1960 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

Last updated
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1960
Championship Details
Dates
Counties
Sponsor
All Ireland Champions
Winners Dublin (19th title)
Captain Doreen Brennan
Manager Nell McCarthy
All-Ireland Runners-up
Runners-up Galway
Kathleen Corcoran
Manager
Matches played

The 1960 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1960 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Galway by a 14-point margin in the final. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Contents

Changes in the old order

Dublin needed twenty minutes of extra time to beat Tipperary in the semi-final after what Agnes Hourigan described in the Irish Press as "one of the hardest, fastest and most exciting camogie matches ever played". Tipperary led 1-1 to nil at half time through a goal from Brid Scully, the score was 2–1 each at full time, Kathleen Mills shot a spectacular long range goal from a free in the first minute of extra time and Dublin never subsequently lost the lead, although Tipperary cut the lead back to a point. Galway shocked Antrim in the All Ireland semi-final at Casement Park with a bizarre match-winning goal. Antrim, led until three minutes from the end, when Chris Conway dropped a high lobbing ball into the Antrim goalmouth. The ball struck the in-rushing Emer Walsh on the top of the head and was deflected out of the reach of the Antrim goalkeeper for the winner

Úna Uí Phuirséil was the 17th president of the Camogie Association. Born Agnes Hourigan in Ballingarry, County Limerick, she had three brothers, Dan, Sean, Fr Jack Hourigan, and four sisters [including Maisie and Ellen].

Final

Interest in the final had evaporated by the time it was played, delayed by the drawn All Ireland senior football final.

Final stages

Dublin 5–1 – 3–3 after extra time Tipperary

Galway 3–1 – 2–3 Antrim

Dublin 6–2 – 2–0 Galway
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Dublin
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Galway
DUBLIN:
GK1 Eithne Leech (Celtic)
FB2 Betty Hughes (CIÉ)
RWB3 Nuala Murney (UCD)
CB4 Doreen Brennan (UCD) (Capt)
LWB5 Anna Nulty (CIÉ)
MF6 Colette Nolan (Eoghan Rua)
MF7 Ally Hussey (Celtic)
MF8 Kathleen Mills (CIÉ)
RWF9 Joan Kinsella (Civil Service) (3–0)
CF10 Kay Ryder (Naomh Aoife)
LWF11 Annie Donnelly (UCD) (1–0)
FF12 Úna O'Connor (Celtic) (2–2)
GALWAY:
GK1 Eileen Naughton (St Mary's)
FB2 Patsy Colclough (St Enda's)
RWB3 Evelyn Niland (St Mary's)
CB4 Ronnie Heneghan (Castlegar)
LWB5 Sheila Tonry (Castlegar)
MF6 Chris Conway (Castlegar)
MF7 Kathleen Higgins (Athenry) (1–0)
MF8 Kathleen Corcoran (Castlegar) (Capt)
RWF9 Frances Fox (St Enda's) (1–0)
CF10 Kathleen Clancy (St Mary's)
LWF11 Kathleen Flaherty (Castlegar)
FF12 Emer Walsh (Castlegar)

MATCH RULES

  • 50 minutes
  • Replay if scores level
  • Maximum of 3 substitutions

See also

All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship

The GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship, known simply as the All-Ireland Championship, is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county hurling competition in Ireland, and has been contested every year except one since 1887.

National Camogie League

The National Camogie League, known for sponsorship reasons as the Littlewoods Ireland Camogie Leagues, is the second most important competition in the Irish team sport of camogie, played exclusively by women. The competition is held in three divisions graded by ability. It was first played in 1976 for a trophy donated by Allied Irish Banks when Tipperary beat Wexford in a replayed final. Division Two was inaugurated in 1979 and won by Kildare.

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The 1983 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was won by Cork, beating Dublin by a two-point margin in the final.

The 1969 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1969 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Wexford who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final.

The 1966 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1966 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Antrim by a two-point margin in the final. The semi-final between Dublin and Tipperary ranks 1alongside the disputed semi-final of 1947 between Dublin and Galway as the most controversial in camogie history.

References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5
  2. Report of final in Irish Press, November 14, 1960
  3. Report of final in Irish Independent, November 14, 1960
  4. Report of final in Irish Times, November 14, 1960
  5. Report of final in Irish Examiner, November 14, 1960
  6. Report of final in Irish News, November 14, 1960
Preceded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1959
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932 – present
Succeeded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1961