University of Central Oklahoma

Last updated
University of Central Oklahoma
University of Central Oklahoma seal.svg
Former names
Territorial Normal School
Central State Normal School
Central State Teachers College
Central State College
Central State University
MottoUbi Motus Est (Latin)
Motto in English
Where Movement Is
Type Public university
EstablishedDecember 24, 1890 (1890-12-24)
AffiliationRegional University System of Oklahoma
Endowment $32.81 million (2017) [1]
President Don Betz
Provost John Barthell
Academic staff
834
Students16,910
Undergraduates 15,067
Postgraduates 1,843
Location, ,
U.S.

35°39′30″N97°28′19″W / 35.65833°N 97.47194°W / 35.65833; -97.47194 Coordinates: 35°39′30″N97°28′19″W / 35.65833°N 97.47194°W / 35.65833; -97.47194
Campus Urban, 210 acres (0.85 km2)
Colors Blue and Bronze [2]
         
Nickname Bronchos
Sporting affiliations
NCAA Division IIMIAA
MascotBuddy Broncho
Website www.uco.edu
University of Central Oklahoma logo.svg

The University of Central Oklahoma, often referred to as UCO or Central, is a coeducational public university located in Edmond, Oklahoma. The university is the third largest in Oklahoma, with more than 17,000 students and approximately 434 full-time and 400 adjunct faculty. Founded in 1890, [3] the University of Central Oklahoma was one of the first institutions of higher learning to be established in what would become the state of Oklahoma, making it one of the oldest universities in the southwest region of the United States. It is home to the American branch of the British Academy of Contemporary Music in downtown Oklahoma City. [4]

A public university is a university that is publicly owned or receives significant public funds through a national or subnational government, as opposed to a private university. Whether a national university is considered public varies from one country to another, largely depending on the specific education landscape.

Edmond, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Edmond is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area in the central part of the state. As of the 2010 census, the population was 81,405, making it the sixth largest city in the state of Oklahoma.

University Academic institution for further education

A university is an institution of higher education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines. Universities typically provide undergraduate education and postgraduate education.

Contents

History

The University of Central Oklahoma was founded on December 24, 1890, when the Territorial Legislature voted to establish the Territorial Normal School, [3] making UCO the oldest public institution of higher education in Oklahoma. Classes were first held in November 1891. By comparison, Oklahoma A&M College (now Oklahoma State University) held its first classes in December 1891 and the University of Oklahoma began in fall 1892. [5] [6] [7]

University of Oklahoma public research university in Norman, Oklahoma, United States

The University of Oklahoma (OU) is a public research university in Norman, Oklahoma. Founded in 1890, it had existed in Oklahoma Territory near Indian Territory for 17 years before the two became the state of Oklahoma. In Fall 2018 the university had 31,702 students enrolled, most at its main campus in Norman. Employing nearly 3,000 faculty members, the school offers 152 baccalaureate programs, 160 master's programs, 75 doctorate programs, and 20 majors at the first professional level.

The Territorial Legislature located the new school in Edmond, provided certain conditions were met. First, Oklahoma County had to donate $5,000 in bonds, and Edmond had to donate 40 acres (160,000 m2) of land within one mile (1.6 km) of the town; the land was eventually donated by Anton Classen. Ten of those acres had to be set aside for the new school. The remaining land had to be divided into lots which would be sold to raise money for the new school. On October 1, 1891 Richard Thatcher was elected the 1st President of Territorial Normal School of Oklahoma. [8]

Richard Thatcher was an American educator, and Civil War veteran. He was a school administrator in Kansas and Oklahoma, hotel operator and the first President of Territorial Normal School, now the University of Central Oklahoma.

The conditions all were met, with the city of Edmond donating an additional $2,000 in bonds. The first class, a group of 23 students, met for the first time Nov. 1, 1891, in the Epworth League Room, located in the unfurnished First Methodist Church. A marker of Oklahoma granite was placed in 1915 near the original site by the Central Oklahoma Normal School Historical Society. It can be seen at Boulevard and Second Street.

Old North was the first building constructed in the summer of 1892 on the campus of what was then Territorial Normal School. It was also the first building constructed in Oklahoma Territory for the purpose of higher education. Occupancy began January 3, 1893. The school first operated as a normal school with two years of college work and a complete preparatory school. In 1897, the first graduating class—two men and three women—received their Normal School diplomas. [9]

Old North Tower, University of Central Oklahoma

Old North Tower is the oldest building on the University of Central Oklahoma campus in Edmond, Oklahoma, and the oldest building of higher education in the state of Oklahoma. Originally built in 1892, it was the first permanent building on the Territorial Normal School campus.

