1949 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

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All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1949
Championship Details
Dates4 December
Counties
Sponsor
All Ireland Champions
Winners Dublin (9th title)
Captain Doreen Rogers
Manager
All-Ireland Runners-up
Runners-up Tipperary
Madeline Bowers
Manager
Matches played

The 1949 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1949 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin, who defeated London by a 22-point margin in the final "proper" at Croke Park having earlier defeated Tipperary by a 17-point margin in a poorly attended home final in Roscrea. They were to play London in a final "proper" on 4 December, which fell through. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Croke Park stadium in Dublin, Ireland

Croke Park is a Gaelic Athletic Association stadium located in Dublin, Ireland. Named in honour of Archbishop Thomas Croke, it is often called Croker by some GAA fans and locals. It serves both as the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA).

Contents

Structure

It was clear that CIÉ clubmates Kathleen Cody and Sophie Brack had hit their top form together throughout the championship. When Dublin beat Wexford 8–7 to nil in the Leinster final at New Ross the Sophie Brack scored six goals and Kathleen Cody scored 0–7, Doreen Rogers and Pat Rafferty scoring the other goals. They then beat Down by 3–4 to 1–3 at Kilclief, with the help of an own goal by a Down defender and goals by Kathleen O'Keeffe and Sophie Brack. Dublin had just two surviving players from their controversial 1948 side, Kathleen Cody and Sophie Brack Tipperary beat Galway 3–2 to 1–3 in the All Ireland semi-final at Roscrea before 1,000 spectators and a match described as "the best in many years".

Kathleen Cody is a former camogie player, one of the leading players of her generation and one of the game’s most accomplished goalscorers.

Sophie Brack is a former camogie player who was selected on the camogie team of the century in 2004, and winner of All Ireland medals in 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954 and 1955.

Doreen Rogers is a former camogie player, captain of the All Ireland Camogie Championship winning team in 1944 and 1949.

The game was one of the best seen in the championship this year and the net minding of Kathleen Griffin for the visitors won rounds of applause.

Of particular note was the exchange of goals midway through the first half by May Hynes of Tipperary and Scully of Galway.

Final

Kathleen Cody scored a soft goal in the opening minute of the final at St Cronan's Park in Roscrea and ended up scoring a total of 6–7 for Dublin, all but two goals of Dublin's total of 8–7. The Irish Independent reported:

<i>Irish Independent</i> newspaper

The Irish Independent is Ireland's largest-selling daily newspaper, published by Independent News & Media (INM). It often includes glossy magazines. While most of the paper's content in English, it also publishes a weekly supplement in Irish called Seachtain. The Irish Independent's sister publication is the Sunday Independent.

A feature of the game was the outstanding individual play of Kathleen Cody, who several times went right through the Tipperary defence from midfield. Tipperary were not able to cope with Dublin in any section of the field and soft scores in the first half left Dublin ahead 7–4 to 1–1 at half time. [7]

The Irish Press reported,

There was no denying that Dublin were the better side. They combined much better and were more accurate in shooting. They were vastly superior in the first half and had the game won at the interval. This time Sophie Brack scored six goals and Kathleen Cody scored 2–3.

The gate receipts at Roscrea were wiped out by the expenses incurred in staging the event, including a large bill submitted by local stewards. Radio Éireann did not broadcast the final because of the expense of taking a unit to Roscrea.

Final proper

London defeated Lancashire "after a hard struggle" and Warwickshire to qualify for the All Ireland final as British champions, a match in which Dublin had a facile win over London. The Irish Press reported of the match:

Were it not for an obvious easing off on the part of the forwards in the second half their final score would have been a far more impressive one. The standard of play was not as low as the scores would seem to indicate and an otherwise uninteresting game was at times relieved by some bright passages of play. Chief interest centred on the brilliant individual displays of Noreen Collins of London and Kathleen Cody of Dublin, who, in particular, delighting the crowds with some wonderful scores and delightful solo runs. [8]

Three Waters sisters played for London in the final. Dublin and London teams were entertained in the CIE hall in Phibsboro after the match on Sunday evening after the final. Agnes O'Farrelly sent a message to the teams:

It is heartening to think of our kindred from England returning to the home of their people as trained athletes.

