1931 in film

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The following is an overview of 1931 in film, including significant events, a list of films released and notable births and deaths.

Contents

Top-grossing films (U.S.)

The top ten 1931 released films by box office gross in North America are as follows:

Highest-grossing films of 1931
RankTitleStudioBox office gross rental
1 Trader Horn Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer $1,642,000 [1]
2 Palmy Days United Artists/Samuel Goldwyn Productions $1,601,000 [2]
3 City Lights United Artists$1,500,000 [3]
4 The Man Who Came Back Fox Film Corporation $1,400,000 [3]
5 Merely Mary Ann $1,300,000 [3]
6 Arrowsmith United Artists/Samuel Goldwyn Productions$1,250,000 [4]
7 A Connecticut Yankee Fox Film Corporation$1,200,000 [4]
8 Cimarron RKO Radio Pictures $1,122,000 [5]
9 Bad Girl Fox Film Corporation$1,100,000 [3]
10 Possessed Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer$1,030,000 [1]

Events

Best money stars

Variety reported the following as the biggest male stars in the U.S. in alphabetical order although grouped George Arliss and Ronald Colman together as having equal ranking. [9]

Actor
George Arliss

Ronald Colman

Wallace Beery
Maurice Chevalier
Clark Gable
Edward G. Robinson
Will Rogers

The following were the biggest women names in the U.S. in alphabetical order but again grouped two actresses together to denote they were ranked the same. [9]

Actress
Constance Bennett
Joan Crawford
Marlene Dietrich
Greta Garbo

Marie Dressler

Janet Gaynor
Norma Shearer

Academy Awards

The 4th Academy Awards were awarded to films completed and screened released between August 1, 1930, and July 31, 1931, by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Most Nominations: Cimarron (RKO Pictures) – 7

Major Awards

Most Awards: Cimarron – 3 (Best Picture; Best Adaptation and Best Art Direction)

Cimarron was the first Western to win Best Picture, and would remain the only one to do so for 59 years (until Dances with Wolves won in 1991). It received a then-record seven nominations, and was the first film to win more than two awards.

The 5th Academy Awards were conducted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on November 18, 1932, [10] at a ceremony held at The Ambassador Hotel [10] in Los Angeles, California. The ceremony was hosted by Conrad Nagel. [10] Films screened in Los Angeles between August 1, 1931, and July 31, 1932, were eligible to receive awards. [10]

Most nominations: Arrowsmith (Samuel Goldwyn Productions) and The Champ (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) – 4

Major Awards

Most Awards: Bad Girl (Best Director and Best Adaptation) and The Champ (Best Actor and Best Original Story) – 2 Note: The Academy Award for Best Picture went to 1932's Grand Hotel .

1931 film releases

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Notable films released in 1931

United States unless stated

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Writers: John Farrow (adapted from the play: "The Registered Woman"), John Farrow Stars: Helen Twelvetrees, William Bakewell, Lew Cody

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Serials

Short film series

Animated short film series

Births

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Film debuts

Related Research Articles

<i>The Champ</i> (1931 film) 1931 film

The Champ is a 1931 American pre-Code film starring Wallace Beery and Jackie Cooper and directed by King Vidor from a screenplay by Frances Marion, Leonard Praskins and Wanda Tuchock. The picture tells the story of a washed-up alcoholic boxer (Beery) attempting to put his life back together for the sake of his young son (Cooper).

Wallace Beery American actor

Wallace Fitzgerald Beery was an American film and stage actor. He is best known for his portrayal of Bill in Min and Bill (1930) opposite Marie Dressler, as Long John Silver in Treasure Island (1934), as Pancho Villa in Viva Villa! (1934), and his titular role in The Champ (1931), for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor. Beery appeared in some 250 films during a 36-year career. His contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer stipulated in 1932 that he would be paid $1 more than any other contract player at the studio. This made Beery the highest-paid film actor in the world during the early 1930s. He was the brother of actor Noah Beery and uncle of actor Noah Beery Jr.

Richard Dix Actor

Richard Dix was an American motion picture actor who achieved popularity in both silent and sound film. His standard on-screen image was that of the rugged and stalwart hero. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor for his lead role in the Best Picture-winning epic Cimarron (1931).