Normal school educational institution to train teachers

A normal school is an institution created to train high school graduates to be teachers by educating them in the norms of pedagogy and curriculum. Most such schools, where they still exist, are now denominated "teacher-training colleges" or "teachers' colleges" and may be organized as part of a comprehensive university. Normal schools in the United States and Canada trained teachers for primary schools, while in continental Europe, the equivalent colleges educated teachers for primary, secondary and tertiary schools.

In 1904, Territorial Normal became Central State Normal School. Statehood was still three years away. On Dec. 29, 1919, the State Board of Education passed a resolution making Central a four-year teachers’ college conferring bachelor's degrees. From 1901 until 1961, Central housed a laboratory school in which local elementary schoolchildren were schooled by Central's faculty and soon-to-be teaching graduates.

University name history [10]
YearsName
1890–1903Territorial Normal School of Oklahoma
1904–1918Central State Normal School
1919–1938Central State Teachers College
1939–1970Central State College
1971–1991Central State University
1991–presentUniversity of Central Oklahoma

Two years later, the Class of 1921 had nine members, the first graduates to receive the four-year degrees. Two decades later, in 1939, the Oklahoma Legislature authorized the institution to grant both Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees. With the expanded offerings came a new name, Central State College.

Oklahoma Legislature

The Legislature of the State of Oklahoma is the state legislative branch of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The Oklahoma House of Representatives and Oklahoma Senate are the two houses that make up the bicameral state legislature. There are 101 state representatives, each serving a two-year term, and 48 state senators, who serve four-year terms that are staggered so only half of the Oklahoma Senate districts are eligible in each election year. Legislators are elected directly by the people from single member districts of equal population. The Oklahoma Legislature meets annually in the Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City.

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

A Bachelor of Science is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for completed courses that generally last three to five years, or a person holding such a degree.

According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, the school was routinely affected by state politics. Presidents and sometimes faculty members, were changed with changes in state governors. In 1950, President Max W. Chambers banned solicitations of campaign donations from faculty members. This resulted in more stability of the school administration. [9]

On March 11, 1941, Central State became part of a coordinated state system of post-secondary education overseen by the Oklahoma Regents for Higher Education, and joined institutions with similar missions as a regional institution.

In 1954, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education gave Central permission to offer the Master of Teaching Degree, which became the Master of Education in 1969. In 1971, the college was authorized to grant the Master of Arts in English and the Master of Business Administration degrees.

On April 13, 1971, the state legislature officially changed the institution's name to Central State University. Old North Tower was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. On May 18, 1990, during the university's Centennial Year, legislation was passed changing the name to the University of Central Oklahoma, though many of the students still refer to the University as "Central", and many alumni as "Central State." [11]

Presidents

Since 1891, the University of Central Oklahoma has had 20 presidents and two acting presidents. [12]

  • Richard Thatcher (1891–1893)
  • George W. Winans (1893–1894)
  • E.R. Williams (1894–1895)
  • Edmund D. Murdaugh (1895–1901)
  • Frederick H. Umholtz (1901–1906)
  • Thomas W. Butcher (1906–1908)
  • James A. McLaughlin (1908–1911)
  • Charles Evans (1911–1916)
  • Grant B. Grumbine (1916–1917)
  • James W. Graves (1917–1919)
  • John G. Michell (1919–1931)
  • Malcom A. Beeson (1931–1935)
  • Cliff R. Otto, Acting (1935)
  • John O. Moseley (1935–1939)
  • Roscoe R. Robinson (1939–1948
  • George P. Huckaby, Acting (1948)
  • W. Max Chambers (1949–1960)
  • Garland Godfrey (1960–1975)
  • Bill J. Lillard (1975–1992)
  • George Nigh (1992–1997)
  • W. Roger Webb (1997–June 30, 2011) [13]
  • Don Betz (August 1, 2011–present)

Academic profile

University rankings
National
Forbes [14] 632
Old North in 2008 Oldnorth4.JPG
Old North in 2008

The University of Central Oklahoma in 2009 was ranked in the top 10% on the Forbes Magazine list of America's Best Colleges [15] out of over 4,000 colleges and universities in the United States. The University of Central Oklahoma School of Music Jazz Division is the largest in the state and one of the largest in the region. [16]

Schools and colleges

UCO is composed of eight schools and colleges:

UCO Jazz Lab

The UCO Jazz Lab is home for the celebrated Jazz Studies Division of the University of Central Oklahoma School of Music. The Jazz Program was started in 1974 by Dr. Kent Kidwell. Since 1974, the Jazz program grew to what it is today. Current Jazz faculty include Lee Rucker (Professor Emeritus), Brian Gorrell, the Head of the Jazz Studies Division, is the director of the 1st Jazz Ensemble. Mr. Gorrell also teaches Applied Saxophone, Applied Jazz Piano and is the Jazz Graduate Advisor. Jeff Kidwell is the director of the 2nd Jazz Ensemble and teaches applied trombone. Other faculty include Clint Rohr, Dr. Ryan Sharp, Dr. Michael Geib, Dr. David Hardman and Zachary Lee.

