Tropical Storm Hagibis (2014)

Last updated
Tropical Storm Hagibis
Tropical storm (JMA scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Hagibis Jun 15 2014 0320Z (alternate).jpg
Tropical Storm Hagibis approaching Guangdong Province, China on June 15
FormedJune 13, 2014
DissipatedJune 23, 2014
(Extratropical after June 17)
Highest winds 10-minute sustained: 75 km/h (45 mph)
1-minute sustained: 95 km/h (60 mph)
Lowest pressure985 hPa (mbar); 29.09 inHg
FatalitiesNone
Damage$198 million (2014 USD)
Areas affected
Part of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season

Tropical Storm Hagibis was a tropical storm that, along with the southwest monsoon, brought heavy rainfall to the Philippines for nearly a week in June 2014. The storm formed on June 13 and dissipated on June 18. Hagibis made landfall on June 15, causing damage estimated to be US$198 million. Hagibis is a Filipino word, meaning fast or swiftness.

Contents

Meteorological history

Map plotting the storm's track and intensity, according to the Saffir-Simpson scale

Map key
Saffir-Simpson scale
.mw-parser-output .div-col{margin-top:0.3em;column-width:30em}.mw-parser-output .div-col-small{font-size:90%}.mw-parser-output .div-col-rules{column-rule:1px solid #aaa}.mw-parser-output .div-col dl,.mw-parser-output .div-col ol,.mw-parser-output .div-col ul{margin-top:0}.mw-parser-output .div-col li,.mw-parser-output .div-col dd{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}
.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}
Tropical depression (<=38 mph, <=62 km/h)

Tropical storm (39-73 mph, 63-118 km/h)

Category 1 (74-95 mph, 119-153 km/h)

Category 2 (96-110 mph, 154-177 km/h)

Category 3 (111-129 mph, 178-208 km/h)

Category 4 (130-156 mph, 209-251 km/h)

Category 5 (>=157 mph, >=252 km/h)

Unknown
Storm type
Tropical cyclone
Subtropical cyclone
Extratropical cyclone / Remnant low / Tropical disturbance / Monsoon depression Hagibis 2014 track.png
Map plotting the storm's track and intensity, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale
Map key
  Tropical depression (≤38 mph, ≤62 km/h)
  Tropical storm (39–73 mph, 63–118 km/h)
  Category 1 (74–95 mph, 119–153 km/h)
  Category 2 (96–110 mph, 154–177 km/h)
  Category 3 (111–129 mph, 178–208 km/h)
  Category 4 (130–156 mph, 209–251 km/h)
  Category 5 (≥157 mph, ≥252 km/h)
  Unknown
Storm type
ArrowUp.svg Extratropical cyclone / Remnant low / Tropical disturbance / Monsoon depression

On June 11, 2014, a broad, poorly-defined area of low pressure formed over the South China Sea. Extensive, though disorganized, deep convection accompanied the system. Situated within a region of low to moderate wind shear and weak outflow, slow development ensued. [1] By June 13, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) classified the disturbance as a tropical depression. [2] A monsoonal system, the depression featured an extensive circulation with the strongest winds well away from the center, contrary to most tropical cyclones. A scatterometer pass revealed winds up to 65 km/h (40 mph) within a banding feature to the east of the storm's center by the evening of June 13. [3] In accordance with this, the JMA upgraded the depression to Tropical Storm 1407 and assigned the name Hagibis to the cyclone. [4] Despite the presence of gale-force winds, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) deemed the system to be below storm intensity and only issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert early on June 14, indicating that it was likely to become a tropical cyclone within 24 hours. [5] Thereafter, the tropical storm-force winds contracted to within 130 km (80 mi) of the center, indicative of a more tropical than monsoonal system. As such, the JTWC initiated advisories on the system as Tropical Storm 07W. [6]

