1973 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

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All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1973
Championship Details
Dates Sept 16
Counties
Sponsor
All Ireland Champions
Winners Cork (10th title)
Captain Marie Costine
Manager Mary Moran
All-Ireland Runners-up
Runners-up Antrim
Captain Mairéad McAtamney
Manager
Matches played 7

The 1973 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1973 season. The championship was won by Cork who defeated Antrim by a single point margin in the final for their fourth successive success. [1] The match drew an attendance of 4,000. [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Contents

Semi-finals

Antrim seemed to have taken a firm grip of the semi-final when Chris O'Boyle, who had just come on as substitute, got a goal to put them seven points clear near the interval. This setback roused Wexford who retaliated with a well taken goal by Mary Sheil but still trailed by 1-5 to 1-1 at half time. Marking as far closer in the second half.

Final

After a match marred by heavy rain, Antrim failed in a dramatic bid for an equaliser at the end of the final. Agnes Hourigan wrote in the Irish Press:

Úna Uí Phuirséil was the 17th president of the Camogie Association. Born Agnes Hourigan in Ballingarry, County Limerick, she had three brothers, Dan, Sean, Fr Jack Hourigan, and four sisters [including Maisie and Ellen].

Over the 50 minutes Antrim had slightly the better of the play territorially and missed many second half scoring chance, were desperately unlucky not to snatch a draw in the dying seconds. Cork seemed to have the tenth title wrapped up when Ann Phelan goalled just three minutes from time and Marion McCarthy promptly pointed a 30 with just over two minute remaining to put the holders four points clear after Antrim had leveled the scores in a great rally. Then the Ulster champions came again. Mairéad McAtamney shot low from a free. The ball was diverted out for a 30, which the Antrim captain took and crashed the ball to the back of the Cork net, to reduce the margin to a point with the last minute ticking away. Back came Antrim in a last attack. Full forward Lily Scullion seemed to be brought down in possession, but instead of awarding a free referee Phyllis Breslin, who was right on the spot, threw in the ball. A Cork back cleared to touch. Mairéad McAtamney took the line ball about 25 yards out and sent it sailing for the Cork posts but the leather went inches wide in that brave bid for the balancing point, the long whistle blew on the puckout and Cork were champions again. [7] <

Assessment

Both teams were evenly matched throughout the field. The Irish Independent noted:

<i>Irish Independent</i> newspaper

The Irish Independent is Ireland's largest-selling daily newspaper, published by Independent News & Media (INM). It often includes glossy magazines. While most of the paper's content in English, it also publishes a weekly supplement in Irish called Seachtain. The Irish Independent's sister publication is the Sunday Independent.

Fast, spectacular, open camogie, fine striking and superb ball control by both side were features of the final.

The Irish Times reported:

Form start to finish, the crowd was spellbound by the play of both sides and it was a pity that one of them had to lose.

Agnes Hourigan wrote in the Irish Press:

The players managed to continue to serve up brilliant camogie even as the ball and the pitch became slippery. Had the rain not come just five minutes before the interval, this must surely have gone on record as the greatest camogie final ever played. [8]

Antrim were the last team to wear the old style tunic in a major final. Cork were the first county to win the senior and junior finals on the same day. Cally Riordan (Youghal) won medals with both teams, playing on the junior team and coming on as a sub for the seniors.

Final stages

Antrim 1-8 – 1-4 Wexford

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Cork
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Antrim
CORK:
GK 1 Deirdre Sutton (Glen Rovers)
FB 2 Marie Costine (Cloyne) (Capt)
RWB 3 Hannah Dineen -Cotter (South Pres)
CB 4 Sheila Dunne (Canovee)
LWB 5 Mary Whelton (South Pres)
MF 6 Marion McCarthy (South Pres) (0-3)
MF 7 Pat Moloney (UCC)
MF 8 Betty Sugrue (South Pres)
RWF 9 Anne Comerford-Phelan (Watergrasshill) (2-1)
CF 10 Marion Sweeney (Youghal) (0-1)
LWF 11 Nuala Guilly (Cloyne) Sub off.svg 45'
FF 12 Rosie Hennessy UCC)
Substitutes:
CB Cally Riordan (0-1) for Guilly Sub on.svg 45'
(ANTRIM):
GK 1 Sue McLarnon
FB 2 Kathleen Kelly
RWB 3 Josephine Maguire
CB 4 Mairéad Diamond
LWB 5 Jo McClements
MF 6 Rita McAteer
MF 7 Sue Cashman (0-1)
MF 8 Mairéad McAtamney (Capt) (1-0)
RWF 9 Chris O'Boyle (1-0)
CF 10 Bernie Dixon
LWF 11 Nuala Havelin
FF 12 Lily Scullion (1-0)

MATCH RULES

See also

All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship

The GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship, known simply as the All-Ireland Championship, is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county hurling competition in Ireland, and has been contested every year except one since 1887.