The UCO Jazz Lab is located on the corner of 5th and Littler St. in Edmond, Oklahoma. The Jazz Lab was built in 2001. It was built with a stage, classrooms, Hideaway Pizza and the Jazz Lab Recording Studio. [17] Students utilize the Jazz Lab on a daily basis. The UCO Jazz Studies Division offers numerous performance ensembles which include: [18]

The School of Music currently offers an undergraduate Minor in Jazz Studies and a Master of Music in Jazz Studies with Majors either in Performance or Commercial Music Production. The UCO Jazz Lab also hosts the annual Recording Technology Workshop and the annual Guitar Techniques Workshop during the summer. The UCO Jazz Ensembles have received many awards. In 2008, The UCO Jazz Ensemble I revived the "Outstanding University Jazz Ensemble" award at the 2006 and 2008 UNT Jazz Festival. [19] In 1983 UCO's Dixieland band was ranked No.1 in the nation [20] and in 1975, UCO Jazz Ensemble I received top honors at the Wichita Jazz Festival and since then, all UCO Jazz Bands have participated in the event.

Since it opened, The Jazz Lab has won "Best Place for Live Music" multiple times in the Edmond Life & Leisure's Reader's Choice annual poll, and has been repeatedly won the award for The Best Live Music Venue in the Oklahoma Gazette’s Best of OKC readers’ poll. The Jazz Lab has featured many famous performers including:

In addition to featuring some of the biggest names in jazz, The UCO Jazz Lab features local and regional musicians from various genres every Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.

UCentral Student Media

UCentral is the student media network at the University of Central Oklahoma, featuring traditional media (television, radio, newspaper) and new media (web, netcasts, social networking) created by students majoring in professional media.

UCentral television programming is available online at ucentralmedia.com and in the city of Edmond, Oklahoma on Cox Cable digital channel 125.

The Vista newspaper, founded in 1903, is distributed free of charge on the UCO campus and designated off-campus locations and also available online at ucentralmedia.com.

The student radio station, UCentral Radio 99.3 FM was awarded an LPFM license by the FCC on September 24, 2015. [21] The station's official call letters are KZUC-LP.

Campus

Academic buildings

The Max Chambers Library Maxchambers1.JPG
The Max Chambers Library
The Liberal Arts Building Libartbuild.jpg
The Liberal Arts Building
The UCO Wellness Center Wellnesscenter1.JPG
The UCO Wellness Center

Other campus buildings

Residential buildings

UCO has five residence halls on campus.

Off-campus buildings

Athletics

UCO participates in intercollegiate athletics in the NCAA at the Division II level and is a member of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA). [23] The university joined the MIAA in 2012; prior to joining the conference, UCO was a member of the Lone Star Conference and was the largest school in the conference. In 2010, it applied to join the MIAA. [24] On July 30, 2010, the conference approved its application to join the conference beginning in the 2012-2013 academic year. [25] Both men's and women's teams are nicknamed the Bronchos. UCO currently competes in baseball, men's and women's basketball, women's cross-country and track and field, football, men's and women's golf, women's soccer, softball, women's tennis, volleyball, wrestling, and women's rowing.

Greek life

UCO is home to 28 Greek organizations.

Notable alumni and faculty

Related Research Articles

Northeastern State University university in Oklahoma, United States

Northeastern State University (NSU) is a public university with its main campus in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The university also has two other campuses in Muskogee and Broken Arrow as well as online. Northeastern is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of Oklahoma as well as one of the oldest institutions of higher learning west of the Mississippi River. Tahlequah is home to the capital of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and about 25 percent of the students at NSU identify themselves as American Indian. The university has many courses focused on Native American linguistics, and offers Cherokee language Education as a major. Cherokee can be studied as a second language, and some classes are taught in Cherokee for first language speakers as well.

