(I've Got) Beginner's Luck

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"(I've Got) Beginner's Luck"
Song by Fred Astaire
B-side "They Can't Take That Away from Me"
PublishedFebruary 27, 1937 (1937-02-27) by Gershwin Publishing Corp., New York [1]
ReleasedApril 1937 [2]
RecordedMarch 18, 1937 (1937-03-18) [3]
Studio Los Angeles, California
Genre Jazz, Pop Vocal
Label Brunswick 7855 [4]
Composer(s) George Gershwin
Lyricist(s) Ira Gershwin
Fred Astaire singles chronology
"Never Gonna Dance"
(1936)
"(I've Got) Beginner's Luck"
(1937)
"They All Laughed"
(1937)

"(I've Got) Beginner's Luck" is a song composed by George Gershwin, with lyrics by Ira Gershwin, written for the 1937 film Shall We Dance , it was introduced by Fred Astaire. [5] It is a brief comic tap solo with cane where Astaire's rehearsing to a record of the number is cut short when the record gets stuck. Astaire's commercial recording for Brunswick (No. 7855) was very popular in 1937. [6]

Other notable recordings

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. Library of Congress. Copyright Office. (1937). Catalog of Copyright Entries 1937 Musical Compositions New Series Vol 32 Pt 3 For the Year 1937. United States Copyright Office. U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
  2. "Cover versions of They Can't Take That Away from Me by Fred Astaire with Johnny Green and His Orchestra | SecondHandSongs". secondhandsongs.com. Retrieved 2021-08-04.
  3. "BRUNSWICK 78rpm numerical listing discography: 7500 - 8000". www.78discography.com. Retrieved 2022-03-20.
  4. Fred Astaire – They Can't Take That Away From Me / Beginner's Luck (1937, Shellac) , retrieved 2021-08-04
  5. Gilbert, Steven E. (1995). The Music of Gershwin. New Haven: Yale University Press. p. 6. ISBN   0300062338.
  6. Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research Inc. p. 37. ISBN   0-89820-083-0.