Triteleia lugens

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Triteleia lugens
Triteleia lugens 2.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Brodiaeoideae
Genus: Triteleia
Species:
T. lugens
Binomial name
Triteleia lugens

Triteleia lugens, the Coast Range triteleia [1] or dark-mouthed triteleia, is a monocot flowering plant in the genus Triteleia . It is endemic to California, where it is known from the Coast Ranges north and south of the San Francisco Bay Area. Its habitat includes forests and chaparral.

Contents

Description

It is a perennial wildflower growing from a corm. It produces two to three basal leaves up to 40 centimeters long by one wide. The inflorescence arises on a smooth, erect stem up to 40 centimeters tall. It is an umbel-like cluster of many funnel-shaped flowers borne on short pedicels.

The flower has six yellow tepals each under a centimeter long. Northern populations have paler yellow flowers, and plants in southern areas have deeper golden yellow flowers. The tepals have dark veins. There are six stamens with yellow or blue anthers.

Related Research Articles

<i>Triteleia</i> Genus of flowering plants

Triteleia is a genus of monocotyledon flowering plants also known as triplet lilies. The 16 species are native to western North America, from British Columbia south to California and east to Wyoming and Arizona, with one species in northwestern Mexico. However they are most common in California. They are perennial plants growing from a fibrous corm, roughly spherical in shape. They get their name from the fact that all parts of their flowers come in threes.

<i>Allium crispum</i> Species of flowering plant

Allium crispum is a species of wild onion known by the common name crinkled onion. It is endemic to California, where it grows along the Central Coast in the Coast Ranges and in the Santa Monica Mountains, often in clays and serpentine soils.

<i>Triteleia ixioides</i> Species of flowering plant

Triteleia ixioides, known as prettyface or golden star, is a monocotyledon flowering plant in the genus Triteleia. It is native to northern and central California and southwestern Oregon, where it can be found in coastal and inland coniferous forests and other habitat. It is a perennial wildflower growing from a corm. It produces one to two basal leaves up to 50 centimeters long by 1.5 wide. The inflorescence arises on an erect stem up to 80 centimeters tall. It is an umbel-like cluster of several flowers each borne on a pedicel up to 7 centimeters long. The flowers are variable in size, measuring one to nearly three centimeters in length. They are pale to bright yellow, or sometimes purple-tinged white. There are six tepals with darker midveins in shades of green, brown, or purple. The lobes are funnel-shaped and may open flat or somewhat reflexed. The six stamens form a fused tube that protrudes from the corolla; they have broad, flat filaments and whitish, yellowish, or blue anthers.

<i>Triteleia lilacina</i> Species of flowering plant

Triteleia lilacina, the foothill triteleia, is a monocot flowering plant in the genus Triteleia.

<i>Triteleia crocea</i> Species of flowering plant

Triteleia crocea, with the common names yellow triteleia and yellow tripletlily, is a monocot flowering plant in the genus Triteleia.

<i>Erythronium oregonum</i> Species of flowering plant

Erythronium oregonum is a North American species of flowering plant in the lily family which is known by the common name giant white fawnlily or Oregon fawn-lily.

<i>Erythronium purpurascens</i> Species of flowering plant

Erythronium purpurascens is a species of flowering plant in the lily family which is known by the common names purple fawn lily and Sierra Nevada fawn lily.

Allium membranaceum is an uncommon species of wild onion known by the common name papery onion. It is endemic to California, where it grows in wooded areas in the southernmost Cascade Range, the northern Coast Ranges, and the Sierra Nevada foothills from Tulare County to Humboldt County. It is found on wooded slopes at elevations of 200–1400 m.

<i>Allium monticola</i> Species of flowering plant

Allium monticola is an uncommon species of wild onion known by the common name San Bernardino Mountain onion. It is endemic to southern California, where it is found in the Transverse Ranges and the northernmost section of the Peninsular Ranges. It has been reported from San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties.

<i>Allium praecox</i> Species of flowering plant

Allium praecox is a species of wild onion known by the common name early onion.

<i>Chlorogalum angustifolium</i> Species of flowering plant

Chlorogalum angustifolium is a species of flowering plant, known by the common name narrowleaf soap plant.

<i>Lilium rubescens</i> Species of lily

Lilium rubescens is an uncommon species of lily known by the common names redwood lily and chaparral lily. It is native to northwestern California and southwestern Oregon, where it is known from the Coast Ranges from Lane County to Santa Cruz Counties.

<i>Sisyrinchium californicum</i>

Sisyrinchium californicum is a species of flowering plant in the iris family known by the common names golden blue-eyed grass, yellow-eyed-grass, and golden-eyed-grass. It is native to the west coast of North America from British Columbia to central California, where it grows in moist habitat, often in coastal areas.

