1958 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

Last updated
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1958
Championship Details
Dates
Counties
Sponsor
All Ireland Champions
Winners Dublin (17th title)
Captain Kathleen Mills
Manager Nell McCarthy
All-Ireland Runners-up
Runners-up Tipperary
Alice Hanley
Manager Bernie Sands
Matches played

The 1958 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1958 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Tipperary by a 15-point margin in the final. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Contents

Championship

Tipeprary were trained by 1930s hurler Bernard Sands. Mary England Kathleen Downes, Kathleen Griffin (two each), Edie Merrigan and Breda Scully scored in Tipperary's dramatic eight goals to 5-1 emi-final victory over Antrim at Roscrea. The match produced such a high standard of hurling that the spectators were applauding for most of the game, the Nenagh Guardian reported. Galway described the semi-final encounter as its biggest ever camogie fixture.

Kathleen Marks born in 1935 is a former camogie player, who played for Tipperary in four All Ireland Camogie Championship finals without achieving the long-awaited breakthrough for Tipperary.

The Nenagh Guardian is a weekly local newspaper that circulates in County Tipperary, Ireland. The newspaper is based in Nenagh, County Tipperary but is printed by the Limerick Leader in Limerick. The title incorporates two previous local papers, the Tipperary Vindicator and the Nenagh News.

Final

The final was played after the Tipperary v Kilkenny hurling semi-final with some 6-7,000 of the 53,357 attendance staying on to view the camogie match. Financial restraints prevented Tipperary from booking into a hotel and so players had made their own way to Dublin and some had stayed overnight with relatives. They took the lead with a goal from Kathleen Downes in the first minute of the game. from the tenth minute Dublin asserted their dominance. Mitchel Cogley wrote in the Irish Independent:

<i>Irish Independent</i> newspaper

The Irish Independent is Ireland's largest-selling daily newspaper, published by Independent News & Media (INM). It often includes glossy magazines. While most of the paper's content in English, it also publishes a weekly supplement in Irish called Seachtain. The Irish Independent's sister publication is the Sunday Independent.

Tipperary flattered only to deceive for the opening ten minutes and even allowing for a couple of fine efforts later on, they were defending for most of the game. For once Kathleen Mills did not display her general all-round ability, but as a contribution to winning her 13th All-Ireland medal she scored a wonder goal which must rank as the greatest ever seen. From fully 45 yards out on the sideline, the CIE club girl with deadly accuracy gave Cathleen Carroll no chance. Dublin’s strength lay in the ability of Kathleen Ryder and Una O’Connor to make the most of their chances against a Tipperary defence that put in extremely hard work for a major portion of the second half. Cathleen Carroll, the Roscrea girl who kept goal for Tipperary played well and added to the numerous goalmouth thrills by bringing off a couple of freakish saves. [7]

Kathleen "Kay" Mills-Hill was an Irish sportsperson who played senior camogie with Dublin from 1941 until 1961. She is regarded as one of the greatest players of all-time, winning a record 15 All Ireland Senior Medals "that no other player in Camogie, hurling or football has equalled."

Kathleen Ryder is a former camogie player, captain of the All Ireland Camogie Championship winning team in 1965 and 1966. She won ten All Ireland senior medals in all.

Úna O'Connor is a former Irish sportsperson who played senior camogie with Dublin from 1953 until 1975. She is regarded as one of the greatest players of all-time, a member of the team of the century. the first camogie player to win a Caltex award in 1966, and the Gaelic Weekly all-star award winner in 1967.

Final stages

Dublin 5-4 – 0-1 Galway

Tipperary 8-0 – 5-1 Antrim

Dublin 5-4 – 1-1 Tipperary
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Dublin
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Tipperary
DUBLIN:
GK1 May Kavanagh (Col San Dominic)
FB2 Betty Hughes (CIÉ)
RWB3Doris Nolan (Celtic)
CB4 Doreen Brennan (UCD)
LWB5 Kay Lyons (Celtic)
MF6 Bríd Reid (Austin Stacks)
MF7 Annette Corrigan (UCD) (0-2)
MF8 Kathleen Mills (CIÉ) (Capt) (2-0)
RWF9 Mary O’Sullivan (Civil Service)
CF10 Kay Ryder (Naomh Aoife) (1-0)
LWF11 Annie Donnelly (UCD) (0-1)
FF12 Úna O'Connor (Celtic) (2-1)
TIPPERARY:
GK1 Catherine Carroll (Roscrea)
FB2 Kitty Flaherty (Cahir)
RWB3 Peg Moloney (Roscrea)
CB4 Kathleen England (Roscrea)
LWB5 Bridie Scully (Roscrea)
MF6 Terry Griffin (Roscrea)
MF7 Alice Hanley (Cahir)
MF8 Mary England (Roscrea) (0-1)
RWF9 Edie Merrigan (Sean Treacy's Hollyford)
CF10 Mary O’Neill (Newcastle)
LWF11 Kathleen Downes (Roscrea) (1-0)
FF12 Kathleen Griffin (Roscrea)