Northwest Missouri State University

Northwest Missouri State University is a public university in Maryville, Missouri. Founded in 1905 as a teachers college, its campus is based on the design for Forest Park at the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair and is the official Missouri State Arboretum. The school is governed by a state-appointed Board of Regents and headed by President John Jasinski.

UCentral Radio

UCentral Radio is the student radio station in Edmond, Oklahoma, on the campus of The University of Central Oklahoma. UCentral Radio applied for an LPFM license in November 2013 and was awarded a Construction Permit by FCC on February 24, 2015. It reserved the call letters KZUC. UCentral Radio is part of the UCentral student media network at the University of Central Oklahoma.

Wantland Stadium is the on-campus football facility for the University of Central Oklahoma Bronchos in Edmond, Oklahoma. The official seating capacity of the stadium, following recent renovations, is 10,000, making it tied for the 16th largest Division II stadium, and tied with Walton Stadium of the University of Central Missouri and Francis G. Welch Stadium of Emporia State University for the largest in the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association.

Hamilton Field House is a 3,000 -seat multi-purposee on the campus of the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) in Edmond, Oklahoma, and is home to the Central Oklahoma Bronchos men's and women's basketball teams, as well as volleyball, and wrestling.

UCentral

UCentral is the student media network at the University of Central Oklahoma, featuring traditional media and new media created by students majoring in professional media. UCentral is located within the Mass Communication Department on the campus of UCO.

Central Oklahoma Bronchos

The Central Oklahoma Bronchos, often referred to as Central Oklahoma, Central State or UCO, are the intercollegiate athletic teams representing University of Central Oklahoma, located in Edmond, Oklahoma. The 14 men's and women's varsity teams are called the "Bronchos", with a unique use of the letter H. The school's identification as Bronchos dates back to 1922, when the wife of football coach Charles W. Wantland suggested it for the schools mascot. The official colors of the teams are bronze and blue, which the institution adopted in 1895. The Bronchos compete in the NCAA's Division II and in the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletic Association in all sports except women's rowing, which competes as an independent. The Bronchos have won eighteen national championships, with the most recent coming in 2019 as the women's rowing program won the NCAA Division II Rowing Championship. The university's current athletic director is Eddie Griffin who has served in the position since 2017.

Central Oklahoma Bronchos football

The Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team represents the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) in college football. The team is a member of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA), which is in Division II of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The UCO Bronchos football program began in 1902 and has since compiled over 600 wins, two national championships, and 26 conference championships. As of 2011, the Bronchos were ranked third in NCAA Division II for total wins and ranked 12th in winning percentage (0.621). In 1962, the Bronchos went 11–0 on the season and defeated Lenoir–Rhyne University (NC) 28–13 in the Camellia Bowl to claim its first NAIA national championship. Twenty years later, Central Oklahoma defended its home turf and defeated Colorado Mesa University 14–11 in the NAIA national championship game to take its second title and finish the season with a 10–2 record. Despite its rich history in football, Central Oklahoma has struggled beginning in the late 2000s. The program has not participated in the NCAA Division II playoffs since 2003. The Bronchos play their home games at Wantland Stadium, a 10,000-seat football stadium built in 1965. The Bronchos have enjoyed nine undefeated home seasons and are 5–1 in playoff games at Wantland Stadium.

2013 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team

The 2013 Central Oklahoma football team represented the University of Central Oklahoma during the 2013 NCAA Division II football season, and the 108th season of Broncho football. The Bronchos played their five home games at Wantland Stadium in Edmond, Oklahoma, which had been Central Oklahoma's home stadium since 1965. The 2013 team was coming off a 2-8 record in 2012. The 2013 team was headed by second year head coach Nick Bobeck. 2013 was the Bronchos 2nd as a member of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA).

2012 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team

The 2012 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team represented the University of Central Oklahoma in the 2012 NCAA Division II football season, the 107th season of Broncho football. The team was led by first year head coach and UCO alumn, Nick Bobeck. They played their home games at Wantland Stadium in Edmond, Oklahoma. This was the Bronchos first year as a member of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA).

2011 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team

The 2011 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team represented the University of Central Oklahoma in the 2011 college football season, the 106th season of Broncho football. The team was led by fourth year head coach Tracy Holland. They played their home games at Wantland Stadium in Edmond, Oklahoma. The Bronchos were playing this season as an Independent because they were changing conference membership from the Lone Star Conference to the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association.

Central Oklahoma–Northeastern State football rivalry

The Central Oklahoma–Northeastern State football rivalry, commonly referred to as the Battle for the President's Cup, is an American college football rivalry game played annually between the Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team of the University of Central Oklahoma from Edmond, Oklahoma, and the Northeastern State RiverHawks football team of Northeastern State University from Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Both schools currently compete in the NCAA Division II level, and are members of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA). Central Oklahoma formerly, Central State has a 49–27–2 advantage in the series but Northeastern State has kept the series record close in the trophy years years.