<i>Sisyrinchium elmeri</i>

Sisyrinchium elmeri is a species of flowering plant in the family Iridaceae known by the common name Elmer's blue-eyed grass. It is endemic to California, where it is known from many of the mountain ranges from the Klamath Mountains through the Sierra Nevada to the San Bernardino Mountains. It grows in moist habitat types such as meadows and bogs.

Triteleia dudleyi is a species of flowering plant known by the common name Dudley's triteleia. It is endemic to California, where it is known from sections of the High Sierra Nevada and the Transverse Ranges. It is a plant of subalpine climates, growing in mountain forests. It is a perennial herb growing from a corm. It produces two or three basal leaves up to 30 centimeters long by one wide. The inflorescence arises on an erect stem up to 30 or 35 centimeters tall and bears an umbel-like cluster of many flowers. Each flower is a funnel-shaped yellow bloom that dries purple. The flower has six lobes measuring up to 1.2 centimeters long. There are six stamens with lavender anthers.

<i>Triteleia grandiflora</i> Species of flowering plant

Triteleia grandiflora is a species of flowering plant known by the common names largeflower triteleia, largeflower tripletlily and wild hyacinth. It is native to western North America from British Columbia to extreme northern California, eastward into Idaho, Montana and northern Utah, with disjunct populations occurring in Wyoming and Colorado. Its habitat includes grassland, sagebrush, woodlands, and forests. It is a perennial herb growing from a corm. It produces two or three basal leaves up to 70 centimeters long by one wide. The inflorescence arises on a smooth, erect stem up to 75 centimeters tall and bears an umbel-like cluster of many flowers. Each flower is a funnel-shaped bloom borne on a pedicel up to 4 or 5 centimeters long. The flower may be up to 3.5 centimeters long including the tubular throat and six tepals each just over a centimeter long. The inner set of three tepals are somewhat ruffled and broader than the outer tepals. The flower corolla may be deep blue to almost white with a darker blue mid-vein. There are six stamens with purple or yellow anthers.

<i>Triteleia hyacinthina</i> Species of tree

Triteleia hyacinthina is a species of flowering plant known by the common names white brodiaea, white tripletlily, hyacinth brodiaea, and fool's onion. It is native to western North America from British Columbia to Idaho to central California. Its habitat includes grassland and vernally moist areas such as meadows and vernal pools. It is a perennial herb growing from a corm. It produces two or three basal leaves up to 40 centimeters (16 in) long by 2 centimeters (0.79 in) wide. The inflorescence arises on an erect stem up to 60 centimeters (24 in) tall and bears an umbel-like cluster of many flowers. Each flower is a funnel-shaped bloom borne on a pedicel up to 5 centimeters (2.0 in) long. The flower is white, often tinged purple along the tubular throat, with six green-veined tepals. There are six stamens with white, yellow, or occasionally blue anthers.

<i>Triteleia montana</i> Species of flowering plant

Triteleia montana is a monocot flowering plant in the genus Triteleia. Its common names include Sierra triteleia, and mountain triteleia. It is endemic to California, where it is limited to the Sierra Nevada. It occurs in coniferous forests on granite soils. The Latin specific epithet montana refers to mountains or coming from mountains. It is a perennial wildflower growing from a corm. There are two or three basal leaves measuring up to 30 centimeters long and just a few millimeters wide. The inflorescence arises on an erect, rough-haired stem up to 25 or 30 centimeters tall. It is an umbel-like cluster of several flowers each borne on a pedicel up to 3 centimeters long. The flower is yellow with a dark midvein, and dries purplish. The funnel-shaped corolla is made up of six tepals up to a centimeter long each. There are six stamens with white or blue anthers.

<i>Triteleia peduncularis</i> Species of flowering plant

Triteleia peduncularis is a monocot flowering plant in the genus Triteleia. Its common names include long-ray brodiaea and longray triteleia. It is endemic to California, where it occurs in the coastal and inland mountain ranges of the northern and central sections of the state. It grows in vernally moist habitat such as meadows, grassland, and vernal pools, often in areas with serpentine soils. It is a perennial wildflower growing from a corm. There are two or three basal leaves measuring up to 40 cm (16 in) long and 1.5 cm (0.6 in) wide. The inflorescence arises on a smooth, erect stem up to 80 cm (31 in) tall. It is an umbel-like cluster of several flowers which are borne on very long, straight pedicels measuring up to 18 cm (7.1 in) long. Each funnel-shaped flower is white, often tinged purple, with six tepals up to 1.6 cm (0.6 in) in length. There are six stamens with white anthers, and the ovary at the center is yellow when the flower is fresh.

Erythronium elegans is a rare species of flowering plant in the lily family known by the common names Coast Range fawnlily and elegant fawnlily. It is endemic to Oregon in the United States, where it is known from about 12 occurrences in the northern Coast Range.

References

  1. "Triteleia lugens". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA . Retrieved 16 December 2015.