Locule

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A bi-locular and a multi-locular tomato fruit

A locule (plural locules) or loculus (plural loculi) (meaning "little place" in Latin) is a small cavity [1] or compartment within an organ or part of an organism (animal, plant, or fungus).

In angiosperms (flowering plants), the term locule usually refers to a chamber within an ovary (gynoecium or carpel) of the flower and fruits. Depending on the number of locules in the ovary, fruits can be classified as uni-locular (unilocular), bi-locular, tri-locular or multi-locular. The number of locules present in a gynoecium may be equal to or less than the number of carpels. The locules contain the ovules or seeds.

The term may also refer to chambers within anthers containing pollen. [2]

In Ascomycete fungi, locules are chambers within the hymenium in which the perithecia develop. [3]

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References

  1. "Loculus". Oxford Dictionaries. Archived from the original on July 18, 2012.
  2. Hickey, M.; King, C. (2001). The Cambridge Illustrated Glossary of Botanical Terms. Cambridge University Press.
  3. Palaeos: Life Through Deep Time , retrieved 4 May 2016