1896 in film

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The following is an overview of the events of 1896 in film, including a list of films released and notable births.

Contents

List of years in film
In music
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899

Events

Ad for Vitascope Hall, New Orleans, offering "an entirely new series of pictures". Vitascope Hall Daily Picayune NOLA 31 July 1896.png
Ad for Vitascope Hall, New Orleans, offering "an entirely new series of pictures".

Notable films released in 1896

Alexandre Promio

The pioneer filmmaker, Alice Guy, debuted this year. Alice Guy.jpg
The pioneer filmmaker, Alice Guy, debuted this year.

Alice Guy-Blaché

Birt Acres

Maybe a surviving print of the film Arrival of a Train at Vincennes Station. Melies Arrival of a Train at Vincennes Station.jpg
Maybe a surviving print of the film Arrival of a Train at Vincennes Station.
Screenshot of A Nightmare. Melies, Le cauchemar (Star Film 82, 1896).jpg
Screenshot of A Nightmare.

Gabriel Veyre

Georges Méliès

Louis Lumière

Contrary to myth, Arrival Of A Train At La Ciotat it was not shown at the Lumieres' first public film screening on 28 December 1895 in Paris, France: the programme of ten films shown that day makes no mention of it. Its first public showing took place in January 1896. L'Arrivee d'un train en gare de La Ciotat.jpg
Contrary to myth, Arrival Of A Train At La Ciotat it was not shown at the Lumières' first public film screening on 28 December 1895 in Paris, France: the programme of ten films shown that day makes no mention of it. Its first public showing took place in January 1896.

M.H. Laddé

Robert W. Paul

William Heise

The first kiss ever on film is in 1896 involving the great Canadian star May Irwin and John C. Rice. The Kiss 1896 Film Strip.jpg
The first kiss ever on film is in 1896 involving the great Canadian star May Irwin and John C. Rice.

William K.L. Dickson

Others

Births

Lilyan Tashman was an American vaudeville, Broadway, and film actress. Lilyantashman.jpg
Lilyan Tashman was an American vaudeville, Broadway, and film actress.
MonthDateNameCountryProfessionDied
January20 George Burns USActor, Comedian 1996
20 Rolfe Sedan USActor 1982
20 Isabel Withers USActress 1968
March3 Willie Fung ChinaActor 1945
April8 Einar Juhl DenmarkActor 1982
26 Ruut Tarmo EstoniaActor 1967
May16 Gilda Langer GermanyActress 1920
17 Ruth Donnelly USActress 1982
June28 Constance Binney USActress, Singer, Dancer 1989
July16 Evelyn Preer USActress, Singer 1932
25 Jack Perrin USActor 1967
August14 Theodor Luts EstoniaDirector, Cinematographer 1980
18 Jack Pickford CanadaActor 1933
30 Raymond Massey CanadaActor 1983
October1 Abraham Sofaer USActor 1988
6 David Howard USDirector 1941
23 Lilyan Tashman USActress 1934
30 Rex Cherryman USActor 1928
November16 Lawrence Tibbett USActor, Singer 1960
December10 Torsten Bergström SwedenActor, Director 1948

Debut

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The following is an overview of the events of 1895 in film, including a list of films released and notable births.

The following is an overview of the events of 1897 in film, including a list of films released and notable births.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kinetoscope</span> Motion picture exhibition device

The Kinetoscope is an early motion-picture exhibition device. The Kinetoscope was designed for films to be viewed by one person at a time through a peephole viewer window at the top of the device. The Kinetoscope was not a movie projector, but it introduced the basic approach that would become the standard for all cinematic projection before the advent of video. It created the illusion of movement by conveying a strip of perforated film bearing sequential images over a light source with a high-speed shutter. A process using roll film was first described in a patent application submitted in France and the U.S. by French inventor Louis Le Prince. The concept was also used by U.S. inventor Thomas Edison in 1889, and subsequently developed by his employee William Kennedy Laurie Dickson between 1889 and 1892. Dickson and his team at the Edison lab also devised the Kinetograph, an innovative motion picture camera with rapid intermittent, or stop-and-go, film movement, to photograph movies for in-house experiments and, eventually, commercial Kinetoscope presentations.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">J. Stuart Blackton</span> American film producer (1875–1941)

James Stuart Blackton was a British-American film producer and director of the silent era. One of the pioneers of motion pictures, he founded Vitagraph Studios in 1897. He was one of the first filmmakers to use the techniques of stop-motion and drawn animation, is considered a father of American animation, and was the first to bring many classic plays and books to the screen. Blackton was also the commodore of the Motorboat Club of America and the Atlantic Yacht Club.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Charles Francis Jenkins</span> American cinema pioneer

Charles Francis Jenkins was an American engineer who was a pioneer of early cinema and one of the inventors of television, though he used mechanical rather than electronic technologies. His businesses included Charles Jenkins Laboratories and Jenkins Television Corporation. Over 400 patents were issued to Jenkins, many for his inventions related to motion pictures and television.

Thomas J. Armat was an American mechanic and inventor, a pioneer of cinema best known through the co-invention of the Edison Vitascope.

Biograph Company Defunct American film studio

The Biograph Company, also known as the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, was a motion picture company founded in 1895 and active until 1916. It was the first company in the United States devoted entirely to film production and exhibition, and for two decades was one of the most prolific, releasing over 3000 short films and 12 feature films. During the height of silent film as a medium, Biograph was America's most prominent film studio and one of the most respected and influential studios worldwide, only rivaled by Germany's UFA, Sweden's Svensk Filmindustri and France's Pathé. The company was home to pioneering director D. W. Griffith and such actors as Mary Pickford, Lillian Gish, and Lionel Barrymore.