Early on June 15, Hagibis made landfall over southern China, and it subsequently weakened to a tropical depression. [7] On the morning of June 16, both agencies issued their final warnings on Hagibis as it weakened further to a land depression. Its remnants still continued to move northward, but by June 17, the remnants of Hagibis curved eastwards due to the jet stream. Later that day, the remnants entered moved back over warm waters, and accompanied by low vertical wind shear, and the storm re-intensified. The JMA upgraded Hagibis to a tropical storm once again, and both the JTWC and the JMA re-initiated advisories on the system. Early on June 18, Hagibis transitioned into an extratropical cyclone, and its circulation was absorbed by a developing extratropical storm to the north on June 21. The system moved out of the basin early on June 23. [8]

Impacts

Tropical Storm Hagibis with the southwest monsoon on June 14 Hagibis Jun 14 2014 0240Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Hagibis with the southwest monsoon on June 14

Philippines

Although Hagibis did not enter the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR), it did threaten the Philippines by enhancing the southwest monsoon, bringing torrential rainfall to the country. Due to extreme rainfall since Tropical Storm Mitag on June 10, the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) declared the official start of the rainy season. [9] [10] It was reported that 17 towns in Maguindanao province were flooded. As a result, a total of more than 90,000 people were affected. [11]

Extreme rainfall continued to affect the country until June 27, when a tropical disturbance affecting northern Luzon ceased.[ citation needed ]

China

Hagibis made landfall over southern China at 04:50 UTC on June 15. Torrential rain continued to bring flooding until June 22, as the southwest monsoon weakened. No people were killed, and total economic losses in Mainland China were counted to be CNY 1.23 billion (US$198 million). [12]

See also

Related Research Articles

2006 Pacific typhoon season

The 2006 Pacific typhoon season was a below-average season that produced a total of 23 named storms, 15 typhoons, and six super typhoons. The season ran throughout 2006, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Chanchu, developed on May 9, while the season's last named storm, Trami, dissipated on December 20. Also, this season was more active, costly, and deadly than the previous season.

2007 Pacific typhoon season

The 2007 Pacific typhoon season was a below average season which featured 24 named storms, fourteen typhoons, and five super typhoons. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season ran throughout 2007, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and November. The season's first named storm, Kong-rey, developed on March 30, while the season's last named storm, Mitag, dissipated on November 27. The season's first typhoon, Yutu, reached typhoon status on May 18, and became the first super typhoon of the year on the next day.

2002 Pacific typhoon season Tropical cyclone season in the Western Pacific Ocean

The 2002 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly above average Pacific typhoon season, producing twenty-six named storms, fifteen becoming typhoons, and eight super typhoons. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season ran throughout 2002, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Tapah, developed on January 11, while the season's last named storm, Pongsona, dissipated on December 11. The season's first typhoon, Mitag, reached typhoon status on March 1, and became the first super typhoon of the year four days later.

2008 Pacific typhoon season

The 2008 Pacific typhoon season was a below average season which featured 22 named storms, eleven typhoons, and two super typhoons. The season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2008, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

2012 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2012

The 2012 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly below average but destructive season, though rather active since 2004. It produced 25 named storms, fourteen typhoons, and four intense typhoons. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season ran throughout 2012, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Pakhar, developed on March 28, while the season's last named storm, Wukong, dissipated on December 29. The season's first typhoon, Guchol, reached typhoon status on June 15, and became the first super typhoon of the year on June 17.

2009 Pacific typhoon season

The 2009 Pacific typhoon season was a below average season that spawned only 22 named storms, 13 typhoons, and five super typhoons. It was also recognized as the deadliest season in the Philippines for decades. The first half of the season was very quiet whereas the second half of the season was extremely active. The season's first named storm, Kujira, developed on May 3 while the season's last named storm, Nida, dissipated on December 3.

2010 Pacific typhoon season

The 2010 Pacific typhoon season was the least active Pacific typhoon season on record, featuring only 14 named storms; seven of them strengthened into typhoons while one reached super typhoon intensity. The Pacific typhoon season during 2010 was in fact less active than the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season, with only two other occurrences of that happening, 2005 and 2020. In the same year, the Pacific hurricane season broke the same record being the least active season on record. During the season, no storms made landfall in mainland Japan, only the second such occurrence since 1988. Also, all of the 14 named storms developed west of 150°E.

Tropical Storm Mujigae (2009)

Tropical Storm Mujigae, known in the Philippines as Tropical Depression Maring was a tropical storm that affected the Philippines, China, Hong Kong, and Vietnam in September 2009.