MATCH RULES

  • 50 minutes
  • Replay if scores level
  • Maximum of 3 substitutions

See also

All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship

The GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship, known simply as the All-Ireland Championship, is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county hurling competition in Ireland, and has been contested every year except one since 1887.

National Camogie League

The National Camogie League, known for sponsorship reasons as the Littlewoods Ireland Camogie Leagues, is the second most important competition in the Irish team sport of camogie, played exclusively by women. The competition is held in three divisions graded by ability. It was first played in 1976 for a trophy donated by Allied Irish Banks when Tipperary beat Wexford in a replayed final. Division Two was inaugurated in 1979 and won by Kildare.

Related Research Articles

The 1933 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1933 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin, who defeated Galway by a 17-point margin in the final. The match was played at Killester.

The 1984 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1984 season. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Tipperary by a 14-point margin in the final. The match drew an attendance of 4,219.

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The 1960 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1960 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Galway by a 14-point margin in the final.

The 1959 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1959 camogie season. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated surprise finalists Mayo by a 33-point margin in one of the most one-sided finals in camogie history. The match drew an attendance of 4,000. The championship was the first to have a match televised, when a BBC television crew covered the All-Ireland semi-final between Antrim and Dublin in Belfast.

The 1957 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1957 season in camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final thus gaining revenge for Antrim's semi-final victory of the previous year that interrupted would have been a sequence of 19 All-Ireland championships in a row by Dublin.

The 1941 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1941 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Cork, who defeated Dublin by a 21-point margin in the final.

The 1950 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1950 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated London by a 21-point margin in the final, having already defeated Antrim by a ten-point margin in the home final.

The 1951 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1951 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a 17-point margin in the final. The final was played at Croke Park.

The 1953 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1953 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Tipperary by a 22-point margin in the final.

The 1947 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1947 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Antrim, who defeated Dublin by a three-point margin in the final. The semi-final between Dublin and Galway ranks alongside the disputed semi-final of 1966 between Dublin and Tipperary as the most controversial in camogie history.

The 1948 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1948 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin, who defeated Down by a 23-point margin in the final. It marked the return of Dublin to the roll of honour after an eight-year hiatus when it was separated from the rest of the camogie playing community, as the CIÉ club, which could call on the two greatest players of the era Kathleen Cody and Kathleen Mills, chose to affiliate to Central Council and their one-club selection won the All-Ireland championship.

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The 1975 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1975 season in the sport of camogie. The championship was won by Wexford who defeated Cork by a surprising ten point margin in the final, Cork having defeated reigning champions Kilkenny in the semi-final.

The 1974 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1974 season. The championship was won by Kilkenny who defeated Cork by a four-point margin in the final for a historic first success. The match was replayed, the third time this had happened in a final in the history of camogie.

The 1976 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1976 camogie season in Ireland. The championship was won by Killkenny who defeated Dublin by a one-point margin in the lowest scoring final for 34 years. The match drew an attendance of 6,000. It was the first time that two counties from the same province met in the final of the All-Ireland championship.

The 1983 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was won by Cork, beating Dublin by a two-point margin in the final.

The 1970 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1970 season. The championship was won by Cork, who defeated Killkenny by an 11-point margin in the final. The match drew an attendance of 4,000.

The 1966 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1966 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final. The semi-final between Dublin and Tipperary ranks 1alongside the disputed semi-final of 1947 between Dublin and Galway as the most controversial in camogie history.

The 1965 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1965 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Tipperary by a 13-point margin in the final.

References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5
  2. Report of final in Irish Press, August 11, 1958
  3. Report of final in Irish Independent, August 11, 1958
  4. Report of final in Irish Times, August 11, 1958
  5. Report of final in Irish Examiner, August 11, 1958
  6. Report of final in Irish News, August 11, 1958
  7. Irish Independent Aug 11 1958
Preceded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1957
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932 – present
Succeeded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1959