1955 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

Last updated
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1955
Championship Details
Dates
Counties
Sponsor
All Ireland Champions
Winners Dublin (15th title)
Captain Sophie Brack
Manager
All-Ireland Runners-up
Runners-up Cork
Anna Crotty
Manager
Matches played 2

The 1955 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1955 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Cork by an eight-point margin in the final. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] The match was played at Croke Park and attracted an attendance of 4,192.

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Croke Park stadium in Dublin, Ireland

Croke Park is a Gaelic Athletic Association stadium located in Dublin, Ireland. Named in honour of Archbishop Thomas Croke, it is often called Croker by some GAA fans and locals. It serves both as the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA).

Contents

Championship

Mayo beat Galway by a remarkable 6-1 to nil in the Connacht final. They were beaten heavily by Dublin for whom Una O'Connor scored five goals and Sophie Brack three in the semi-final. A great display by Sheila Cahill in the Cork goal helped her county through the other semi-final.

Úna O'Connor is a former Irish sportsperson who played senior camogie with Dublin from 1953 until 1975. She is regarded as one of the greatest players of all-time, a member of the team of the century. the first camogie player to win a Caltex award in 1966, and the Gaelic Weekly all-star award winner in 1967.

Sophie Brack is a former camogie player who was selected on the camogie team of the century in 2004, and winner of All Ireland medals in 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954 and 1955.

Final

The final was scheduled for August 21 alongside the All Ireland football semi-final but the pitch was so badly cut up by the Dublin v Mayo football semi-final and a thunderstorm caused its cancellation for a week. It meant Cork were able to call on star goalkeeper Sheila Cahill who was not available for the original fixture. The match took place at 7pc, and trains to Cork were delayed to enable supporters to return home, enabling an attendance of 4,192 (it was estimated just 200 had remained for the thunder storm the previous week).

The Final

Cork took an early lead with a goal until Dublin fought back with three goals and a point in a three-minute spell. Dublin successfully defended their lead in a tense second half. Agnes Hourigan wrote in the Irish Press:

Úna Uí Phuirséil was the 17th president of the Camogie Association. Born Agnes Hourigan in Ballingarry, County Limerick, she had three brothers, Dan, Sean, Fr Jack Hourigan, and four sisters [including Maisie and Ellen].

For speed, style, long striking and grand stickwork, this final must surely have been the greatest ever played. Through the opening twenty minutes Cork seemed set to win. Inspired by their captain Anna Crotty, who was everywhere, they were beating Dublin all round and deserved their two goals lead. Then a point from a free by Annette Corrigan gave Dublin heart and they got a grip on the game which, though often disputed, they never lost. Star of the Dublin revival was veteran Kathleen Mills, who in her 12th final (she won her tenth All Ireland medal last night) suddenly found her touch. An inspired spell ten minutes from the end of the first half, which brought them from six points behind to four points in front, set Dublin on the high road to victory. [8]

Aftermath

As a result of her performance, Sophie Brack became the first camogie player to be awarded the Irish Independent sports star of the week on the Friday after the final. Angela Lane’s brother Mick Lane of Dolphin, her brother in law Tom Kiernan and her son, Michael Kiernan were Irish rugby internationals. Eileen Duffy’s brother Billy played first team soccer for Arsenal. Cork goalkeeper, Sheila Cahill, married Donie O'Donovan who won Railway Cup medals with Munster and coached Cork to win the 1973 All-Ireland senior football title. Joan Clancy married West Ham soccer player, Jackie Morley and their son Pat Morley played soccer for Cork City, Shelbourne, Limerick and Waterford United. Sophie Brack captained Dublin to win six All-Ireland championships. Eileen Cronin married Paddy Hogan, who hurled for Laois in the 1949 All-Ireland final. Eileen Bourke was a sister of GAA historian, Marcus De Burca.

<i>Irish Independent</i> newspaper

The Irish Independent is Ireland's largest-selling daily newspaper, published by Independent News & Media (INM). It often includes glossy magazines. While most of the paper's content in English, it also publishes a weekly supplement in Irish called Seachtain. The Irish Independent's sister publication is the Sunday Independent.

Michael "Mick" Lane is an Irish retired hurler who played as a right corner-back for the Cork senior team.

Thomas Joseph Kiernan is a former Ireland international rugby union player. He won 54 caps for Ireland as a full-back between 1960 and 1973 and captained his country 24 times. At the time of his retirement he was Ireland's most-capped player, most experienced captain, and record scorer in international with 158 points. He captained the 1968 British Lions tour to South Africa, playing in all four internationals against South Africa. His nephew, Mike Kiernan, also played for Ireland and the Lions. Tom was also the Munster team coach for their famous victory over the All Blacks in 1978.

Final stages

Dublin 11-5 – 1-0 Mayo

Cork 4-1 – 0-3 Antrim

Dublin 9-2 – 5-6 Cork
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Dublin
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
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Cork
DUBLIN:
GK 1 Eileen Duffy (Celtic)
FB 2 Eileen Kelly (Eoghan Rua)
RWB 3 Betty Hughes (CIÉ)
CB 4 Eileen Cronin (Maurice O’Neills)
LWB 5 Sheila Donnelly (Eoghan Rua)
MF 6 Bríd Reid (Austin Stacks) (1-0)
MF 7 Annette Corrigan (UCD) (0-1)
MF 8 Kathleen Mills (CIÉ)
RWF 9 Fran Maher (Maurice O’Neills) (3-0)
CF 10 Eileen Bourke (UCD)
LWF 11 Úna O'Connor (Celtic) (2-1)
FF 12 Sophie Brack (CIÉ) (Capt) (3-0).
CORK:
GK 1 Sheila Cahill
FB 2 Betty Walsh
RWB 3 Bridie Lucey
CB 4 Teresa Murphy
LWB 5 Joan Clancy
MF 6 Anna Crotty (Capt) (0-3)
MF 7 Lily McKay
MF 8 Peg Lucey Sub off.svg 42'
RWF 9 Angela Lane (1-1)
CF 10 Noreen Duggan (3-2)
LWF 11 Mona Joyce
FF 12 Maura Hayes (1-0). Sub used: Maura O’Connell
Substitutes:
MF Maura O'Connell for Lucey Sub on.svg 42'

MATCH RULES

See also

All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship

The GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship, known simply as the All-Ireland Championship, is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county hurling competition in Ireland, and has been contested every year except one since 1887.

National Camogie League

The National Camogie League, known for sponsorship reasons as the Littlewoods Ireland Camogie Leagues, is the second most important competition in the Irish team sport of camogie, played exclusively by women. The competition is held in three divisions graded by ability. It was first played in 1976 for a trophy donated by Allied Irish Banks when Tipperary beat Wexford in a replayed final. Division Two was inaugurated in 1979 and won by Kildare.

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The 1967 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1967 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Antrim who defeated Dublin by a four-point margin in the final, which went to a replay. It ended a remarkable record of 18 All Ireland titles in 19 years by Dublin, an eight-in-row 1948-‘55 and a ten-in-a-row 1957-’66.

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References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5
  2. 1955 Dublin 9-2 Cork 5-6 recalled in RTÉ radio interview with Eileen Hogan Archived 2007-07-14 at the Wayback Machine .
  3. Report of final in Irish Press, August 29, 1955
  4. Report of final in Irish Independent, August 29, 1955
  5. Report of final in Irish Times, August 29, 1955
  6. Report of final in Irish Examiner, August 29, 1955
  7. Report of final in Irish News, August 29, 1955
  8. Report of final in Irish Press, August 29, 1955
Preceded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1954
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932 – present
Succeeded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1956