2010 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team

The 2010 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team represented the University of Central Oklahoma in the 2010 NCAA Division II football season, the 105th season of Broncho football. The team was led by fourth year head coach Tracy Holland. They played their home games at Wantland Stadium in Edmond, Oklahoma. The Bronchos were playing this season in their final year of membership in the Lone Star Conference, because they were changing conference affiliation to the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association.

2014 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team

The 2014 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team represented the University of Central Oklahoma during the 2014 NCAA Division II football season, and completed the 109th season of Broncho football. The Bronchos played their six home games at Wantland Stadium in Edmond, Oklahoma, which has been Central Oklahoma's home stadium since 1965. The 2014 team came off a 2-8 record for the second season in a row. The 2014 team was headed by third year head coach Nick Bobeck. 2014 was the Bronchos 3rd as a member of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA). The team finished the regular season with an 8-3 record and made the program's first appearance in the Mineral Water Bowl.

Charles William Wantland was an American athlete and coach. Wantland served as a sports coach and athletic director, and dean at Central State Teachers College in Edmond, Oklahoma.

2016 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team

The 2016 Central Oklahoma Bronchos football team represented the University of Central Oklahoma in the 2016 NCAA Division II football season. The Bronchos played their home games at Wantland Stadium in Edmond, Oklahoma, as they have done since 1965. 2016 was the 110th season in school history. The Bronchos were led by fifth-year head coach, Nick Bobeck. Central Oklahoma has been a member of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association since 2012.

References

  1. As of June 30, 2017. "U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Endowment Market Value and Change in Endowment Market Value from FY2016 to FY2017" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 6, 2018. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  2. UCO Branding Graphic Standard (PDF). January 1, 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04. Retrieved March 23, 2016.
  3. 1 2 "UCO: History of The University of Central Oklahoma". Uco.edu. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  4. Weekend Edition Saturday (August 15, 2009). "A Real-Life School Of Rock". NPR. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  5. "Chronicles of Oklahoma". Digital.library.okstate.edu. 1930-03-01. Retrieved August 2, 2010.
  6. ""University Of Central Oklahoma"". Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Retrieved August 2, 2010.
  7. "National register of historic places". Edmond CVB. Retrieved June 20, 2008.
  8. "UCO Archives - University Time Line". University of Central Oklahoma. Archived from the original on 2015-04-05. Retrieved May 14, 2015.
  9. 1 2 Loughlin, Patricia."University of Central Oklahoma," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Retrieved February 23, 2014.
  10. "UCO Archives". University of Central Oklahoma. Archived from the original on 2015-07-20. Retrieved July 16, 2015.
  11. "History of The University of Central Oklahoma". University of Central Oklahoma. Retrieved March 23, 2015.
  12. "UCO Archives & Special Collections at Chambers Library". uco.edu. Archived from the original on April 5, 2015. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  13. "UCO Archives - UCO President Roger Webb announces retirement".
  14. "America's Top Colleges 2018". Forbes. Retrieved November 19, 2018.
  15. "#419 University of Central Oklahoma". Forbes.com. Retrieved August 2, 2010.
  16. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on January 19, 2009. Retrieved September 29, 2008.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  17. "UCO Jazz Lab Recording Studio". University of Central Oklahoma Jazz Lab. Retrieved May 11, 2008.
  18. "UCO Jazz Lab Education". University of Central Oklahoma Jazz Lab. Retrieved April 19, 2008.
  19. "UCO Jazz Lab". University of Central Oklahoma Jazz Lab. Retrieved April 16, 2008.
  20. "UCO Archive - Timeline". University of Central Oklahoma. Archived from the original on January 31, 2009. Retrieved May 13, 2008.
  21. "KZUC-LP Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division.
  22. "UCO Wantland Hall". University of Central Oklahoma. Retrieved August 20, 2016.
  23. Corbitt, Ken (August 23, 2012). "Newcomers add strength to rugged MIAA". The Topeka Capital-Journal . Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  24. Toppmeyer, Blake (July 6, 2010). "Commentary: What a 16-member MIAA would mean - Maryville, MO". Maryville Daily Forum. Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. Retrieved August 2, 2010.
  25. Toppmeyer, Blake. "MIAA adds 2, more on horizon - Maryville, MO". Maryville Daily Forum. Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. Retrieved August 2, 2010.