2011 Pacific typhoon season Review of the weather events

The 2011 Pacific typhoon season was a below average season that produced a total of 21 named storms, 8 typhoons, and four super typhoons. This season was much more active than the previous season, although both seasons were below the Pacific typhoon average of 26. The season ran throughout 2011, though most tropical cyclone tend to develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Aere, developed on May 7 while the season's last named storm, Washi dissipated on December 19.

2013 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2013

The 2013 Pacific typhoon season was the most active Pacific typhoon season since 2004, and the deadliest since 1975. It featured one of the most powerful storms in history. It was an above-average season with 31 named storms, 13 typhoons, and five super typhoons. The season's first named storm, Sonamu, developed on January 4 while the season's last named storm, Podul, dissipated on November 15. Most of the first seventeen named storms before mid-September were relatively weak, as only two of them reached typhoon intensity. Total damage amounted to at least $26.41 billion (USD), making it the third costliest Pacific typhoon season on record; behind 2018 and 2019.

2014 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2014

The 2014 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly below average season, featuring 23 tropical storms, 11 typhoons, 8 super typhoons, and 7 Category 5 typhoons. The season's peak months August and September saw minimal activity caused by an unusually strong and a persistent suppressing phase of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO). The season ran throughout 2014, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season began with the development of Tropical Storm Lingling on January 18, and ended after Tropical Storm Jangmi which dissipated on January 1 of the next year.

2017 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2017

The 2017 Pacific typhoon season was a below-average season in terms of accumulated cyclone energy and the number of typhoons and super typhoons, and the first since the 1977 season to not produce a Category 5-equivalent typhoon on the Saffir–Simpson scale. The season produced a total of 27 named storms, 11 typhoons, and only two super typhoons, making it an average season in terms of storm numbers. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season runs throughout 2017, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Muifa, developed on April 25, while the season's last named storm, Tembin, dissipated on December 26. This season also featured the latest occurrence of the first typhoon of the year since 1998, with Noru reaching this intensity on July 23.

2018 Pacific typhoon season

The 2018 Pacific typhoon season was at the time, the costliest Pacific typhoon season on record, until the record was beaten by the following year. The season was above-average, producing 29 storms, 13 typhoons, and 7 super typhoons. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season ran throughout 2018, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Bolaven, developed on January 3, while the season's last named storm, Man-yi, dissipated on November 28. The season's first typhoon, Jelawat, reached typhoon status on March 29, and became the first super typhoon of the year on the next day.

2019 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2019

The 2019 Pacific typhoon season was the costliest Pacific typhoon season on record, just ahead of the previous year. The season was fairly above-average, producing 29 named storms, 17 typhoons, and five super typhoons. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season ran throughout 2019, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Pabuk, reached tropical storm status on January 1, becoming the earliest-forming tropical storm of the western Pacific Ocean on record, breaking the previous record that was held by Typhoon Alice in 1979. The season's first typhoon, Wutip, reached typhoon status on February 20. Wutip further intensified into a super typhoon on February 23, becoming the strongest February typhoon on record, and the strongest tropical cyclone recorded in February in the Northern Hemisphere. The season's last named storm, Phanfone, dissipated on December 29 after it made landfall in the Philippines. The accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of this season amounted to 269 units.

Tropical Storm Vongfong (2002) Pacific tropical storm in 2002

Tropical Storm Vongfong affected China after a deadly flood season. The 14th named storm of the 2002 Pacific typhoon season, Vongfong developed as a tropical depression on August 10. Initially it was disorganized due to hostile conditions, and it failed to intensify significantly before crossing the Philippine island of Luzon. There, flooding forced 3,500 people to evacuate their homes. In the Philippines, the storm killed 35 people and caused $3.3 million in damage.

