1951 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

Last updated
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1951
Championship Details
Dates
Counties
Sponsor
All Ireland Champions
Winners Dublin (11th title)
Captain Sophie Brack
Manager
All-Ireland Runners-up
Runners-up Antrim
Sarah O'Neill
Manager
Matches played 2

The 1951 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1951 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a 17-point margin in the final. [1] The final was played at Croke Park.

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Croke Park stadium in Dublin, Ireland

Croke Park is a Gaelic Athletic Association stadium located in Dublin, Ireland. Named in honour of Archbishop Thomas Croke, it is often called Croker by some GAA fans and locals. It serves both as the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA).

Contents

Structure

London entered the championship at the quarter-final stage and beat Galway 3-4 to 2-2, with strong performances from Nora Scully, Kathleen Waters, Noreen Collins and Bridie Ennis. They lost heavily in the semi-final at New Eltham with Deirdre O’Gorman, Moya Forde and Peg Dooey leading Antrim’s effort.

Final

Sophie Brack scored 4-2 for Dublin in the final. Unaccustomed to the surroundings of Croke Park surroundings the Antrim team did not find their feet until near the end of the first half, by which time Dublin had run up a big score and led 5-3 to 0-1. Antrim did better after half time, their forwards played with more confidence and scored three goals in the opening minutes of the second half and four in all, two from Mary McKeever, and one each from Sarah O'Neill and Madge Rainey. The match was played on front of what was described as a “large attendance” and according to the Irish Independent

Sophie Brack is a former camogie player who was selected on the camogie team of the century in 2004, and winner of All Ireland medals in 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954 and 1955.

Margaret ‘Madge’ Rainey is a former camogie player, captain of the All Ireland Camogie Championship winning team in 1956. She played in the All Ireland senior final of 1951.

<i>Irish Independent</i> newspaper

The Irish Independent is Ireland's largest-selling daily newspaper, published by Independent News & Media (INM). It often includes glossy magazines. While most of the paper's content in English, it also publishes a weekly supplement in Irish called Seachtain. The Irish Independent's sister publication is the Sunday Independent.

“The colours were lavishly displayed by the supporters, the sky-blue of Dublin contrasting with the saffron and white of the Ulster supporters.”

The newspaper commented:

“In Eileen Duffy the winners had a goalkeeper whose anticipation and clearances must surely have disconcerted the most goal hungry forward line. At times she was inspired, one of her saves being superb.”

The Irish Press reports:

“The game as a whole failed to reach the heights expected following last year’s great tussle between the teams. Antrim in particular were disappointing, their defence being very lax, especially in the first half.”

Final stages

Antrim 5-1 – 0-1 London

Dublin 6-6 – 0-1 Tipperary

Dublin 8-6 – 4-1 Antrim
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Dublin
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Antrim
DUBLIN:
GK 1 Eileen Duffy (Celtic)
FB 2 Nan Mahon
RWB 3 Carmel Walsh (CIÉ)
CB 4 Deborah Dunne (Austin Stacks)
LWB 5 Mona Walsh
MF 6 Joan Cosgrave
MF 7 Kathleen Cody (CIÉ) (0-3)
MF 8 Kathleen Mills (CIÉ) (0-1)
RWF 9 Patsy Cooney (1-0)
CF 10 Annie Donnelly (1-0)
LWF 11 Eileen Bourke (UCD) (2-0)
FF 12 Sophie Brack (CIÉ) (Capt) (4-2)
ANTRIM:
GK 1 Pat Rafferty
FB 2 Nancy Murray
RWB 3 Moya Forde
CB 4 Deirdre O’Gorman
LWB 5 Geraldine Swindles
MF 6 Ethna Dougan (0-1)
MF 7 Sue McMullen
MF 8 Mary McGarry
RWF 9 Madge Rainey (1-0)
CF 10 Sarah O’Neill (1-0)
LWF 11 Mary McKeever (2-0)
FF 12 Mary Rua McGarry

MATCH RULES

See also

All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship

The GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship, known simply as the All-Ireland Championship, is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county hurling competition in Ireland, and has been contested every year except one since 1887.

National Camogie League

The National Camogie League, known for sponsorship reasons as the Littlewoods Ireland Camogie Leagues, is the second most important competition in the Irish team sport of camogie, played exclusively by women. The competition is held in three divisions graded by ability. It was first played in 1976 for a trophy donated by Allied Irish Banks when Tipperary beat Wexford in a replayed final. Division Two was inaugurated in 1979 and won by Kildare.

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The 1964 All Ireland Camogie Championship was won by Dublin, their eight title in succession in a winning streak that would eventually extend to ten in a row, beating Antrim in the final. The match was attended by more than 3,000 spectators according to the report in the Irish Times.

The 1978 All Ireland Camogie Championship was won by Cork, who beat Dublin by 17 points in the final. It was the last final to be played using the second crossbar.

The 1934 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1934 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Cork, who defeated Louth by an eight-point margin in the final.

The 1937 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1937 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin, who defeated Galway by a 25-point margin in the final on front of what the Irish Independent reported was one of the biggest crowds ever at a camogie match.

The 1979 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1979 season. The championship was won by Antrim who defeated Tipperary by a three-point margin in the final. The match drew an attendance of 2,900.

The 1961 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1961 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Tipperary by a ten-point margin in the final.

The 1960 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1960 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Galway by a 14-point margin in the final.

The 1959 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1959 camogie season. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated surprise finalists Mayo by a 33-point margin in one of the most one-sided finals in camogie history. The match drew an attendance of 4,000. The championship was the first to have a match televised, when a BBC television crew covered the All-Ireland semi-final between Antrim and Dublin in Belfast.

The 1957 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1957 season in camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final thus gaining revenge for Antrim's semi-final victory of the previous year that interrupted would have been a sequence of 19 All-Ireland championships in a row by Dublin.

The 1941 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1941 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Cork, who defeated Dublin by a 21-point margin in the final.

The 1962 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1962 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Galway by a 14-point margin in the final.

The 1950 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1950 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated London by a 21-point margin in the final, having already defeated Antrim by a ten-point margin in the home final.

The 1952 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1952 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final. The match was played at Croke Park

The 1949 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1949 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin, who defeated London by a 22-point margin in the final "proper" at Croke Park having earlier defeated Tipperary by a 17-point margin in a poorly attended home final in Roscrea. They were to play London in a final "proper" on 4 December, which fell through.

The 1973 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1973 season. The championship was won by Cork who defeated Antrim by a single point margin in the final for their fourth successive success. The match drew an attendance of 4,000.

The 1969 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1969 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Wexford who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final.

The 1967 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1967 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Antrim who defeated Dublin by a four-point margin in the final, which went to a replay. It ended a remarkable record of 18 All Ireland titles in 19 years by Dublin, an eight-in-row 1948-‘55 and a ten-in-a-row 1957-’66.

The 1965 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1965 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Tipperary by a 13-point margin in the final.

The 1963 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1963 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a 13-point margin in the final.

The 1956 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1956 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Antrim who defeated Cork by a four-point margin in the final, having created a major surprise by defeating serial champions Dublin in the semi-final, and interrupting what would otherwise have been a run of 19 championships in a row by Dublin. The championship featured what were reportedly two of the best camogie matches in the history of the game in its 12-a-side phase, the final and the semi-final between Antrim and Dublin.

References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5
Preceded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1950
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932 – present
Succeeded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1952