National Camogie League

The National Camogie League, known for sponsorship reasons as the Littlewoods Ireland Camogie Leagues, is the second most important competition in the Irish team sport of camogie, played exclusively by women. The competition is held in three divisions graded by ability. It was first played in 1976 for a trophy donated by Allied Irish Banks when Tipperary beat Wexford in a replayed final. Division Two was inaugurated in 1979 and won by Kildare.

Related Research Articles

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

The 1978 All Ireland Camogie Championship was won by Cork, who beat Dublin by 17 points in the final. It was the last final to be played using the second crossbar.

The 1972 All Ireland Camogie Championship was won by Cork who defeated Killkenny by a four margin in the final for their third successive success of a four-in-a-row. It was the first final in which the new look camogie uniform of the 1970s was used. The match drew an attendance of 4,000. It marked the first appearance in a final of the 15-year-old Angela Downey, arguably the greatest player in the history of camogie.

The 2007 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the Gala All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasons—was the high point of the 2007 season in the sport of camogie. The championship was won by Wexford who defeated Cork by a two-point margin in the final thanks to two first-half goals by ‘player of the match’ Una Leacy. The final attracted a record attendance of 33,154.

The 1995 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the Bórd na Gaeilge All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasons—was the high point of the 1995 season. The championship was won by Cork who defeated Killkenny by a four-point margin in the final, taking the lead for only the first time in the match with a goal by Linda Mellerick that dropped into the net from a long shot with just 30 seconds of normal time left. The match drew an attendance of 9,874, then the highest for a camogie-only final, beating the 52-year-old attendance record set for Dublin v Cork in 1943. Lynn Dunlea scored 4-20 in the championship.

The 1961 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1961 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Tipperary by a ten-point margin in the final.

The 1957 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1957 season in camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final thus gaining revenge for Antrim's semi-final victory of the previous year that interrupted would have been a sequence of 19 All-Ireland championships in a row by Dublin.

The 1962 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1962 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Galway by a 14-point margin in the final.

The 1975 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1975 season in the sport of camogie. The championship was won by Wexford who defeated Cork by a surprising ten point margin in the final, Cork having defeated reigning champions Kilkenny in the semi-final.

The 1981 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1981 season. The championship was won by Killkenny who defeated Cork by a five-point margin in a replayed final. The match drew an attendance of 3,000.

The 1974 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1974 season. The championship was won by Kilkenny who defeated Cork by a four-point margin in the final for a historic first success. The match was replayed, the third time this had happened in a final in the history of camogie.

The 1971 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1971 season. The championship was won by Cork, who defeated Wexford by a 13-point margin in the final. The match drew an attendance of 4,000.

The 1970 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1970 season. The championship was won by Cork, who defeated Killkenny by an 11-point margin in the final. The match drew an attendance of 4,000.

The 1969 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1969 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Wexford who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final.

The 1968 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1968 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Wexford who defeated Cork by a three-point margin in the final.

The 1967 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1967 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Antrim who defeated Dublin by a four-point margin in the final, which went to a replay. It ended a remarkable record of 18 All Ireland titles in 19 years by Dublin, an eight-in-row 1948-‘55 and a ten-in-a-row 1957-’66.

The 1966 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1966 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final. The semi-final between Dublin and Tipperary ranks 1alongside the disputed semi-final of 1947 between Dublin and Galway as the most controversial in camogie history.

The 1956 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1956 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Antrim who defeated Cork by a four-point margin in the final, having created a major surprise by defeating serial champions Dublin in the semi-final, and interrupting what would otherwise have been a run of 19 championships in a row by Dublin. The championship featured what were reportedly two of the best camogie matches in the history of the game in its 12-a-side phase, the final and the semi-final between Antrim and Dublin.

The 1973 All-Ireland Senior Club Camogie Championship for the leading clubs in the women's team field sport of camogie was won by Oranmore (Gal), who defeated St Paul’s (Kk) in the final, played at Nowlan Park.

References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5
  2. Report of final in Irish Press, September 17, 1973
  3. Report of final in Irish Independent, September 17, 1973
  4. Report of final in Irish Times, September 17, 1973
  5. Report of final in Irish Examiner, September 17, 1973
  6. Report of final in Irish News, September 17, 1973
  7. Report of final in Irish Press, September 17, 1973
  8. Report of final in Irish Press, September 17, 1973
Preceded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1972
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932 – present
Succeeded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1974