Tropical Storm Rumbia (2013)

Severe Tropical Storm Rumbia, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Gorio, was a tropical cyclone that brought widespread flooding in areas of the Philippines and China late June and early July 2013. The sixth internationally named storm of the season, Rumbia formed from a broad area of low pressure situated in the southern Philippine Sea on June 27. Steadily organizing, the initial tropical depression moved towards the northwest as the result of a nearby subtropical ridge. On June 28, the disturbance strengthened to tropical storm strength, and subsequently made its first landfall on Eastern Samar in the Philippines early the following day. Rumbia spent roughly a day moving across the archipelago before emerging into the South China Sea. Over open waters, Rumbia resumed strengthening, and reached its peak intensity with winds of 95 km/h (50 mph) on July 1, ranking it as a severe tropical storm. The tropical cyclone weakened slightly before moving ashore the Leizhou Peninsula late that day. Due to land interaction, Rumbia quickly weakened into a low pressure area on July 2 and eventually dissipated soon afterwards.

Timeline of the 2011 Pacific typhoon season

This timeline documents all of the events of the 2011 Pacific typhoon season, the period that tropical cyclones formed in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2011. Most of the tropical cyclones formed between May and November 2011. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. Tropical storms that form in the entire Western Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Tropical depressions that form in this basin are given a number with a "W" suffix by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines.

Timeline of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season

This timeline documents all of the events of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season. Most of the tropical cyclones forming between May and November. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. Tropical storms that form in the entire Western Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions that form in this basin are given a number with a "W" suffix by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines.

Timeline of the 2012 Pacific typhoon season

This timeline documents all of the events of the 2012 Pacific typhoon season, the period that tropical cyclones formed in the Western Pacific Ocean during 2012. Most of these tropical cyclones formed between May and November 2012. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. Tropical storms that form in the entire Western Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Tropical depressions that form in this basin are given a number with a "W" suffix by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines.

2021 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2021

The 2021 Pacific typhoon season was a below-average season that produced a total of 22 named storms, the least since 2011, 9 typhoons, and five super typhoons. The season's first named storm, Dujuan, developed on February 16, while the last named storm, Rai, dissipated on December 21. The season's first typhoon, Surigae, reached typhoon status on April 16. It became the first super typhoon of the year on the next day, also becoming the strongest tropical cyclone in 2021. Surigae was also the most powerful tropical cyclone on record in the Northern Hemisphere for the month of April. Typhoons In-fa and Rai are responsible for more than half of the total damage this season, adding up to a combined total of $2.017 billion.

References

  1. Significant Tropical Weather Advisory for the Western and South Pacific Oceans. Joint Typhoon Warning Center (Report). United States Navy. June 11, 2014. Archived from the original on June 12, 2014. Retrieved July 26, 2014.
  2. High Seas Warning (Report). Japan Meteorological Agency. June 13, 2014. Archived from the original on June 13, 2014. Retrieved July 26, 2014.
  3. Significant Tropical Weather Advisory for the Western and South Pacific Oceans. Joint Typhoon Warning Center (Report). United States Navy. June 13, 2014. Archived from the original on June 14, 2014. Retrieved July 26, 2014.
  4. "Tropical Storm 1407 (Hagibis) Best Track". Japan Meteorological Agency. July 17, 2014. Retrieved July 26, 2014.
  5. "Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. United States Navy. June 14, 2014. Archived from the original on June 14, 2014. Retrieved July 26, 2014.
  6. Prognostic Reasoning for Tropical Storm 07W (Hagibis) Warning Nr 001. Joint Typhoon Warning Center (Report). United States Navy. June 14, 2014. Archived from the original on June 16, 2014. Retrieved July 26, 2014.
  7. "Tropical storm Hagibis hits Guandong - China" . Retrieved June 15, 2014.
  8. https://www.webcitation.org/6R7wfdAMW?url=http://weather.noaa.gov/pub/data/raw/ax/axpq20.rjtd..txt [ bare URL plain text file ]
  9. "It's official: Wet season is here". Jeannette Andrade. 10 June 2014. Retrieved June 10, 2014.
  10. "Rainy season is here; Signal No. 1 in 3 areas". ABS-CBNnews, Dharel Placido. Retrieved June 10, 2014.
  11. "Floods affect 99k in 17 Maguindanao towns". Joel Locsin/JDS, GMA News. Retrieved July 4, 2014.
  12. "Member Report: China" (PDF). CMA. China Meterelogical Agency. Retrieved October 18, 2014.