Vitascope

Vitascope was an early film projector first demonstrated in 1895 by Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat. They had made modifications to Jenkins' patented Phantoscope, which cast images via film and electric light onto a wall or screen. The Vitascope is a large electrically-powered projector that uses light to cast images. The images being cast are originally taken by a kinetoscope mechanism onto gelatin film. Using an intermittent mechanism, the film negatives produced up to fifty frames per second. The shutter opens and closes to reveal new images. This device can produce up to 3,000 negatives per minute. With the original Phantoscope and before he partnered with Armat, Jenkins displayed the earliest documented projection of a filmed motion picture in June 1894 in Richmond, Indiana.

William Selig American film pioneer

William Nicholas Selig was a pioneer of the American motion picture industry. In 1896 he created one of the first film production companies, Selig Polyscope Company of Chicago. Selig claimed to have made the first narrative film shot in Los Angeles, The Count of Monte Cristo, and, in 1909, what may have been the first permanent L.A. studio, in Edendale, Los Angeles. He also produced the first Wizard of Oz film in 1910, the first U.S. company to shoot a two-reel film, Damon and Pythias (1908), and the first true serial, The Adventures of Kathlyn (1913-1914).

Selig Polyscope Company American motion picture company

The Selig Polyscope Company was an American motion picture company that was founded in 1896 by William Selig in Chicago. The company produced hundreds of early, widely distributed commercial moving pictures, including the first films starring Tom Mix, Harold Lloyd, Colleen Moore, and Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle. Selig Polyscope also established Southern California's first permanent movie studio, in the historic Edendale district of Los Angeles. Ending film production in 1918, the business, based on its film production animals, became an animal and prop supplier to other studios and a zoo and amusement park attraction in East Los Angeles until the Great Depression in the 1930s.

Edison Studios Defunct American film production organization (1894–1918)

Edison Studios was an American film production organization, owned by companies controlled by inventor and entrepreneur, Thomas Edison. The studio made close to 1,200 films, as part of the Edison Manufacturing Company (1894–1911) and then Thomas A. Edison, Inc. (1911–1918), until the studio's closing in 1918. Of that number, 54 were feature length, and the remainder were shorts. All of the company's films have fallen into the public domain because they were released before 1925.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Actuality film</span> Non-fiction film genre that uses footage of real events

The actuality film is a non-fiction film genre that, like the documentary film, uses footage of real events, places, and things. Unlike the documentaries, actuality films are not structured into a larger argument, picture of the phenomenon or coherent whole. In practice, actuality films preceded the emergence of the documentary. During the era of early cinema, actualities—usually lasting no more than a minute or two and usually assembled together into a program by an exhibitor—were just as popular and prominent as their fictional counterparts. The line between "fact" and "fiction" was not as sharply drawn in early cinema as it would become after the documentary came to serve as the predominant non-fiction filmmaking form. An actuality film is not like a newspaper article so much as it is like the still photograph that is published along with the article, with the major difference being that it moves. Apart from the traveling actuality genre, actuality is one film genre that remains strongly related to still photography.

The decade of the 1890s in film involved some significant events.

Koster and Bials Music Hall New York City vaudeville theatre

Koster and Bial's Music Hall was an important vaudeville theatre in New York City, located at Broadway and Thirty-Fourth Street, where Macy's flagship store now stands. It had a seating capacity of 3,748, twice the size of many theaters. Ticket prices ranged from 25¢ for a seat in the gallery to $1.50 for one in the orchestra. The venue was founded by John Koster (1844-1895) and Albert Bial (1842-1897) in the late 19th century and closed in 1901.

Phantoscope

The Phantoscope was a film projection machine, a creation of Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat. In the early 1890, Jenkins began creating the projector. He later met Thomas Armat, who provided financial backing and assisted with necessary modifications.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Manuel Trujillo Durán</span> Venezuelan filmmaker

Manuel Trujillo Durán was a Venezuelan photographer who pioneered film in Venezuela. Trujillo was most successful as a photographer, though he dabbled in other industries and is best remembered for his connections to the fledgling film industry in Venezuela. He became one of the first people from Latin America to learn how to show films; he was thought for many years to be the director of Venezuela's first films, and traveled through Venezuela and Colombia with projectors to introduce cinema to this part of the South American continent.

Raff & Gammon Film distribution company in the silent film era

Norman C. Raff and Frank R. Gammon were two American businessmen who were known for distributing and promoting some of the Edison Studio films, and founding their own business, which was called The Kinetoscope Company.

References

  1. "Birt Acres". EarlyCinema.com. Retrieved 2011-08-15.
  2. Mast, Gerald; Kawin, Bruce F., eds. (2007). "Birth". A Short History of the Movies (abridged 9th ed.). Pearson Education. ISBN   9780321418210.
  3. "Zulia Monuments: Teatro Baralt". Institutional Assets and Monuments of Venezuela (in Spanish). 2016-08-04. Retrieved 2019-09-19.
  4. Workman, Christopher; Howarth, Troy (2016). Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the Silent Era. Midnight Marquee Press. p. 14. ISBN   978-1936168-68-2.
  5. Malthête, Jacques; Mannoni, Laurent (2008), L'oeuvre de Georges Méliès, Paris: Éditions de La Martinière, p. 337, ISBN   9782732437323