The match had taken place less than eighteen months after the revival of camogie in Britain. Matches in London were played on a full-sized hurling pitch, leaving their players with the additional handicap of adapting to the smaller space. [9] [10]

Final stages

Tipperaryy 3–2 – 1–3 Galway

Dublin 3–4 – 1–3 Down

Dublin 8–7 – 4–1 Tipperary

Dublin 9–3 – 2–2 London

Home final: Dublin 8–7 Tipperary 4–1

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Dublin
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Tipperary
Dublin:
GK1 Eileen Duffy (Celtic)
FB2 Anna Young (Celtic)
RWB3 Patricia O'Connor (Celtic)
CB4 Rose Fletcher (Scoil Bríghde)
LWB5 Mona Walsh (Eoghan Rua)
MF6 Nancy Caffrey (Eoghan Rua)
MF7 Kathleen Cody (CIÉ) (6–7)
MF8 Mary Kelly (Celtic)
RWF9 Kathleen O'Keeffe (Optimists) (1–0)
CF10 Pat Raftery (Col San Dominic)
LWF11 Doreen Rogers (Austin Stacks) (Capt) (1–0)
FF12 Sophie Brack (CIÉ).
Tipperary:
GK1 Marie Flanagan (Roscrea)
FB2 Terry Griffin (Roscrea)
RWB3 Mary Ann O'Brien (Roscrea) (1–1)
CB4 Madeline Bowers (Roscrea) (Capt)
LWB5 Kitty Gleeson (Loughmore)
MF6 Kitty Callanan (Loughmore)
MF7 Mary Power (Clonmel)
MF8 Joan Maher (Roscrea)
RWF9 Eileen Walsh (Loughmore) (2-0)
CF10 May Hynes (Roscrea) Sub off.svg 36'
LWF11 Maura Curran (Carrick-on-Suir)
FF12 Margaret Walsh (Loughmore)
Substitute:
LCF Lizzie Aherne (Roscrea) 1–0 Sub on.svg 36'
Match Rules

Final "proper": Dublin 9–3 London 2–2

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Dublin
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London
Dublin:
GK1 Eileen Duffy (Celtic)
FB2 Anna Young (Celtic)
RWB3 Patricia O'Connor (Celtic)
CB4 Rose Fletcher (Scoil Bríghde)
LWB5 Mona Walsh (Eoghan Rua)
MF6 Kathleen Cody (CIÉ) 2–3
MF7 Nancy Caffrey (Eoghan Rua)
MF8 Rose Blake (Austin Stacks)
RWF9 Mary Kelly (Celtic) Kathleen O'Keeffe (Optimists)
CF10 Kathleen O'Keeffe (Optimists)
LWF11 Sophie Brack (CIÉ) 6–0
FF12 Doreen Rogers (Austin Stacks) 1–0(Capt)
London:
GK1 Nora Waters Cuchulainns & Tipperary
FB2 Bridie Ennis Cuchulainns & Tipperary
RWB3J Keohane St Monica's & Tipperary
CB4 Kathleen O'Reilly Sarsfields & Meath
LWB5 Kathleen Waters Cuchulainns & Tipperary
MF6 Brigid Kelly Sarsfields & Galway
MF7A Lee Cuchulainns & Cavan
MF8M Kelly 1–0 St Monica's & Kilkenny
RWF9 Noreen Collins Sarsfields & Kerry 0–2
CF10M Ward & Sarsfields & Meath 1–0
LWF11 Lil Ward Sarsfields & Meath (captain)
FF12I Cotter Cuchulainns & Cork
Match Rules

See also

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References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5
  2. Report of final in Irish Press, November 1, 1949
  3. Report of final in Irish Independent, November 1, 1949
  4. Report of final in Irish Times, November 1, 1949
  5. Report of final in Irish Examiner, November 1, 1949
  6. Report of final in Irish News, November 1, 1949
  7. Report of final in Irish Independent, November 1, 1949
  8. Report of final in Irish Press, December 5, 1949
  9. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5 page 84
  10. The London team was drawn from three clubs Cuchulainn's, Sarsfield's and St Monica's: N Waters, B Ennis, J Keohane, K O'Reilly, K Waters, N Collins, B Kelly, A Lee, M Ward (Capt), M Kelly, I Cotter and L Ward
Preceded by
1948 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932–present
Succeeded by
1950 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship