals, and five to fifteen stamens that are shorter than the petals.

<i>Homoranthus</i> Genus of flowering plants

Homoranthus is a genus of about thirty species of plants in the myrtle family Myrtaceae and all are endemic to Australia. Plants in this genus share similarities with those in both Darwinia and Verticordia. They are shrubs with their leaves arranged in opposite pairs and with flowers appearing either singly or in small groups, usually in upper leaf axils. They are found in Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia. The genus was first described in 1836. None of the species is common nor are they well-known in horticulture.

<i>Asterolasia</i> Genus of flowering plants

Asterolasia is a genus of seventeen species of erect or prostrate shrubs in the family Rutaceae, and is endemic to Australia. The leaves are simple and arranged alternately, the flowers arranged in umbel-like groups on the ends of branchlets or in leaf axils, usually with five sepals, five petals and ten to twenty-five stamens. There are seventeen species and they are found in all Australian mainland states but not in the Northern Territory.

<i>Thryptomene</i> Genus of flowering plants

Thryptomene is a genus of flowering plants in the family Myrtaceae and is endemic to Australia. Plants in the genus Thryptomene are shrubs with small leaves arranged in opposite pairs and white or pink flowers. About forty-seven species of Thryptomene, occurring in all Australian states and the Northern Territory, have been formally described.

<i>Medicosma</i> Genus of flowering plants

Medicosma is a genus of shrubs and trees in the family Rutaceae, all native to New Guinea, Australia or New Caledonia. They usually have simple leaves arranged in opposite pairs, flowers arranged in cymes with four sepals, four petals and eight stamens. The fruit is a follicle fused at the base in groups of up to four, each containing one or two brown or black seeds.

<i>Phebalium</i> Genus of shrubs

Phebalium is a genus of thirty species of shrubs or small trees in the family Rutaceae and is endemic to Australia. The leaves are arranged alternately, simple and often warty, the flowers arranged singly or in umbels on the ends of branchlets or in leaf axils, usually with five sepals, five petals and ten stamens. There are about thirty species and they are found in all Australian states but not in the Northern Territory.

<i>Acradenia</i> Genus of flowering plants

Acradenia is a genus of two species of tree or shrub in the family Rutaceae and is endemic to Australia. These plants have leaves that are trifoliate, arranged in opposite pairs and flowers that have five sepals, five petals and usually ten stamens of unequal lengths.

<i>Nematolepis</i> Genus of shrubs

Nematolepis is a genus of seven species of plants in the family Rutaceae, all endemic to Australia. They are shrubs or small trees with more or less flat leaves arranged alternately and flowers with five overlapping petals and ten stamens. Six species are found in eastern Australia and one in Western Australia.

Triplarina calophylla is a species of flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to a restricted area of north Queensland. It is a shrub with egg-shaped leaves with the narrower end towards the base, flowers with five sepals, five white petals and fourteen or fifteen stamens.

<i>Triplarina imbricata</i> Species of flowering plant

Triplarina imbricata, commonly known as creek triplarina, is a species of flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to northern New South Wales. It is a shrub with weeping branches, narrow egg-shaped leaves, and flowers in pairs with five sepals, five relatively small white petals and fourteen to seventeen stamens.

Triplarina nitchaga is a species of flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to a restricted area of north Queensland. It is a shrub with lance-shaped leaves with the narrower end towards the base, flowers with five sepals, five white petals and seventeen or eighteen stamens.

Triplarina nowraensis, commonly known as Nowra myrtle heath, is a species of flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to a restricted area of New South Wales. It is a shrub with egg-shaped to lance-shaped leaves with the narrower end towards the base, flowers with five sepals, five cream-coloured to white petals and fifteen to seventeen stamens.

Triplarina paludosa is a species of flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the Blackdown Tableland in Queensland. It is a shrub with lance-shaped to linear leaves, flowers with five sepals, five white petals and fifteen to eighteen stamens.

<i>Triplarina volcanica</i> Species of flowering plant

Triplarina volcanica is a species of flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to Queensland, where it is only found in three mountainous areas. It is a shrub with elliptical to egg-shaped leaves with the narrower end towards the base and flowers with five sepals, five white petals and fourteen to sixteen stamens.

References

  1. 1 2 "Triplarina". Australian Plant Census. Retrieved 13 April 2021.
  2. "Genus Triplarina". PlantNET - New South Wales Flora Online. Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust, Sydney Australia. Retrieved 17 May 2009.
  3. 1 2 Bean, Anthony R. (1995). "Reinstatement and revision of Triplarina Raf. (Myrtaceae)". Austrobaileya. 4: 354–356.
  4. "Triplarina". APNI. Retrieved 13 April 2021.
  5. 1 2 Rafinesque, Constantine S. (1838). Sylva Telluriana. p. 104. Retrieved 13 April 2021.
  6. "Triplarina imbricata". APNI. Retrieved 13 April 2021.
  7. "Triplarina". Australian Plant Census. Retrieved 13 April 2021.