1962 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

Last updated
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1962
Championship Details
Dates
Counties
Sponsor
All Ireland Champions
Winners Dublin (21st title)
Captain Betty Hughes
Manager
All-Ireland Runners-up
Runners-up Galway
Sheila Tonry
Manager
Matches played

The 1962 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1962 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated Galway by a 14-point margin in the final. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-seventh title thanks to a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women; it is almost identical to the game of hurling played by men. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities. It is organised by the Dublin-based Camogie Association or An Cumann Camógaíochta. UNESCO lists Camogie as an element of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Contents

Season

Emer Walsh had two goals for Galway in their semi-final win over Cork. Dublin's semi-final win over Antrim was described as "lucky but deserved" as Dublin fought back from seven points behind at half-time. Una O'Connor, Judy Doyle and Patricia Timmins picked up two goals each and Marion Kearns and [Maeve Gilroy] responded, also with two goals each, and Mairead McAtamney and Breda Smyth scored a goal each. Writing about the Dublin-Antrim semi-final Pádraig Puirséil wrote in the Irish Press:

Úna O'Connor is a former Irish sportsperson who played senior camogie with Dublin from 1953 until 1975. She is regarded as one of the greatest players of all-time, a member of the team of the century. the first camogie player to win a Caltex award in 1966, and the Gaelic Weekly all-star award winner in 1967.

Judy Doyle is a former camogie player who was one of the leading goalscorers of her generation, the scorer of three goals for Dublin against Tipperary in the 1961 All Ireland final, four goals for Dublin against Antrim in the 1964 All Ireland final and five goals for Dublin against Tipperary in the 1965 All Ireland final. She won six All Ireland senior medals in all. She won six All Ireland medals from 1961 to 1966 and five Gael Linn Cup medals.

I have seen some stage of every All_ireland camogie championship ever played since the O'Duffy cup competition began in the 1932-'33 season but I cannot remember a more effective right wing than Antrim's Mairead McAtamney on Sunday last. Right had or left, whether the ball was on the ground or in the air, she looked the most accomplished player of the day. Her nearest rival was her team mate, right forward Marion Kearns who also gave a classic display. [7]

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Final

Dublin led by 4–3 at half-time, their first goal coming from 15-year-old Patricia Timmins. Agnes Hourigan wrote in the Irish Press:

Úna Uí Phuirséil was the 17th president of the Camogie Association. Born Agnes Hourigan in Ballingarry, County Limerick, she had three brothers, Dan, Sean, Fr Jack Hourigan, and four sisters [including Maisie and Ellen].

While there could be no doubt whatever about the superiority of the winners, the game itself fell well below expectations. Close marking kept spectacular play to an absolute minimum while Dublin's pronounced superiority at midfield meant that, for three quarters of the game, the battle was almost entirely confined to a hard fought struggle between the Dublin forwards and the Galway backs. The western forwards, poorly served by their midfielders, had to travel far out for the ball and rarely troubled the Dublin defence, though it must be recorded in their favour that they did snatch the only two real chances they got, one in each half. [8]

Galway's case in the final was not helped by the injury to their star defender Veronica Heneghan. The Connacht Tribune reported

The Connacht Tribune is a newspaper circulating chiefly in County Galway, Ireland.

Dublin who started firm favourites were more than a little surprised by the tenacity of the Galway girls, who fought all the way. There was always that lingering feeling that Galway may finish in front. Galway's twelve layers never gave an inch in a hard-hitting, hard-tackling and close-marking game. The fact that marking was so close that polished and spectacular play was reduced to an absolute minimum. Although the game was lacking in finesse, it was not lacking in excitement. The game held interest in the end and was always entertaining. Galway did not win, but their goalie, Eileen Naughton of St Mary's was the most outstanding player on the field. She gave a superb and first rate display. She let in five goals, but it must be remembered that, in spite of some bad coverage by the backs, she saved at least ten other scores. Eileen;s clearances brought round after round of applause from the crowd, the largest attendance ever at a camogie final.

[9]

Final stages

Galway 3–1 – 1–4 Cork

Dublin 6–4 – 6–2 Antrim

Dublin 5–5 – 2–0 Galway
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Dublin
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Galway
DUBLIN:
GK1 Eithne Leech (Celtic)
FB2 Betty Hughes (CIÉ) (Capt)
RWB3 Nuala Murney (UCD)
CB4 Ally Hussey (Celtic)
LWB5 Kay Lyons (Eoghan Rua)
MF6 Kay Ryder (Naomh Aoife)
MF7 Mary Sherlock (Austin Stacks)
MF8 Mary Ryan (Austin Stacks) (0-2)
RWF9 Patricia Timmins (Naomh Aoife) (1–0)
CF10 Bríd Keenan (Austin Stacks) (0–1)
LWF11 Judy Doyle (CIÉ) (3–1)
FF12 Úna O'Connor (Celtic) (1–1)
GALWAY:
GK1 Eileen Naughton (St Mary's)
FB2 Pauline Colclough (St Mary's)
RWB3 Rita Flaherty (Castlegar)
CB4 Ronnie Heneghan (Castlegar) Sub on.svg 36'
LWB5 Sheila Tonry (Castlegar) (Capt)
MF6 Kathleen Higgins (Athenry)
MF7 Kay Quinn (Castlegar)
MF8 Chris Conway-Furey (Castlegar)
RWF9 Frances Fox (St Mary's)
CF10 Kathleen Clancy (St Mary's) (1–0)
LWF11 Kathleen Flaherty (Castlegar) (1-0)
FF12 Emer Walsh (Castlegar)
Substitutes:
LCF Bridie Newell (Castlegar) for Ronnie Heneghan Sub on.svg 36'

MATCH RULES

  • 50 minutes
  • Replay if scores level
  • Maximum of 3 substitutions

See also

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References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460. 978-1-908591-00-5
  2. Report of final in Irish Press, August 13, 1962
  3. Report of final in Irish Independent, August 13, 1962
  4. Report of final in Irish Times, August 13, 1962
  5. Report of final in Irish Examiner, August 13, 1962
  6. Report of final in Irish News, August 13, 1962
  7. Irish Press August 13, 1962
  8. Irish Press August 13, 1962
  9. Connacht Tribune August 20, 1962
Preceded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1961
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
1932 – present
Succeeded by
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship 1963