<i>Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde</i> (1931 film) 1931 film by Rouben Mamoulian

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a 1931 American pre-Code horror film, directed by Rouben Mamoulian and starring Fredric March, who plays a possessed doctor who tests his new formula that can unleash people's inner demons. The film is an adaptation of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, the 1886 Robert Louis Stevenson tale of a man who takes a potion which turns him from a mild-mannered man of science into a homicidal maniac.

The year 1946 in film involved some significant events.

The year 1944 in film involved some significant events, including the wholesome, award-winning Going My Way plus popular murder mysteries such as Double Indemnity, Gaslight and Laura.

The year of 1942 in film involved some significant events, in particular the release of a film consistently rated as one of the greatest of all time, Casablanca.

The year 1938 in film involved some significant events.

The year 1937 in film involved some significant events, including the Walt Disney production of the first American full-length animated film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

The following is an overview of 1936 in film, including significant events, a list of films released and notable births and deaths.

The cinema releases of 1935 were highly representative of the early Golden Age period of Hollywood. This period was punctuated by performances from Clark Gable, Shirley Temple, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, and the first teaming of Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy. A significant number of productions also originated in the UK film industry. It was also a period notable in Soviet Russia for the increasing amount of state control exercised over their film industry.

The following is an overview of 1934 in film, including significant events, a list of films released and notable births and deaths.

The following is an overview of 1933 in film, including significant events, a list of films released, and notable births and deaths.

The following is an overview of 1932 in film, including significant events, a list of films released and notable births and deaths.

The following is an overview of 1930 in film, including significant events, a list of films released and notable births and deaths.

The following is an overview of 1929 in film, including significant events, a list of films released and notable births and deaths.

The following is an overview of 1928 in film, including significant events, a list of films released and notable births and deaths. Although some movies released in 1928 had sound, most were still silent.

The following is an overview of 1927 in film, including significant events, a list of films released and notable births and deaths.

<i>Cimarron</i> (1931 film) 1931 film

Cimarron is a 1931 pre-Code epic Western film directed by Wesley Ruggles, starring Richard Dix and Irene Dunne, and featuring Estelle Taylor and Roscoe Ates. The Oscar-winning script was written by Howard Estabrook based on the 1930 Edna Ferber novel Cimarron. It would be RKO's most expensive production up to that date, and its winning of the top Oscar for Best Production would be only one of two ever won by that studio. It is also one of the few Westerns to ever win the top honor at the Academy Awards. Epic in scope, spanning forty years from 1889 to 1929, it was a critical success, although it did not recoup its production costs during its initial run in 1931.

4th Academy Awards Award ceremony presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences for achievement in filmmaking in 1930/1931

The 4th Academy Awards were awarded to films completed and screened released between August 1, 1930, and July 31, 1931, by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. At the ceremony, nine-year-old Jackie Cooper, nominated for Best Actor in Skippy, fell asleep on the shoulder of Best Actress nominee Marie Dressler. When Dressler was announced as the winner, Cooper had to be eased onto his mother’s lap.

References

Citations
  1. 1 2 The Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles, California: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study.
  2. Jones, Lon (March 4, 1944). "Which Cinema Films Have Earned the Most Money Since 1914?". The Argus . Melbourne. p. 3 Supplement: The Argus Weekend magazine. Retrieved August 6, 2012 via National Library of Australia.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Finler 2003, pp. 356-357.
  4. 1 2 Quigley Publishing Company "The All Time Best Sellers", International Motion Picture Almanac 1937-38 (1938) (pg. 942); accessed April 19, 2014
  5. "All-Time Film Rental Champs". Variety . October 15, 1990. p. M150.
  6. "Att'y Gen Scans R-K-O-Pathe Deal on Plea of Defeated Insurgents". Variety . January 7, 1931. p. 3. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  7. Ships of Hate at the American Film Institute Catalog
  8. 1 2 3 Ten Leading Events in the News of Motion Pictures During the Year 1931. The Film Daily Yearbook 1932. p. 9. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  9. 1 2 "Six Best Money Stars". Variety. January 5, 1932. p. 1.
  10. 1 2 3 4 "The 5th Academy Awards – 1933". Archived from the original on 2012-09-04.
Bibliography